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Bibliometric Fingerprints: Name Disambiguation Based On Approximate Structure Equivalence Of Cognitive Maps, Li Tang, John P. Walsh 2009 Georgia Institute of Technology - Main Campus

Bibliometric Fingerprints: Name Disambiguation Based On Approximate Structure Equivalence Of Cognitive Maps, Li Tang, John P. Walsh

Li Tang

Authorship identity has long been an Achilles’ heel in bibliometric analyses at the individual level. This problem appears in studies of scientists’ productivity, inventor mobility and scientific collaboration. Using the concepts of cognitive maps from psychology and approximate structural equivalence from network analysis, we develop a novel algorithm for name disambiguation based on knowledge homogeneity scores. We test it on two cases, and the results show that this approach outperforms other common authorship identification methods with the ASE method providing a relatively simple algorithm that yields higher levels of accuracy with reasonable time demands.


Dissemination Practices In The Spanish Research System: Scientists Trapped In A Golden Cage, Cristobal Torres-Albero, Manuel Fernández-Esquinas, Jesús Rey-Rocha, María José Martín-Sempere 2009 Institute for Advanced Social Studies-IESA, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Dissemination Practices In The Spanish Research System: Scientists Trapped In A Golden Cage, Cristobal Torres-Albero, Manuel Fernández-Esquinas, Jesús Rey-Rocha, María José Martín-Sempere

Manuel Fernández-Esquinas

The aim of this paper is twofold. On the one hand, it offers a systematic analysis of the data available regarding Spanish scientists’ dissemination activities; on the other, it seeks to shed light on their behaviour and motivations. To do this, we consider the context of Spanish society and the conditions affecting the work and professional promotion of scientists. We present evidence from two surveys of CSIC researchers and of participants in Spain’s main science fair, with the caveat that the data were obtained in a methodologically favourable scenario. A contrast exists between scientists’ vocation to disseminate and the ...


High Tech Indicators: Assessing The Competitiveness Of Selected European Countries, david m. johnson, alan l. porter, david roessner, nils c. newman, xiao-yin jin 2009 Georgia Tech

High Tech Indicators: Assessing The Competitiveness Of Selected European Countries, David M. Johnson, Alan L. Porter, David Roessner, Nils C. Newman, Xiao-Yin Jin

alan l porter

Western European nations, along with the United States and Japan, have been recognized as the world’s most competitive economies. Eastern European nations have generally been considered to lag. This paper explores whether these descriptions remain accurate and the prospects for change over the coming decade. The Georgia Tech “High Tech Indicators” (HTI) contribute to the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) Science & Engineering Indicators. We cover 33 highly developed and rapidly industrializing countries. Our model of technological competitiveness contains four components – National Orientation, Socioeconomic Infrastructure, Technological Infrastructure, and Productive Capacity – contributing to “Technological Standing.” We present indicator values, derived ...


Nanotechnology And The International Law Of Weaponry: Towards International Regulation Of Nano-Weapons., Thomas A. Faunce, Hitoshi Nasu 2009 Australian National University

Nanotechnology And The International Law Of Weaponry: Towards International Regulation Of Nano-Weapons., Thomas A. Faunce, Hitoshi Nasu

Thomas A Faunce

The development of nanotechnology for military application is an emerging area of research and development, the pace and extent of which has not been fully anticipated by international legal regulation. Nano-weapons are referred to here as objects and devices using nanotechnology or causing effects in nano-scale that are designed or used for harming humans. Such weapons, despite their controversial human and environmental toxicity, are not comprehensively covered by specific, targeted regulation under international law. This article critically examines current international humanitarian law and arms control law regimes to determine whether significant gaps exist in the regulation of nanotechnology focused on ...


Afterthoughts: Dialogue Between Sugata Mitra And Payal Arora, Sugata Mitra, Payal Arora 2009 Newcastle University

Afterthoughts: Dialogue Between Sugata Mitra And Payal Arora, Sugata Mitra, Payal Arora

Payal Arora

No abstract provided.


Hope-In-The-Wall? A Promise Of Free Learning, Payal Arora 2009 Selected Works

Hope-In-The-Wall? A Promise Of Free Learning, Payal Arora

Payal Arora

Hole-in-the-Wall as a concept has attracted worldwide attention. It involves providing unconditional access to computer-equipped kiosks in playgrounds and out-of-school settings, children taking ownership of their learning and learning driven by the children's natural curiosity. It is posited that this approach, which is being used in India, Cambodia and several countries in Africa, can pave the way for a new education paradigm and be the key to providing literacy and basic education and bridging the digital divide in remote and disadvantaged regions. This paper seeks to establish why two such open access, self-directed and collaborative learning systems failed to ...


Forensic Science Evidence And Judicial Bias In Criminal Cases, Hon. Donald E. Shelton 2009 Eastern Michigan University

Forensic Science Evidence And Judicial Bias In Criminal Cases, Hon. Donald E. Shelton

Hon. Donald E. Shelton

Although DNA exonerations and the NAS report have raised serious questions about the validity of many traditional non-DNA forms of forensic science evidence, criminal court judges continue to admit virtually all prosecution-proferred expert testimony. It is is suggested that this is the result of a systemic pro-prosecution bias by judges that is reflected in admissibility decisions. These "attitudinal blinders" are especially prevalent in state criminal trial and appellate courts.


Impact Of The Australia-Us Free Trade Agreement On Australian Medicines Regulation And Prices, Thomas A. Faunce, James Bai, Duy Nguyen 2009 Australian National University

Impact Of The Australia-Us Free Trade Agreement On Australian Medicines Regulation And Prices, Thomas A. Faunce, James Bai, Duy Nguyen

Thomas A Faunce

The Australia – United States Free Trade Agreement (AUSFTA) came into force on 1 January 2005. Before and subsequently to the AUSFTA being concluded, controversy surrounded the debate over its impact on Australia ’ s health policy, specifically on regulation of pharmaceutical patents and Australia ’ s cost-effectiveness system relating to prescription medicine prices known as the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). This article examines the expectations of both parties in the pharmaceutical sector with regard to the AUSFTA, as well as how successfully they were achieved. It seeks to analyse important relevant outcomes for regulators, the public and pharmaceutical industry, as well as ...


The Innovation System And Innovation Policy In The United States, Philip Shapira, Jan Youtie 2009 University of Manchester; Georgia Institute of Technology

The Innovation System And Innovation Policy In The United States, Philip Shapira, Jan Youtie

Philip Shapira

The US has a highly decentralized and diverse innovation system, involving multiple actors, including branches of federal and state governments, public agencies, universi-ties, the private sector, and non-profit and intermediary organizations. The system combines a high-level of R&D (with basic research sponsored particularly by federal government agencies) and a strong orientation towards applications and the market. This chapter provides an overview of the US innovation system and policy including a discussion of the components and participants involved in the US innovation system and its trends in innovation governance. The focus of this chapter is primarily on innovation policies with ...


Is There A Shift To ‘Active Nanostructures'?, Vrishali Subramanian, Alan L. Porter, Jan Youtie, Philip Shapira 2009 Georgia Institute of Technology

Is There A Shift To ‘Active Nanostructures'?, Vrishali Subramanian, Alan L. Porter, Jan Youtie, Philip Shapira

Philip Shapira

It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology discovery and application is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present increased societal impacts and need new approaches for risk assessment. The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems (ANN) grant solicitation defines an active nanostructure as “An active nanostructure changes or evolves its state during its operation.” Active nanostructures examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This paper considers two questions: (1) Is there a “shift” to active ...


Is There A Shift To ‘Active Nanostructures'?, Vrishali Subramanian, Alan L. Porter, Jan Youtie, Philip Shapira 2009 Georgia Institute of Technology

Is There A Shift To ‘Active Nanostructures'?, Vrishali Subramanian, Alan L. Porter, Jan Youtie, Philip Shapira

Jan Youtie

It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology discovery and application is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present increased societal impacts and need new approaches for risk assessment. The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems (ANN) grant solicitation defines an active nanostructure as “An active nanostructure changes or evolves its state during its operation.” Active nanostructures examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This paper considers two questions: (1) Is there a “shift” to active ...


The Innovation System And Innovation Policy In The United States, Philip Shapira, Jan Youtie 2009 University of Manchester; Georgia Institute of Technology

The Innovation System And Innovation Policy In The United States, Philip Shapira, Jan Youtie

Jan Youtie

The US has a highly decentralized and diverse innovation system, involving multiple actors, including branches of federal and state governments, public agencies, universi-ties, the private sector, and non-profit and intermediary organizations. The system combines a high-level of R&D (with basic research sponsored particularly by federal government agencies) and a strong orientation towards applications and the market. This chapter provides an overview of the US innovation system and policy including a discussion of the components and participants involved in the US innovation system and its trends in innovation governance. The focus of this chapter is primarily on innovation policies with ...


The Neoliberal University And Agricultural Biotechnology: Reports From The Field, Wilhelm Peekhaus 2009 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, School of Information Studies

The Neoliberal University And Agricultural Biotechnology: Reports From The Field, Wilhelm Peekhaus

Wilhelm Peekhaus

Following in the footsteps of a variety of previous research that elaborates on the current state of affairs in academia, this article sets out the argument that neoliberalism and its corresponding iterations of science and technology and research funding policies in this country have implications for the types of knowledge that can be generated within and communicated without contemporary institutions of higher education. Using agricultural biotechnology as the lens through which to focus analysis, the article outlines a number of empirical examples that illustrate how the free flow of knowledge either critical of or not readily appropriated by capital is ...


Regional Development And Interregional Collaboration In The Growth Of Nanotechnology Research In China, Li Tang, Philip Shapira 2009 Georgia Institute of Technology - Main Campus

Regional Development And Interregional Collaboration In The Growth Of Nanotechnology Research In China, Li Tang, Philip Shapira

Li Tang

China is becoming a leading nation in terms of its share of the world’s publications in the emerging nanotechnology domain. This paper demonstrates that the international rise of China’s position in nanotechnology has been underwritten by the emergence of a series of regional hubs of nanotechnology R&D activity within the country. We develop a unique database of Chinese nanotechnology articles covering the period 1990 to mid-2006 to identify the regional distribution of nanotechnology research in China. To build this database, a new approach was developed to clean and standardize the geographical allocation of Chinese publication records. We ...


The Governance Of Problems. Puzzling, Powering, Participation, Robert Hoppe 2009 University of Twente

The Governance Of Problems. Puzzling, Powering, Participation, Robert Hoppe

Robert Hoppe

No abstract provided.


Airport Wildlife Hazard Control, Paul F. Eschenfelder 2009 Embry Riddle Aeronautical University - Daytona Beach

Airport Wildlife Hazard Control, Paul F. Eschenfelder

Paul F. Eschenfelder

No abstract provided.


Juror Expectations For Scientific Evidence In Criminal Cases: Perceptions And Reality About The "Csi Effect" Myth, Hon. Donald E. Shelton 2009 Eastern Michigan University

Juror Expectations For Scientific Evidence In Criminal Cases: Perceptions And Reality About The "Csi Effect" Myth, Hon. Donald E. Shelton

Hon. Donald E. Shelton

This article originated from the author's presentation at the 2010 Cooley Law School Symposium on the "CSI Effect". It reviews the results of two empirical studies of Michigan jurors in diverse jurisdictions, which previously concluded that the "prosecutor version" of the so-called CSI effect cannot be substantiated empirically. The article then describes merged data from the two studies and the analysis of that marged data. The data supports the earlier suggestion of a "tech effect" based on cultural changes, rather than any direct impact from certain television programs or genres. It is suggested that while the prosecutor version of ...


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