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Socio-Spatial Constructs Of The Local Retail Food Environment: A Case Study Of Holyoke, Massachusetts, Walter F. Ramsey 2010 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Socio-Spatial Constructs Of The Local Retail Food Environment: A Case Study Of Holyoke, Massachusetts, Walter F. Ramsey

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

This mixed-methods study addresses the relationship between the availability of food and realized food access by studying the retail food landscape of Holyoke, Massachusetts – a small, socio-economically diverse city. While a large body of empirical research finds that low-income communities and communities of color are especially likely to lack adequate access to healthy foods and experience increased vulnerability to food insecurity, few studies explore urban food environments through a mixed-methods case study approach. Through the use of food store mapping, store audits, and resident interviews, this research is a nascent attempt to articulate how the unique development histories and cultural ...


The Diabetes Primary Prevention Initiative Interventions Focus Area: A Case Study And Recommendations, Deborah S. Porterfield, Laurie Hinnant, David M. Stevens, Ernest Moy, DPPI-IFA Case Study Group 2010 RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC

The Diabetes Primary Prevention Initiative Interventions Focus Area: A Case Study And Recommendations, Deborah S. Porterfield, Laurie Hinnant, David M. Stevens, Ernest Moy, Dppi-Ifa Case Study Group

Health Policy and Management Faculty Publications

Background: In 2005, CDC began the Diabetes Primary Prevention Initiative Interventions Focus Area (DPPI-IFA), which funded fıve state Diabetes Prevention and Control Programs (DPCPs) to translate diabetes primary prevention trials into real-world settings by developing and implementing a framework for state-level diabetes primary prevention.

Purpose: The purpose of this case study, conducted in 2007, was to describe DPPI-IFA implementation, including facilitators and challenges to the initiative. Methods: Case studies of the fıve DPCPs in the DPPI-IFA involving site visits with key informant interviews of state staff and partners and archival record collection.

Results: Partners recruited for DPPI-IFA activities included local ...


Photovoice As Authentic Civic Engagement: Lessons Learned In One Immigrant Community, Meg Merrick, Angie Mejia 2010 Portland State University

Photovoice As Authentic Civic Engagement: Lessons Learned In One Immigrant Community, Meg Merrick, Angie Mejia

Institute of Portland Metropolitan Studies Publications

It is widely acknowledged that equitable and sustainable public policy can only be achieved when it is informed by the concerns, hopes, and experiences of those who are affected. Public agencies wishing to engage recent immigrants can find this to be challenging, however. Effective public participation and civic engagement can be difficult when community members cannot speak English and/or come from very different cultural and political environments. The Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CDPP) of the Multnomah County Health Department and Metro, two public agencies serving the Portland, Oregon region, have actively sought to learn from the experiences of immigrant ...


Governing The Infections Bacteria Commons: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance, Christopher R. M. Pilch 2010 University of Washington Tacoma

Governing The Infections Bacteria Commons: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance, Christopher R. M. Pilch

Global Honors Theses

In recent decades, concerns have arisen over the misuse of antibiotics and the resultant increase in ever-more resilient strains of pathogenic bacteria. The author examines this issue through the lens of common pool resource theory, which frames a case study comparison between the United States and the Netherlands and their respective antibiotic distribution practices. The results of the case study offer insights into how the United States can better manage its antibiotic and public health policies.


The Role Of Medicaid In Promoting Access To High-Quality, High-Value Maternity Care, Anne R. Markus, Sara J. Rosenbaum 2010 George Washington University

The Role Of Medicaid In Promoting Access To High-Quality, High-Value Maternity Care, Anne R. Markus, Sara J. Rosenbaum

Health Policy and Management Faculty Publications

The main purpose of this article is to analyze and describe the role of Medicaid in facilitating access to care for pregnant women and ensuring high-quality maternity care that is affordable. It first summarizes the federal Medicaid requirements regarding eligibility, coverage of benefits, financing, and service delivery, with a special emphasis on existing quality provisions. Then, it discusses current issues and recommends several Medicaid reforms, particularly in the area of quality assessment and improvement. All reforms, including Medicaid reforms, should seek to support the IOM-identified aims. Much of the emphais in Medicaid policy development has been focused on access to ...


Issues In The Recruitment And Retention Of Aboriginal Health Research Participants In Canada, Victoria Nadalin, Marion Maar, Fred Ashbury, John McLaughlin 2010 Western University

Issues In The Recruitment And Retention Of Aboriginal Health Research Participants In Canada, Victoria Nadalin, Marion Maar, Fred Ashbury, John Mclaughlin

Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)

No abstract provided.


Contrasting Policies And Administration Of Sexually Transmitted Infection Programs In Saskatchewan First Nations And Alaska Native Communities, Rick Kotowich, Mike Fisher 2010 Western University

Contrasting Policies And Administration Of Sexually Transmitted Infection Programs In Saskatchewan First Nations And Alaska Native Communities, Rick Kotowich, Mike Fisher

Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)

No abstract provided.


Greg Shaw, Charlie Schlenker (Interviewer) 2010 WGLT

Greg Shaw, Charlie Schlenker (Interviewer)

Interviews for WGLT

Charlie Schlenker of WGLT interviews Professor of Political Science Greg Shaw about his book, The Healthcare Debate. (requires RealPlayer)


From Displacement To Internment: A Report Of Human Rights Violations Experienced By L.A.'S South Asian Immigrant Population, Susan Alva 2010 Occidental College

From Displacement To Internment: A Report Of Human Rights Violations Experienced By L.A.'S South Asian Immigrant Population, Susan Alva

UEP Faculty & UEPI Staff Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Gendered Disparities In Take-Ups Of Employee Health Benefits, Jennifer Reid Keene, Anastasia H. Prokos 2010 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Gendered Disparities In Take-Ups Of Employee Health Benefits, Jennifer Reid Keene, Anastasia H. Prokos

Sociology Faculty Publications

Using a sample of 2,271 workers from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce whose employers offered personal health insurance, this article investigates the gendered nature of health insurance benefit take-ups. These analyses include family and employment characteristics in addition to employers’ contributions to health insurance premiums, a measure that is unexamined in sociological analyses of health benefits. Progressive logistic regression models predict the effects of gender and family characteristics. Results indicate that women with employed spouses are less likely to take up their own health benefits than are comparable men, net of basic employment characteristics. Gender differences ...


Can The Deployment Of Community Health Workers For The Delivery Of Hiv Services Represent An Effective And Sustainable Response To Health Workforce Shortages? Results Of A Multicountry Study, Francesca Celletti, Anna Wright, John Palen, Seble Frehywot, Anne R. Markus, Alan E. Greenberg, Rafael Augusto Teixeira de Aguiar, Francisco Campos, Eric Buch, Badara Samb 2010 World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland

Can The Deployment Of Community Health Workers For The Delivery Of Hiv Services Represent An Effective And Sustainable Response To Health Workforce Shortages? Results Of A Multicountry Study, Francesca Celletti, Anna Wright, John Palen, Seble Frehywot, Anne R. Markus, Alan E. Greenberg, Rafael Augusto Teixeira De Aguiar, Francisco Campos, Eric Buch, Badara Samb

Health Policy and Management Faculty Publications

In countries severely affected by HIV/AIDS, shortages of health workers present a major obstacle to scaling up HIV services. Adopting a task shifting approach for the deployment of community health workers (CHWs) represents one strategy for rapid expansion of the health workforce. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of CHWs with a focus on identifying the critical elements of an enabling environment that can ensure they provide quality services in a manner that is sustainable. The method of work included a collection of primary data in five countries: Brazil, Ethiopia, Malawi, Namibia, and Uganda. The findings show that ...


Fragmentation In Mental Health Benefits And Services: A Preliminary Examination Into Consumption And Outcomes, Barak D. Richman, Daniel Grossman, Frank Sloan 2010 Duke Law School

Fragmentation In Mental Health Benefits And Services: A Preliminary Examination Into Consumption And Outcomes, Barak D. Richman, Daniel Grossman, Frank Sloan

Faculty Scholarship

In this chapter, we examine consumption patterns and health outcomes within a health insurance system in which mental health benefits are administered under a carved-out insurance plan. Using a comprehensive dataset of health claims, including insurance claims for both mental and physical health services, we examine both heterogeneity of consumption and variation in outcomes. Consumption variation addresses the regularly overlooked question of how equal insurance and access does not translate into equitable consumption. Outcomes variation yields insights into the potential harms of disparate consumption and of uncoordinated care. We find that even when insurance and access are held constant, consumption ...


Student Perspective: Margaret Chase Smith Library 2010 Student Essay Contest, David Richards, Kacie Ruoux 2010 Margaret Chase Smith Library

Student Perspective: Margaret Chase Smith Library 2010 Student Essay Contest, David Richards, Kacie Ruoux

Maine Policy Review

Each year the Margaret Chase Smith Library sponsors an essay contest for Maine high school seniors. The topic for 2010 was national health care, which has been part of public policy considerations since the end of World War II. In light of the current debate, students were invited to offer their opinions on what they think ought to be done to reform and improve the American medical system. We feature here the first place prize winning essay by Kacie Rioux, “Healthcare Reform for a New Era,” introduced by David Richards of the Margaret Chase Smith Library.


Lifetime Health Consequences Of Child Labor In Brazil, Chanyoung Lee, Peter F. Orazem 2010 Iowa State University

Lifetime Health Consequences Of Child Labor In Brazil, Chanyoung Lee, Peter F. Orazem

Economics Publications

The health consequences of child labor may take time to manifest themselves. This study examines whether children who began working at a young age experience increased incidence of illness or physical disability as adults. When child labor and schooling are treated as chosen without consideration of unobserved abilities or health endowments, child labor appears to have small adverse effects on a wide variety of health measures. Some adverse health consequences such as heart disease or hypertension seem unlikely to be caused by child labor. However, when we allow unobserved health and ability endowments to alter the age of labor market ...


More Than Just Food: The Diverse Effects Of Food Assistance Programs, Helen H. Jensen, Parke E. Wilde 2010 Iowa State University

More Than Just Food: The Diverse Effects Of Food Assistance Programs, Helen H. Jensen, Parke E. Wilde

Economics Publications

For decades, from the 1940s to the 1970s, the goal of U.S. food and nutrition assistance programs seemed clear: to make sure low-income Americans could afford enough food. By pursuing this goal, the programs would protect program participants from hunger and also support demand for farm products. Today, about one in five Americans receives benefits from at least one of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) food programs. The major programs include the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), school meals programs—lunch and breakfast, and the Child ...


Avoiding Tough Policy Choices In An Influenza Pandemic: The Role Of Kettl's Rocket Science Model In Public Health, Danny Lambert 2010 University of Denver

Avoiding Tough Policy Choices In An Influenza Pandemic: The Role Of Kettl's Rocket Science Model In Public Health, Danny Lambert

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The security and social inequality approaches to public health present distinct answers to policy objectives relative to a pandemic. However, each approach leaves us with tough choices between the most valued objectives. I demonstrate how the networked approach, which Kettl's Rocket Science Model (RSM) exemplifies, does not leave us with such choices. Furthermore, I connect the epidemiological concepts public health practitioners apply toward communicable disease pandemics to RSM concepts. Finally, drawing on the disease parameters of a worst-case scenario influenza pandemic, I demonstrate how the networked approach helps public health practitioners expand capacity such that tough choices are unnecessary.


Understanding School Travel: How Residential Location Choice And The Built Environment Affect Trips To School, Yizhao Yang, Marc Schlossberg, Robert Parker, Bethany Johnson 2010 University of Oregon

Understanding School Travel: How Residential Location Choice And The Built Environment Affect Trips To School, Yizhao Yang, Marc Schlossberg, Robert Parker, Bethany Johnson

TREC Final Reports

This project investigates issues related to parents’ decisions about children’s school transportation. This has become an important area of research due to the growing concerns that increased reliance on private automobile in school travel has led to adverse health impacts on children and negative impacts on environment. This study examines school transportation in the context of where families live and how families make decisions about school travel in the process of choosing their residence.

Using a middle-sized school district in Oregon State, we conducted a 5500-household survey and a number of interviews and focus groups. The study shows that ...


Oil And Water: Mixing Individual Mandates, Fragmented Markets, And Health Reform, Allison K. Hoffman 2010 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Oil And Water: Mixing Individual Mandates, Fragmented Markets, And Health Reform, Allison K. Hoffman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

With momentum toward national health reform, there is wide support for legislation to include an individual mandate that would require all Americans to carry health insurance. Discussion of the individual mandate has relied largely on whether the mandate will generate universal coverage as a gauge for success. This article challenges the notion that an individual mandate is successful if it leads to universal coverage, revealing a critical problem the individual mandate will face even if all Americans were to have health insurance. To uncover this problem, this article sets out a novel framework that disentangles the three different policy objectives ...


Allowing Patients To Waive The Right To Sue For Medical Malpractice: A Response To Thaler And Sunstein, Tom Baker, Timothy D. Lytton 2010 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Allowing Patients To Waive The Right To Sue For Medical Malpractice: A Response To Thaler And Sunstein, Tom Baker, Timothy D. Lytton

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This essay critically evaluates Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein’s proposal to allow patients to prospectively waive their rights to bring a malpractice claim, presented in their recent, much acclaimed book, Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth and Happiness. We show that the behavioral insights that undergird Nudge do not support the waiver proposal. In addition, we demonstrate that Thaler and Sunstein have not provided a persuasive cost-benefit justification for the proposal. Finally, we argue that their liberty-based defense of waivers rests on misleading analogies and polemical rhetoric that ignore the liberty and other interests served by patients’ tort law ...


Tontines For The Invincibles: Enticing Low Risks Into The Health-Insurance Pool With An Idea From Insurance History And Behavioral Economics, Tom Baker, Peter Siegelman 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Tontines For The Invincibles: Enticing Low Risks Into The Health-Insurance Pool With An Idea From Insurance History And Behavioral Economics, Tom Baker, Peter Siegelman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Over one third of the uninsured adults in the U.S. below retirement age are between 19 and 29 years old. Young adults, especially men, often go without insurance, even when buying it is mandatory and sometimes even when it is a low cost employment benefit. This paper proposes a new form of health insurance targeted at this group—the “Young Invincibles”—those who (wrongly) believe that they don’t need health insurance because they won’t get sick. Our proposal offers a cash bonus to those who turn out to be right in their belief that they did not ...


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