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Image Memory For Hyperpalatable Foods In University Aged Females, Leila M. Mackay 2017 Brescia University

Image Memory For Hyperpalatable Foods In University Aged Females, Leila M. Mackay

Brescia Psychology Undergraduate Honours Theses

Hyperpalatable foods are high in sugar and/or fat and highly processed. These foods increase dopamine in the brain similar to other rewards, such as drugs of abuse, producing pleasure and an enhanced drive to consume them. Undergraduate students (n = 44) completed an explicit memory task where they were asked if they recalled various types of food (high sugar, high fat, sugar+fat, fruits, vegetables and breads) and non-food images. Questionnaires evaluating eating patterns were also completed. It was hypothesized that hyperpalatable foods would be recalled better and faster than less-palatable foods or non-food images. The study found that hyperpalatable ...


The Relationship Between Way-Finding Strategies, Spatial Anxiety, And Prior Experiences, Megan E. Martin 2017 Brescia University

The Relationship Between Way-Finding Strategies, Spatial Anxiety, And Prior Experiences, Megan E. Martin

Brescia Psychology Undergraduate Honours Theses

Spatial activities during childhood and adolescence are believed to play a role in the development of spatial cognitive abilities. The current study investigated the relationship between spatial activities, way-finding strategy preferences, and spatial anxiety in a sample of 89 female undergraduate students from Brescia University College. Participants completed four online questionnaires addressing childhood spatial activities, adolescent spatial activities, spatial anxiety, and way-finding strategy. Individuals who reported more participation in childhood and adolescent activities reported using a cognitive map way-finding strategy, but the amount of participation in spatial activities reported by an individual did not relate to their use of a ...


Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation To Assess Motor System Excitability Fluctuations During Auditory Anticipation And Beat Perception, Johannes G.P Teselink 2017 Western University

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation To Assess Motor System Excitability Fluctuations During Auditory Anticipation And Beat Perception, Johannes G.P Teselink

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Humans tend to spontaneously move to the regular beat of musical rhythm. Beat perception is the tendency to sense and anticipate the regular time positions (beats) that movements synchronize with. The neural motor system plays an important role in beat perception, but the dynamics of excitability in the motor system associated with beat perception have not been characterized. This project investigated motor system excitability fluctuations using transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography during perception of beat-based and non-beat-based rhythms. We applied single-pulse TMS over the left primary motor cortex of healthy participants as they listened to three types of rhythms that ...


Achieving And Maintaining Flow During Practice And Performance, Jenna Klein 2017 University of Northern Iowa

Achieving And Maintaining Flow During Practice And Performance, Jenna Klein

Annual Graduate Student Symposium

Flow, also referred to as being “in the zone,” is a state of total absorption in an activity where an individual’s risk and skill are in balance. This mental state is sought after by many musicians for its positive effect on performance. Flow has been described as leading to a loss of self-awareness, changes in the perception of time, the ability to play effortlessly, a sense of calm, and confidence. Flow is characterized by changes in brain function. Complete, undistracted concentration on one activity allows the left, more analytical side of the brain to rest, while the right, more ...


Body Language In The Classroom: Effects Of Gesturing, maia Rolfe 2017 Murray State University

Body Language In The Classroom: Effects Of Gesturing, Maia Rolfe

Scholars Week

Body Language in the Classroom: Effects of Gesturing

This study was designed to give some insights into how body language could interact with teaching. This study tested if active gesturing (pointing) had an effect on the amount of a story that was remembered and on how likable someone who is presenting the story was perceived as being. Male and female participants watched a female presenter read a short story projected on a screen while either pointing to key words or not pointing. Then they wrote down as much of the story as they could remember and rated the likeability of ...


Same Words, Different Impressions: How Accent Upstages Words In Communication, Alexandria Farris 2017 Murray State University

Same Words, Different Impressions: How Accent Upstages Words In Communication, Alexandria Farris

Scholars Week

The current study investigated how different non-native accents of English are perceived. A person's accent can be used to take the place of the individual's race or any other marker used to make judgements (Shuck, 2006). Participants listened to a recording of one out of five non-American female speakers of English from Mexico, Russia, Germany, India, or China, or a female native speaker of American English; the participants heard either a formal or informal text and then evaluated the speaker on factors of competence, caring/goodwill, and trustworthiness. Demographic data on age, gender, languages spoken, extent travelled, and ...


Spar - Positive Intervention Application Plan For Ashoka University, Erin Griffin, Dwight Jaggard, Glory Singh, Jessica Turak 2017 University of Pennsylvania

Spar - Positive Intervention Application Plan For Ashoka University, Erin Griffin, Dwight Jaggard, Glory Singh, Jessica Turak

Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) Service Learning Projects

Ashoka University, a distinguished liberal arts university that is the intellectual home to over 900 hundred undergraduate and graduate students in Sonepat, India. We present here a program to enhance well-being based on the fundamentals of positive psychology. The program can start with a pilot and then be scaled using either trained professionals or trained peer counselors. The components of the program include strengths, positive relationships, attention and resilience thus forming the acronym SPAR. We have designed the program to take place in four 90-minute sessions ideal for the Young India Fellowship Fellows schedule of five-week ...


Cooperation Via Communication: Influencing Vocal Alignment In Conversation, Elliot A. Pollack 2017 Trinity College, Hartford Connecticut

Cooperation Via Communication: Influencing Vocal Alignment In Conversation, Elliot A. Pollack

Senior Theses and Projects

Alignment of human behavior is a well-documented phenomenon, however, the factors which influence its direction and magnitude are not firmly established. Conversational partners align on a variety of speech factors including word choice, syntax, and rate of speech. The present study examines factors which lead to alignment of fundamental frequency (F0), colloquially known as pitch. Subjects (Speakers) complete a puzzle task which requires them to communicate with a partner (Model). The Model’s F0 is manipulated to either converge towards or diverge from that of the Speaker, whereas a control condition does not change the Model voice. The Speaker is ...


The Neurometric Correlates Of Trauma Using The Brief Neurometric Battery (Bnb), Lauren N. Dybel 2017 College of William and Mary

The Neurometric Correlates Of Trauma Using The Brief Neurometric Battery (Bnb), Lauren N. Dybel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Objective: The goal of this research was to determine the utility of a novel Brief Neurometric Battery (BNB) (Kieffaber et al., 2016) for measuring the neurometric correlates of a) experiences with sexual trauma and b) personality characteristics, and to assess the correlation of sexual trauma with event-related potentials derived through EEG.
Methods: The BNB testing battery uses a nested array of visual and auditory stimuli to elicit several event-related potentials (ERPs) and oscillatory activity in about 20 minutes. This subclinical study at the College of William & Mary used the BNB with college-aged women with past experiences of sexual violence. Participants ...


Law And Identifiability, Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir, Ilana Ritov, Tehila Kogut 2017 Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Law And Identifiability, Daphna Lewinsohn-Zamir, Ilana Ritov, Tehila Kogut

Indiana Law Journal

Psychological studies have shown that people react either more generously or more punitively toward identified individuals than toward unidentified ones. This phenomenon, named the identifiability effect, has received little attention in the legal literature, despite its importance for the law. As a prime example, while legislators typically craft rules that would apply to unidentified people, judges ordinarily deal with identified individuals. The identifiability effect suggests that the outcomes of these two forms of lawmaking may differ, even when they pertain to similar facts and situations.

This Article is a preliminary investigation into the relevance of the identifiability effect for law ...


Objective And Subjective Influences On Cognitive Performance In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes, Natalie E. Benjamin 2017 Marquette University

Objective And Subjective Influences On Cognitive Performance In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes, Natalie E. Benjamin

Master's Theses (2009 -)

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an increasingly common chronic illness in children and adolescents that can result in short- and long-term health complications. Disease management can be a particular challenge for adolescents seeking autonomy from caregivers. Recently, there has been a significant increase in adolescents’ use of diabetes-related technology to aid in blood glucose (BG) management and insulin administration. Individuals with T1DM also experience symptoms related to their BG levels, and these symptoms can serve as indicators of out-of-range BG levels and guide management decisions. Although research shows that diabetes-related health factors can affect cognitive functioning, no existing research ...


Effect Of Student Classroom Cell Phone Usage On Teachers, Daniel Pulliam 2017 Western Kentucky University

Effect Of Student Classroom Cell Phone Usage On Teachers, Daniel Pulliam

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

The increase in student cell phone use in classrooms has led to a decrease in academic performance and satisfaction with instruction (Dietz & Henrich, 2014). Currently, it is unknown as to whether student classroom cell phone usage has any effect on the teacher. The purpose of this study was to determine student and teacher opinions of classroom cell phone usage and perceived distraction. Surveys were conducted with a sample of college students (N = 163) and college faculty (N = 289), from a university in the Southeastern region of the United States. Data indicate there are differing opinions on classroom cell phone usage between students and teachers. Results revealed teachers believe significantly more than students that cell phones should not be used during class. A majority of teachers also reported they have been distracted by students using their phones, while only about half of the students believe their teachers have been distracted by cell phones. Students using cell phones during class may affect more than just their individual academic performance; student cell phone use may actually have a negative impact on the entire class and the quality of teaching.


Intelligent Tutoring System Using Decision Based Learning For Thermodynamic Phase Diagrams, Matthew Hagge, Mostafa Amin-Naseri, John K. Jackman, Enruo Guo, Stephen B. Gilbert, Gloria Starns, LeAnn Faidley 2017 Iowa State University

Intelligent Tutoring System Using Decision Based Learning For Thermodynamic Phase Diagrams, Matthew Hagge, Mostafa Amin-Naseri, John K. Jackman, Enruo Guo, Stephen B. Gilbert, Gloria Starns, Leann Faidley

Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Publications

Students learn when they connect new information to existing understanding or when they modify existing understanding to accept new information. Most current teaching methods focus on trying to get students to solve problems in a manner identical to that of an expert. This study investigates the effectiveness of assessing student understanding related to context specific problem solving decisions, prescribing feedback based on the assessment, and improving student understanding to the point where they can make correct decisions. Students were given a refrigeration problem unlike their prior problems and were asked to draw the cycle on a T-v diagram using a ...


Can You See It? Facial Expression Leakage In Response To Emotional Intensity, Samuel Ault Jens 2017 College of William and Mary

Can You See It? Facial Expression Leakage In Response To Emotional Intensity, Samuel Ault Jens

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Do we see every facial expression from people with whom we come into contact? By replicating an experiment by Porter, ten Brinke, and Wallace (2011), this scaled-down study examined if high-intensity images elicit incorrect emotional “leakage” in participants’ facial expressions. The idea facial expressions may not be fully consciously controlled emerged from Darwin’s (1872) “inhibition hypothesis.” Some facial expressions are too intense to voluntarily control, and thus cannot be fully controlled at all times. In the present study, 21 participants were asked to perform facial expressions (reflecting happiness, sadness, and fear) while viewing a series of images that varied ...


The Paradox Of Imprecision In Language, Henry R. Bauer 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Paradox Of Imprecision In Language, Henry R. Bauer

Essays of Significance

The Paradox of Imprecision in Language

Abstract

This paper investigates philosophical questions bearing on the relationship between language and mind, through an analysis of the phenomenon of “efficient imprecision” in language. It is argued that language users’ ability to intuitively connect allegedly imprecise linguistic expressions with definite conceptual information presents a paradox that might lead philosophers, linguists and cognitive scientists alike to reconsider the relationship between the computational machinery of human language and its function as the vehicle of conscious thought.

Like the puzzle about the identity relation which Gottlob Frege presents in the seminal Sense and Reference (1892), which ...


Contemplative Pedagogy & Mindfulness For Librarians, Sara Smith, Madeleine K. Charney 2017 Amherst College

Contemplative Pedagogy & Mindfulness For Librarians, Sara Smith, Madeleine K. Charney

Madeleine K. Charney

This retreat was an opportunity for Five College library staff to learn more about contemplative pedagogy, programming, spaces, and professional development, as well as practice mindfulness techniques for personal and professional wellness. Friday, March 31, 9:30AM - 1:00PM at the W.E.B. DuBois Library, UMass Amherst.


Marital Satisfaction: The Role Of Post-Formal Thought And Partner Blame, Kendall Jory, Cindy Miller-Perrin, Dr. Janet Trammell 2017 Seaver College

Marital Satisfaction: The Role Of Post-Formal Thought And Partner Blame, Kendall Jory, Cindy Miller-Perrin, Dr. Janet Trammell

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

Post-formal thought, a recently identified fifth stage of developmental cognition, is a type of complex cognition initially present in emerging adulthood. It is more practical, flexible and dialectical than previous stages of cognition. Research has suggested the benefits of enhanced post-formal thought in intrapersonal functioning, as well as interpersonal functioning. In interpersonal functioning, social relationships provide an opportunity to think using post-formal cognition because two people often share different “truths” in a relationship which creates logical conflict that must be resolved to continue the relationship (Griffin et al, 2009). Using this framework, the current study aimed to further examine the ...


The Relationship Between Extraversion And Listening Comprehension Under High And Low-Salience Visual Distraction Conditions, Nicole Virzi, Steve Rouse, CIndy Miller-Perrin 2017 Pepperdine University

The Relationship Between Extraversion And Listening Comprehension Under High And Low-Salience Visual Distraction Conditions, Nicole Virzi, Steve Rouse, Cindy Miller-Perrin

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

The proposed study contributes to the pool of research examining the link between level of extraversion and sensory stimulation. Numerous studies have shown that introverts are more susceptible to forms of auditory distraction than extraverts when completing cognitive tasks requiring visual attention, but no study has examined the opposite relationship: the differing effects of visual distraction on auditory comprehension amongst introverts and extraverts. Using undergraduate college students as participants, this study tested three hypotheses: 1) there will be a negative correlation between level of extraversion and self-reported distraction while under high-salience visual distraction, 2) there will be a positive correlation ...


Using Low-Stakes Repeated Testing Can Improve Student Learning: How (Some) Practice Makes Perfect, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto, Patrick D.K. Watson 2017 Parkland College

Using Low-Stakes Repeated Testing Can Improve Student Learning: How (Some) Practice Makes Perfect, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto, Patrick D.K. Watson

Aya Shigeto

Two studies in Introductory Psychology classes explored whether repeated low-stakes testing can augment learning. In Experiment 1, answering more in-class questions with student response systems (SRSs) predicted better learning when students had not read the text. In Experiment 2, taking online practice quizzes predicted better learning, especially when questions on a concept were grouped. Repeated low-stakes testing can aid learning, but we must develop evidence-based pedagogical tools to maximize effects.


Practice Makes Perfect: Improving Learning Of At-Risk Students, Patrick D.K. Watson, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto 2017 Parkland College

Practice Makes Perfect: Improving Learning Of At-Risk Students, Patrick D.K. Watson, Sarah Grison, Steven G. Luke, Aya Shigeto

Aya Shigeto

29 graduate TAs and 1 faculty member teach 2700 Introductory Psychology students annually. This year we developed an assessment program to improve student learning and graduate teaching training (Shigeto et al., 2010). We studied the value of pedagogical tools developed for students in the Educational Opportunities Program (EOP). EOP selects students based on demographics and academic vulnerabilities for a special intro psych section. This section has an extra day per week for content presentation and additional student development support. These interventions have been demonstrated to enhance learning in minority students (Treisman, 1992).


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