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How Does Education Level Affect Marital Processes, Stephen V. Mortensen, Karen Peterson, Candace Shields, Julie Voisin 2010 Brigham Young University

How Does Education Level Affect Marital Processes, Stephen V. Mortensen, Karen Peterson, Candace Shields, Julie Voisin

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Current research utilizes SES levels as a predictor of marital interactions. However, since higher education attainment levels usually lead to higher SES levels, it is presumed that education can also be used as a predictor of marital interactions.Research has found that women’s education levels are positively correlated with marital stability and that husbands’ education levels are not significantly correlated with marital stability.The current study will further determine whether education level can be used as a predictor of marital processes, as measured by wives’ perceptions of various marital interactions. We hypothesize that husbands’ and wives' education attainment levels ...


Religion's Influence On Adolescent's Self-Esteem, Diane M. Bowns, Benjamin R. Malczyk, Rachel Dodge, Randal Day 2010 Brigham Young University

Religion's Influence On Adolescent's Self-Esteem, Diane M. Bowns, Benjamin R. Malczyk, Rachel Dodge, Randal Day

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Self-esteem, or mattering, is important as it has been found to be positively related to things like perceived social support and school performance for adolescents (Elliott, Kao & Grant 2004). We wonder if an adolescent’s self-esteem is specifically affected by his religiosity. Plante and Boccaccini (1997) used the SCSORF Questionnaire and found that stronger faith promoted lighter interpersonal sensitivity, greater belief in personal control and higher self-esteem. Likewise, Ellison (1991) asserts that those with strong religiosity report higher self-esteem; yet Bahr and Martin (1983) report that there was little relationship between religiosity and self-esteem. In our study we test to see if self-esteem is one area in which religion manifests itself positively in the lives of adolescents. We hypothesize that religion will be positively correlated with self-esteem.


Service-Learning In Emerging Adulthood: Positive Development And Outcomes, Katie E. Rasmussen, Larry Nelson, Laura M. Padilla-Walker 2010 Brigham Young University

Service-Learning In Emerging Adulthood: Positive Development And Outcomes, Katie E. Rasmussen, Larry Nelson, Laura M. Padilla-Walker

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

The current study qualitatively examined positive development and outcomes during emerging adulthood specifically in the context of service-learning experience in the Romania International Internship program. We hypothesized that compared with emerging adults who do not participate in service-learning experiences, those who do participate develop more positive outcomes including (1) more positive self-perceptions, (2) greater identity development, and (3) achievement of criteria deemed necessary for adulthood.


Parental Influence In Adult Children’S Marital Relationships, Hsin-Yao Chiu, Jenet Jacob 2010 Brigham Young University

Parental Influence In Adult Children’S Marital Relationships, Hsin-Yao Chiu, Jenet Jacob

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Parents’ couple relationship quality is highly associated with their adult children’s relationship quality with their own partners (Amato & Booth, 2001; Amato & Cheadle, 2005). According to social learning theory, children discover from observing their parents’ interactions that certain behaviors are linked to certain outcomes. They are more willing to follow those behaviors and attitudes which will help them attain their own desired goals (Akers, La Greca, Cochran, & Sellers, 1989; Bandura, 1977; Sellers, Cochran, & Branch, 2005). Drawing on Social Learning theory, the current study uses relationship self-regulation as the measure (Wilson, Charker, Lizzio, Halford and Kimlin, 2005) to understand how specific behavioral efforts could effectively bring about positive outcomes in couple relationships. In addition to behavioral efforts, the current study also uses a measure of “familism” (Schwartz, 2007) to explore how parents’ attitudes towards marriage influence their adult children’s couple relationship quality. The following questions are addressed in the ...


Pathways To Marriage...Or Not: A Study On The Emotions Of Dating In Lds Young Adults, Stephanie L. Standage, Melissa S. Kuhlenhoelter, Thomas B. Holman 2010 Brigham Young University

Pathways To Marriage...Or Not: A Study On The Emotions Of Dating In Lds Young Adults, Stephanie L. Standage, Melissa S. Kuhlenhoelter, Thomas B. Holman

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

The “Pathways To Marriage…Or Not” study was preformed to gain a greater understanding of the dating attitudes and experiences of LDS young adults while dating. It has become apparent through the course of this study that dating has changed from what it has been in the past. We have seen a greater amount of hanging out, and not as much casual dating. We have seen a lot of dissonance between what people say and what they do. We are wondering why this is. Why is it that young adults seem to have a harder time dating these days? We ...


Family-Of-Origin Influence On Relationship Satisfaction In Intercultural Couples, Keitaro Yoshida, Dean Busby 2010 Brigham Young University

Family-Of-Origin Influence On Relationship Satisfaction In Intercultural Couples, Keitaro Yoshida, Dean Busby

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Family-of-origin (FOO) experiences have been found to be associated with later intimate relationship quality (e.g., Larson & Homan, 1994). A few studies with Caucasian samples (e.g., Sabatelli & Bartle-Haring, 2003) have found that female partners’ FOO experience has a stronger impact in that it significantly predicts not only female partners’ own relationship quality, but also that of male partners’ (cross-over effect). However, this cross-over effect was not found in Asian couples (Yoshida & Busby, 2008). Therefore, the current study seeks to better understand the association between FOO experience and later relationship quality by examining the difference between Asian couples, Caucasian couples ...


Grandparent/Grandchild Relationship: Linking Grandparent Involvement To Adolescent Pro-Social Behaviors, Corey Ellis, Marinda Quist, Ruth Robinson, Dara Peterson 2010 Brigham Young University

Grandparent/Grandchild Relationship: Linking Grandparent Involvement To Adolescent Pro-Social Behaviors, Corey Ellis, Marinda Quist, Ruth Robinson, Dara Peterson

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Due to the changing dynamics of family life, there is a current need to understand the grandparent-grandchild relationship. Grandparents today are more involved in the lives of their grandchildren because of increased life expectancy, divorce rates, and dual working homes (Attar-Schwartz, Tan, & Buchanan, 2009).We examined how grandparents’ financial involvement with the family and their emotional closeness to the adolescent (Kemp, 2005) impacts behavioral outcomes. One study shows that a negative grandparent-parent relationship will negatively affect the grandparent-grandchild relationship (Attar-Schwartz, S., Tan, J., & Buchanan, A, 2009). We hypothesize that the financial support of grandparents, grandparent emotional closeness with their grandchildren ...


Hanging Out Among Latter-Day Saint Young Adults: A Qualitative Study, Matthew Call, Michael Richards, Tom B. Holman 2010 Brigham Young University

Hanging Out Among Latter-Day Saint Young Adults: A Qualitative Study, Matthew Call, Michael Richards, Tom B. Holman

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Latter-day Saint (LDS) Church leaders have recently counseled LDS young adults to avoid substituting the practice of hanging out for dating (Oaks 2006, Wickman, 2010). In the face of this counsel, hanging out continues to be a common occurrence. The present study was conducted to better understand why hanging out occurs, how young adults conceptualize it, and what function it serves as a potential pathway to marriage. We believe that hanging out serves two different functions, distinguishable by the intentions of participants and time commitments involved. We have termed “purposive” hanging out as being used to locate and filter potential ...


Marriage, Coparenting, & Family Work Over Time: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis, Adam M. Galovan, Erin K. Holmes 2010 Brigham Young University

Marriage, Coparenting, & Family Work Over Time: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis, Adam M. Galovan, Erin K. Holmes

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 1024 couples), we examined the associations between parenting, similarity in parenting, and emotional intimacy. Mothers’ initial level of family work responsibility was the most significant predictor of emotional intimacy for both Fathers and Mothers. More traditional, adult-centered parenting beliefs were also associated with decreased emotional intimacy for Mothers. Similarity in family work and parenting beliefs showed stability overtime. In general, similarity in parenting and consensus in family work activities was not as significantly associated with emotional intimacy as the individual parenting constructs.


Parental Stress As A Mediator For Relationship Satisfaction And Child Well-Being Between Two Adult Developmental Groups, Heather Perkins, Brian J. Willoughby 2010 Brigham Young University

Parental Stress As A Mediator For Relationship Satisfaction And Child Well-Being Between Two Adult Developmental Groups, Heather Perkins, Brian J. Willoughby

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

In the last 15 years, a new body of research looking at the development of individuals within the age range of 18 to 25 has emerged. Fifty years ago, this developmental period was marked by what are now deemed “adult” responsibilities such as marriage and parenthood. In present times however, we have found that more and more individuals are using this period as a time to obtain an education, and form self identity. Research looking at this population has unearthed distinguishing characteristics that set them apart from other developmental groups (Arnett & Taber, 1994). For emerging adults undergoing the transition to parenthood, the introduction of a child into that self identification process could drastically change the outcomes of that process. The transition to parenthood has been found to be a period marked by rapid identity formation and development (Delmore-Ko, 2001). The impacts on of experiencing these, and the changes associated with emerging adulthood simultaneously could significantly change developmental patterns in both domains. Indeed, individuals going through multiple developmental changes, or whom have increases in role overload, are less likely to successfully navigating the transition to parenthood (Perry-Jenkins, Goldberg, Pierce, Sayer, 2007; Palmer, 2004).


Predictors And Outcomes Of Work-Family Conflict: A U.S. And Singapore Cross-Cultural Comparison, Lydia A. Buswell, Adam M. Galovan, Tamara A. Fackrell, Blake L. Jones 2010 Brigham Young University

Predictors And Outcomes Of Work-Family Conflict: A U.S. And Singapore Cross-Cultural Comparison, Lydia A. Buswell, Adam M. Galovan, Tamara A. Fackrell, Blake L. Jones

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

This paper examines the predictors and outcomes of work-family conflict in a cross-cultural comparison between nationally-representative samples from the United States (N = 1870) and Singapore (N = 1035). As expected, schedule flexibility was positively related to mental health in the United States, but in Singapore the relationship was negative. Likewise, work-to-family conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in the United States, however, it was positively related to marital satisfaction in Singapore. Similarly, family-to-work conflict was positively related to job satisfaction in United States, but was negatively related in Singapore. The findings suggest that theoretical relationships in the work-family interface developed ...


The Impact Of Religiosity On The Drug Use Of High School Athletes: Can Parents Really Make A Difference?, Lance C. Shuldberg, Sarah Coyne 2010 Brigham Young University

The Impact Of Religiosity On The Drug Use Of High School Athletes: Can Parents Really Make A Difference?, Lance C. Shuldberg, Sarah Coyne

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

There are mixed findings on the impact of parents on adolescent drug use. Parents including adolescents in athletic programs reduce some but not all drug use. Parents’ religiosity is the number one predictor of adolescent religiosity.


Eeg Responses Of 5-Month-Old Infants To Static And Dynamic Face-Voice Synchrony, Blake L. Jones, Sarah A. Ahlander, Joan M. Leishman, M. Mangum 2010 Brigham Young University

Eeg Responses Of 5-Month-Old Infants To Static And Dynamic Face-Voice Synchrony, Blake L. Jones, Sarah A. Ahlander, Joan M. Leishman, M. Mangum

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

IntroPrevious behavioral research with faces and voices demonstrates that at an early age infants notice, and prefer, synchrony between faces and voices 1, 2. However, little is known about how infants’ process information regarding face-voice synchronies neurophysiologically. Therefore, Study 1 examined infants’ electrophysiological responses during brief presentation of synchronous, as well as asynchronous, face/voice stimuli.


Parents Raising A Child With Type 1 Diabetes: Experiences And Recommendations For Services, Joan Leishman, Ann Jubber, Colette Dalton, Stacey Mork 2010 Brigham Young University

Parents Raising A Child With Type 1 Diabetes: Experiences And Recommendations For Services, Joan Leishman, Ann Jubber, Colette Dalton, Stacey Mork

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Twenty parents raising a child with type 1 diabetes participated in one hour focus groups. Parents identified challenges related to having a child with diabetes and possible recommendations for services to overcome those challenges.


Positive To Negative Affect, Forgiveness, And Relationship Quality In Married Couples, Rebekah M. Gardner, James Harper 2010 Brigham Young University

Positive To Negative Affect, Forgiveness, And Relationship Quality In Married Couples, Rebekah M. Gardner, James Harper

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Gottman (1999) proposes that a 5:1 ratio of positive to negative behaviors is related to relationship quality. Current study examines forgiveness as a mediating variable. Halchuck et al. (2010) found that couples who recovered from attachment insecurities reported significantly higher levels of forgiveness.


Predicting Dyadic Congruence In Retirement Plans Among Middle-Aged Couples, Benjamin R. Malczyk, Jeremy Yorgason 2010 Brigham Young University

Predicting Dyadic Congruence In Retirement Plans Among Middle-Aged Couples, Benjamin R. Malczyk, Jeremy Yorgason

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Although there are many studies examining couple’s financial preparation for retirement, there are relatively few examining how couples expect to use their time in retirement. This does not undermine the importance of how coupes plan to use their time. Research has shown that leisure time usage was a bigger challenge than finances for retired couples (Henry, Milller, & Giarrusso, 2005).The current study extends previous research by having couples answer an open ended question about their retirement plans and seeing the congruency between planned leisure and time usage by husbands and wives. Specifically this study seeks to answer: 1. What ...


The Positive Effects Of Video Gaming Within Families, Maren K. Christiansen, Sarah Lewis, Jesse Croskrey, Meredith Mehner 2010 Brigham Young University

The Positive Effects Of Video Gaming Within Families, Maren K. Christiansen, Sarah Lewis, Jesse Croskrey, Meredith Mehner

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Although in the past, research on video games has focused on the negative aspects, our study examines the positive influence of video games if used in the right context. Though co-playing, spending time together, and aiming for a common goal, family connectedness and other good outcomes could be expected to increase (Aarsand, 2007). In sum, our study seeks to find any potential for the enhancement of family relationships through the use of video games.


Violence In Children's Popular Television Programs, Victoria Bramwell, Ashley Herr, Christine Sickles, Jessica Kugath 2010 Brigham Young University

Violence In Children's Popular Television Programs, Victoria Bramwell, Ashley Herr, Christine Sickles, Jessica Kugath

FHSS Mentored Research Conference

Previous research done on violence in the media has primarily focused on the effects it has on children. Researchers have tried to prove that children’s viewing of television violence is linked to negative side effects such as encouraging children to imitate their violent acts in social settings (Simmons, Stalsworth and Wentzel, 1999), it’s effects can lead to psychological trauma (Singer, et al., 2004), and even that it can have an impact on a child’s moral reasoning (Krcmar, Viera, 2005). However, little research has been done on how much violence is portrayed in popular television shows and if ...


Working Report #6: Values In Child Welfare Work: Perspectives Of Child Welfare Service Providers In Central And Accessible Service Delivery Models, Nancy Colleen Freymond 2010 Wilfrid Laurier University

Working Report #6: Values In Child Welfare Work: Perspectives Of Child Welfare Service Providers In Central And Accessible Service Delivery Models, Nancy Colleen Freymond

Partnerships for Children and Families Project

This report identifies what service providers across institutional settings say about the values that guide the work that they do with families and children, as well as their perspectives on professional identities and roles in the day to day delivery of child welfare services.


Working Report #8: Services And Supports (Parent Perspectives), Lirondel Hazineh, Gary Cameron, Karen Frensch 2010 Wilfrid Laurier University

Working Report #8: Services And Supports (Parent Perspectives), Lirondel Hazineh, Gary Cameron, Karen Frensch

Partnerships for Children and Families Project

In this study, differences between accessible settings and centralized settings in terms of the range of services and supports that were reported to be available to clients were investigated. The numbers, types and variety of services described differed, as did the amount of advocacy and support in connecting with services. Also, client satisfaction with the services provided appeared to be somewhat different across models.

Number, Types and Variety of Services In accessible settings families were being connected with at least twice as many different services and supports as in the centralized sites. There were a few exceptions to this trend ...


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