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Emotional Abuse And Controlling Behaviors In Heterosexual Relationships: The Role Of Employment And Alcohol Use For Women And Their Partners, Egbert Zavala, Ryan E. Spohn 2010 Kansas State University

Emotional Abuse And Controlling Behaviors In Heterosexual Relationships: The Role Of Employment And Alcohol Use For Women And Their Partners, Egbert Zavala, Ryan E. Spohn

Criminology and Criminal Justice Faculty Publications

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of economic resources, status compatibility, and alcohol consumption on forms of nonphysical abuse, such as controlling and emotional abuse. Specifically, we focus on the connections between women’s employment, the employment of their partners, alcohol use, and women’s risk of abuse in intimate relationships. We hypothesize that women in intimate relationships with men will experience more emotional abuse to the extent that they are economically vulnerable. Moreover, abuse should increase if their employment status, in relation to that of their partner, challenges the man’s marital power. Moreover, alcohol use by women …


Rural Families With A Child Abuse Report Are More Likely Headed By A Single Parent And Endure Economic And Family Stress, Marybeth J. Mattingly, Wendy A. Walsh 2010 University of New Hampshire

Rural Families With A Child Abuse Report Are More Likely Headed By A Single Parent And Endure Economic And Family Stress, Marybeth J. Mattingly, Wendy A. Walsh

The Carsey School of Public Policy at the Scholars' Repository

This brief, which is based on data from the Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, finds that rural families who have been reported to Child Protective Services are more likely than urban families to have financial difficulties and high family stress, as well as grow up in single-parent households. To effectively address these issues, the brief urges policy makers to look at the lack of accessible and adequate services for struggling rural families.


Parental Leadership: The Mary Poppins Metaphor, Brad Van Alstyne 2010 Department of Communication and Media Studies, Dominican University of California

Parental Leadership: The Mary Poppins Metaphor, Brad Van Alstyne

Collected Faculty and Staff Scholarship

Existing theories on leadership are usually based on efforts we are familiar with in which leaders are easily defined (work, war, sports, etc). Little analysis to date has been placed on the role of parents as leaders outside of the social sciences where the focus of the research is usually an offshoot of psychology or childhood development. The parent as leader is a unique focus in that there are several qualities of the parent role that are quite different from that of the typical supervisory roles we normally discuss, while at the same time it would be foolish to think …


A Community Coalition Promotes Family Literacy With Story Celebrations, M. Susan McWilliams 2010 University of Nebraska at Omaha

A Community Coalition Promotes Family Literacy With Story Celebrations, M. Susan Mcwilliams

Teacher Education Faculty Publications

A coalition is typically formed between individuals or groups to bring unique strengths together in a cooperative manner to address a common cause. In our community, an alliance was formed to raise public consciousness about the impact of family reading on children's literacy development. As a coalition, we planned, organized and funded literacy-related events or story celebrations in multiple locations throughout the community. In this article, I describe and provide rationale for creating a coalition that advocates for family literacy.


Caught In A Time Warp: The Education Rights Of English Language Learners, Rosemary Salomone 2010 St. John's University School of Law

Caught In A Time Warp: The Education Rights Of English Language Learners, Rosemary Salomone

Journal of Civil Rights and Economic Development

(Excerpt)

Although the United States has long experience in educating children from immigrant families, the role the home language should play in the education of those who are not proficient in English remains politically charged and unresolved. For the past four decades, since the first infusion of federal funds that support programs for what are now called "English Language Learners," this question has engaged educators, policy makers, and researchers in a heated debate centering on bilingual education versus English-Only instruction. The first approach generally uses the child's home language either as a transitional bridge to learning English or, less commonly, …


Facility Assessment Report: Introducing Pay-For-Performance (P4p) Approach To Increase Utilization Of Maternal, Newborn, And Child Health Services In Bangladesh, Md. Noorunnabi Talukder, Ubaidur Rob, Laila Rahman, Ismat Ara Hena, Farhana Akter, Mohammad Ataur Rahman, Md. Julkarnayeen, Md. Akteruzzaman, Md. Sohel Rana, Ripa Ali 2010 Population Council

Facility Assessment Report: Introducing Pay-For-Performance (P4p) Approach To Increase Utilization Of Maternal, Newborn, And Child Health Services In Bangladesh, Md. Noorunnabi Talukder, Ubaidur Rob, Laila Rahman, Ismat Ara Hena, Farhana Akter, Mohammad Ataur Rahman, Md. Julkarnayeen, Md. Akteruzzaman, Md. Sohel Rana, Ripa Ali

Reproductive Health

Under the leadership of the Directorate General of Health Services, the Population Council in collaboration with James P. Grant School of Public Health, BRAC University and with support from UNICEF is testing an innovative service delivery model to provide financial incentives to institutions to enhance their performance on maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) services in three districts of Bangladesh as part of GOB-UNICEF’s ongoing MNCH/MNH projects. A comparative analysis on the availability and condition of physical and human assets across 16 health facilities will inform what is needed in a facility in terms of inputs and processes. This report …


Increasing Postpartum Contraception In Rural Uttar Pradesh: Implications For Behavior Change Communication, Population Council 2010 Population Council

Increasing Postpartum Contraception In Rural Uttar Pradesh: Implications For Behavior Change Communication, Population Council

Reproductive Health

The Population Council conducted a formative study in rural Uttar Pradesh, India to assess the level of adoption of postpartum contraception for spacing among low parity women, identify the facilitating factors and barriers to the adoption of this target behavior, and identify programmatic and behavior change communications (BCC) initiatives that could accelerate the adoption of postpartum contraception for spacing and improve the service delivery system, if required, to facilitate the process. Barriers included low awareness of consequences of closely spaced births, misconceptions about contraceptive methods, lack of counseling by health workers, reluctance to include husbands, and programmatic emphasis on limiting …


Clergy Family Systems Training And How It Changes Clergy Leadership Attitudes And Practices, Michael J. Aufderhar 2010 Andrews University

Clergy Family Systems Training And How It Changes Clergy Leadership Attitudes And Practices, Michael J. Aufderhar

Dissertations

Problem. Clergy persons without an awareness of their family system patterns and reactivity often exercise their leadership in unhealthy ways that are damaging to their congregations. This study described changes in leadership attitudes and practices experienced by clergy participants in a Family Systems training program conducted by Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary.

Method. This qualitative case study followed a narrative design. I collected data while participating in the program and 3 years later conducted semi-structured person-to-person interviews with all participants who were willing and available. The data also include drawings by each participant depicting their experience before and after the intervention. …


Risk Factors For Poor Attendance In A Family-Based Pediatric Obesity Intervention Program For Young Children, Natalie A. Williams, Mace Coday, Grant Somes, Frances A. Tylavsky, Phyllis A. Richey, Marion E. Hare 2010 University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Risk Factors For Poor Attendance In A Family-Based Pediatric Obesity Intervention Program For Young Children, Natalie A. Williams, Mace Coday, Grant Somes, Frances A. Tylavsky, Phyllis A. Richey, Marion E. Hare

Faculty Publications, Department of Child, Youth, and Family Studies

Objective—This study examined the role of demographic characteristics, psychological factors, and family functioning on attendance in a randomized controlled trial of a family-based pediatric obesity program.

Method—Participants included 155 children between the ages of 4 and 7 years (M age = 5.77, 57.4% female, 73.6% African-American, M BMI = 25.5) and their primary caregivers who were randomized to the treatment group. Three groups of participants were created based on their patterns of attendance during the program: 1) noncompleters, 2) partial completers, and 3) completers.

Results—Results indicated no differences among the attendance groups in child gender, child BMI, …


Rural Community Longevity: Capitalizing On Diversity For Immigrant Residential Stability, Rochelle L. Dalla, Tammy R. Stuhmer, Jennifer G. DeLeón, Maria Isabel León Carreño 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Rural Community Longevity: Capitalizing On Diversity For Immigrant Residential Stability, Rochelle L. Dalla, Tammy R. Stuhmer, Jennifer G. Deleón, Maria Isabel León Carreño

Faculty Publications, Department of Child, Youth, and Family Studies

The premise of this research is that rural immigrants comprise a significant source of untapped human and social capital necessary for community development. However, to capitalize on the growing ethnic diversity in rural America, immigrant newcomers must want to stay in their new rural communities. This investigation was designed to identify factors necessary to enhance rural Latino immigrants’ long-term residential stability. Thus, we sought to: (1) identify perceptions of rural residence, with particular attention to employment opportunities and challenges; (2) assess formal support availability and community issues of greatest concern to rural Latinas; and (3) identify strategies for creating bi-cultural …


An Examination Of The Relationship Between Family And U.S. Latinos’ Physical Health, Georgiana Bostean 2010 Chapman University

An Examination Of The Relationship Between Family And U.S. Latinos’ Physical Health, Georgiana Bostean

Sociology Faculty Articles and Research

Latinos, especially immigrant Latinos, have lower mortality rates and some better health outcomes than U.S.-born Latinos and whites, a situation called the Latino Paradox. One explanation for the advantage is that Latinos’ family orientation protects health. However, because few large-scale studies examine Latinos’ family relationships by nativity, the extent to which family factors contribute to Latinos’ health outcomes is unclear. Additionally, while a large literature focuses on family cohesion, fewer studies address both cohesion and conflict, which may be particularly important among immigrants, whose migration and adaptation experiences can strain family relations. This study examines the relationship between family context …


Social Relationships And Mortality Risk: A Meta-Analytic Review, Julianne Holt-Lunstad 2010 Brigham Young University

Social Relationships And Mortality Risk: A Meta-Analytic Review, Julianne Holt-Lunstad

Faculty Publications

Background

The quality and quantity of individuals' social relationships has been linked not only to mental health but also to both morbidity and mortality.

Objectives

This meta-analytic review was conducted to determine the extent to which social relationships influence risk for mortality, which aspects of social relationships are most highly predictive, and which factors may moderate the risk.

Data Extraction

Data were extracted on several participant characteristics, including cause of mortality, initial health status, and pre-existing health conditions, as well as on study characteristics, including length of follow-up and type of assessment of social relationships.

Results

Across 148 studies (308,849 …


“All The Men Here Have The Peter Pan Syndrome— They Don’T Want To Grow Up”: Navajo Adolescent Mothers’ Intimate Partner Relationships—A 15-Year Perspective, Rochelle L. Dalla, Alexandria M. Marchetti, Elizabeth (Beth) A. Sechrest, Jennifer L. White 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

“All The Men Here Have The Peter Pan Syndrome— They Don’T Want To Grow Up”: Navajo Adolescent Mothers’ Intimate Partner Relationships—A 15-Year Perspective, Rochelle L. Dalla, Alexandria M. Marchetti, Elizabeth (Beth) A. Sechrest, Jennifer L. White

Faculty Publications, Department of Child, Youth, and Family Studies

In 1992 and 1995, data were collected from 29 Navajo Native American adolescent mothers. In 2007 and 2008, data were collected from 21 of the original 29 (72%). Guided by feminist family theory, this investigation sought to (a) examine Navajo adolescent mothers’ intimate partner relationships during the transition to parenthood, (b) identify themes in the young mothers’ intimate partnerships across time, and (c) assess participants’ psychosocial well-being in adulthood. Four themes emerged in the women’s long-term intimate relationships: limited support, substance abuse, infidelity, and intimate partner violence. Implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.


Black And White Women In Blue: A Case Study Of Policewomen, Danielle Marie Teunion-Smith 2010 Wayne State University

Black And White Women In Blue: A Case Study Of Policewomen, Danielle Marie Teunion-Smith

Wayne State University Dissertations

This exploratory study examines the policing experiences of fourteen African American and White female police officers using interviews and observations. There is ample research that addresses the ability of women to perform policing duties, but most of the literature presumes that White and African American policewomen are a single aggregate. These ignored societal differences and social realities of black and white policewomen, based on distinctive assigned social positions, histories, images and location, possibly contribute to different perspectives and experiences in law enforcement. These same social realities shape occupational positions, perspectives, perceptions, and treatment within law enforcement organizations. There are broad …


Parental Timing And Depressive Symptoms In Early Adulthood, Christina D. Falci, Jeylan Mortimer, HarmoniJoie Noel 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Parental Timing And Depressive Symptoms In Early Adulthood, Christina D. Falci, Jeylan Mortimer, Harmonijoie Noel

Sociology Department, Faculty Publications

Using data from a panel of 459 women, we find that early parents (birth) report higher levels of depressive symptoms in young adulthood (roughly age 29) compared to later parents (first birth in their 20s) or nonparents. Early parenting is also associated with more stressors and fewer resources in young adulthood. As young adults, early parents have lower educational attainment, less secure employment and a weaker sense of personal control; they also experience greater financial strain and more traumatic life events than later and nonparents. By the end of their 20s, early parents are also more likely to be single …


Thomas Carlyle’S Lost Translation Of Saint-Simon’S Nouveau Christianisme: An Epistolary Account, Michael R. Hill 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Thomas Carlyle’S Lost Translation Of Saint-Simon’S Nouveau Christianisme: An Epistolary Account, Michael R. Hill

Sociology Department, Faculty Publications

The first-known (and now lost) translation of Saint-Simon’s Nouveau christianisme was prepared by the well-known Scotch-born prose writer, Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881). Carlyle was considerably interested in the Saint- Simonian movement (Cofer 1931; Murphy 1936; Shine 1941) and undertook to translate Saint-Simon’s last work during the latter half of 1830. The following excerpts from Carlyle’s correspondence reveal that he was unable to find a willing publisher for his translation, and the manuscript subsequently disappeared, presumably in France. This unfortunate chain of events accounts in part for the circumstance that Nouveau christianisme was not better-known among Englishspeaking sociologists and lay readers. Although …


Charlotte Perkins Gilman And The Entrepreneurial Turn: A Working Introduction, Michael R. Hill 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Charlotte Perkins Gilman And The Entrepreneurial Turn: A Working Introduction, Michael R. Hill

Sociology Department, Faculty Publications

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, lived from 1860 to 1935 — the same years as did Jane Addams. Gilman was an American, a pioneering sociologist, an influential feminist pragmatist, a peripatetic lecturer, a prolific author, and a friend of Addams. Although Gilman died in 1935, she remains today a provocative sociological presence whose writings continue to make us think, argue, and question our preconceptions. This paper explores the entrepreneurial basis of Gilman’s life as a professional sociologist, including her work as an artist, public speaker, and writer. Gilman promoted the core ideas that (1) humanness trumps sexual difference, (2) social logic is …


The Hidden Infertile: Infertile Women Without Pregnancy Intent In The United States, Arthur L. Greil, Julia McQuillan, Katherine Johnson, Kathleen Slauson-Blevins, Karina M. Shreffler 2010 Alfred University

The Hidden Infertile: Infertile Women Without Pregnancy Intent In The United States, Arthur L. Greil, Julia Mcquillan, Katherine Johnson, Kathleen Slauson-Blevins, Karina M. Shreffler

Sociology Department, Faculty Publications

A national probability sample reveals two relatively distinct groups of infertile women: those with intent, who have experienced a period of 12 or more months during which they tried to conceive but did not, and those without intent, who had a period of at least 12 months during which they could have conceived and did not but who do not describe themselves as having tried to become pregnant at that time. Those with intent are more likely to identify as having a fertility problem, to be distressed, and to pursue infertility treatment than those without intent, suggesting that many women …


The Role Of Social Support Systems In Reducing Loneliness And Social Isolation For Parents Whose Partner Work Fly-In/Fly-Out, Nicole Fresle 2010 Edith Cowan University

The Role Of Social Support Systems In Reducing Loneliness And Social Isolation For Parents Whose Partner Work Fly-In/Fly-Out, Nicole Fresle

Theses : Honours

Fly-in/fly-out (FIFO) practices in the mining and contracting industries are currently prominent and expanding throughout Western Australia. There is a strong need for effective social support systems for families during the worker's deployment due to long periods of time apart, reappraisal of family roles and social isolation. This study used a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of parents whose partners are employed on a fly-in/fly-out basis and their views of social support systems in addressing the issues of loneliness and isolation. Family resilience was also utilised to investigate how female home-based partners deal with the stress involved …


Tribal Vs. Public Schools: Perceived Discrimination And School Adjustment Among Indigenous Children From Early To Mid- Adolescence, Devan M. Crawford, Jacob E. Cheadle, Les B. Whitbeck 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Tribal Vs. Public Schools: Perceived Discrimination And School Adjustment Among Indigenous Children From Early To Mid- Adolescence, Devan M. Crawford, Jacob E. Cheadle, Les B. Whitbeck

Sociology Department, Faculty Publications

The purpose of this study is to assess the differential effects of perceived discrimination by type of school on positive school adjustment among Indigenous children during late elementary and early middle school years. The analysis utilizes a sample of 654 Indigenous children from four reservations in the Northern Midwest and four Canadian First Nation reserves. Multiple group linear growth modeling within a structural equation framework is employed to investigate the moderating effects of school type on the relationship between discrimination and positive school adjustment. Results show that students in all school types score relatively high on positive school adjustment at …


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