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Overparenting And Young Adult Narcissism: Psychological Control And Interpersonal Dependency As Mediators, Nathan Alexander Winner 2019 University of Southern Mississippi

Overparenting And Young Adult Narcissism: Psychological Control And Interpersonal Dependency As Mediators, Nathan Alexander Winner

Dissertations

Overparenting, or “helicopter parenting,” is a unique style of parenting characterized by parents’ well-intentioned but age-inappropriate over-involvement and intrusiveness in their children’s lives. Recent research has linked overparenting to the development of narcissistic traits in young adults, although the mechanisms of this relationship remain unclear. Two plausible mechanisms include the parenting behavior of psychological control and the increased interpersonal dependency of the child. Psychological control is a construct that overlaps with overparenting and has been linked to both dependent and narcissistic traits. Similarly, interpersonal dependency is a key predictor of narcissistic traits. Therefore, the present study sought to examine ...


Family Entropy: Understanding The Organization Of The Home Environment And Impact On Health Behaviors And Weight In School-Age Children, Carolyn Bates 2019 Children's Mercy Kansas City

Family Entropy: Understanding The Organization Of The Home Environment And Impact On Health Behaviors And Weight In School-Age Children, Carolyn Bates

Research Days

No abstract provided.


Measuring Clinical Weight Loss In Young Children With Severe Obesity: Comparison Of Outcomes Using Zbmi, Modified Zbmi, And Percent Of 95th Percentile, Carolyn Bates 2019 Children's Mercy Kansas City

Measuring Clinical Weight Loss In Young Children With Severe Obesity: Comparison Of Outcomes Using Zbmi, Modified Zbmi, And Percent Of 95th Percentile, Carolyn Bates

Research Days

No abstract provided.


Associations Between Weight Perception, Weight Management Behavior, And Suicidal Behaviors Among Gender Diverse Youth, Jon Poquiz 2019 Children's Mercy Kansas City

Associations Between Weight Perception, Weight Management Behavior, And Suicidal Behaviors Among Gender Diverse Youth, Jon Poquiz

Research Days

No abstract provided.


Executive Function And Motor Skills In Preschool Children, Meggin Kelley 2019 Otterbein University

Executive Function And Motor Skills In Preschool Children, Meggin Kelley

Distinction Papers

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a short-term motor program on the executive function and motor skills in preschool children utilizing a Pretest and Post test design. The present study was designed with two periods of program intervention- once in the fall and once in the spring. It was hypothesized that a 10-week motor intervention would demonstrate positive motor and executive function gains in the experimental (motor) group. Children ranging from 4 to 6 years of age participated in this study. Baseline motor and executive function scores were obtained during the Pretest phase. Subsequently ...


Perceived Workload In High School Students, Emmaly Baker, Emmaly Baker 2019 Otterbein University

Perceived Workload In High School Students, Emmaly Baker, Emmaly Baker

Distinction Papers

The proposed study extended the findings of Laurie-Rose and her colleagues (2017) examining workload in children. The goal of the study was to effectively use an interactive technology—Mentimeter—to assess workload. The study employed two cognitive tasks, the Symbol-Digit Substitution and the d2 test of attention to determine whether or not students can discriminate the demands of tasks with objectively different workload profiles. The study further examined the role of Executive Function with these cognitive tasks. Workload ratings were consistent with objective demands of the task, suggesting that Mentimeter may be a valuable tool to administer workload assessments in ...


Children’S Evaluations Of Excluding An In-Group Member Who Help An Out-Group, Janel Cuevas, Lily Samiee, Makeda Mayes, Annabelle Farina, Santiago Gonzalez, Ariel Kasoff, Sabrina Ortiz, Aline Hitti Dr. 2019 University of San Francisco

Children’S Evaluations Of Excluding An In-Group Member Who Help An Out-Group, Janel Cuevas, Lily Samiee, Makeda Mayes, Annabelle Farina, Santiago Gonzalez, Ariel Kasoff, Sabrina Ortiz, Aline Hitti Dr.

Creative Activity and Research Day - CARD

What factors contribute to children’s exclusion of in-group members? Past research indicates that children and adolescents are often not willing to exclude in-group members, but might be more willing if in-group members challenged moral group norms (Hitti, Mulvey, Rutland, Abrams, & Killen, 2013). Additionally, it has been found that while children are more likely to help an in-group member but are willing to help an out-group member if they are in need (Sierksma, Thijs, and Verkuyten, 2015). Less is known about exclusion of in-group members who help out-groups in ways that come at a cost to one’s own group. The current study examined evaluations of excluding an in-group member who helps an out-group equally, a little, and a lot when the in-group had varying levels of need for a necessary resource

This study examined 174 responses from children (4th graders) and adolescents (8th graders) (M = 11.10, SD = 1.94), using three vignettes in which each group had varying levels of need for water: 1) both groups need the same, 2) in-group needs more water, and 3) out-group needs more water. Each participant received a scenario in which an in-group member either helped the out-group by distributing found water in ways such that he/she: 1) helped each group equally; 2) helped the out-group less than the in-group; and 3) helped the out-group more than the in-group. Three linear regression model were analyzed, for each need level, with approval of exclusion (“How okay or not okay do you think it is that the group decides that they do not want Sam in the group anymore?”, 1 = Really Not Okay ...


The Art Of Learning, Richard Rolapp 2019 Brigham Young University

The Art Of Learning, Richard Rolapp

Marriott Student Review

No abstract provided.


Child Poverty, Physical & Mental Health In Maine, Katelyn Malloy 2019 University of Southern Maine

Child Poverty, Physical & Mental Health In Maine, Katelyn Malloy

Thinking Matters Symposium

Children who live below the national poverty line account for nearly one fifth of Maine’s overall population. Child poverty is a determinant of health that can lead to negative health outcomes that affect childhood development, educational achievement, as well as physical and mental health. The purpose of this study was to identify five Maine counties with the highest rates of child poverty according to the national average. Comparison of poverty rates between counties were analyzed along with two leading health indicators – mental and physical distress. This study used 2016 county-level childhood poverty estimates, assessed by the American Community Survey ...


Forgotten Children & Bonds That Heal: The Critical Nature Of Attachment, August Ashbaker 2019 Lesley University

Forgotten Children & Bonds That Heal: The Critical Nature Of Attachment, August Ashbaker

Lesley University Community of Scholars Day

Human attachment is one of the most critical factors in proper neurological and physiological development. Attachment is built through the mutuality of emotional impact, as well as the regular reception of physical touch. Infants and children who have been deprived of these vital necessities through the lacking initiatives of their caregivers—through neglect—display visible signs of its physiological, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral impact. Research has found neglect to be the highest risk factor for permanent damage to brain development in comparison to other forms of complex trauma (i.e. chronic caregiver interpersonal trauma in childhood); it is also the ...


Experiences Of Social Inclusion And Exclusion Of Deaf Children, Nicole R. Hiebert 2019 The University of Western Ontario

Experiences Of Social Inclusion And Exclusion Of Deaf Children, Nicole R. Hiebert

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Previous research describes how Deaf children are at risk for being socially excluded from their hearing peers in mainstream classrooms. Whereas the inclusion of children with learning difficulties in typical classrooms has gained increasing advocacy, little is known about Deaf children’s views and experiences in a school for the Deaf. In this mixed methods study, interviews were conducted to investigate Deaf elementary school children’s experiences of inclusion and exclusion both at school and at home. Interviews were transcribed and through thematic analysis, four themes were developed to express these students’ experiences. The children indicated they felt included by ...


Child Witnesses, Thomas D. Lyon, Kelly McWilliams, Shanna Williams 2019 University of Southern California

Child Witnesses, Thomas D. Lyon, Kelly Mcwilliams, Shanna Williams

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

In this chapter we provide an overview of psychological issues involving children’s capacities as witnesses. First, we discuss the kinds of cases in which children are usually involved. Across different courts, one most often sees children describing abuse at the hands of familiar adults. Second, we describe the difficulties children encounter in disclosing abuse, particularly when it is perpetrated by adults close to them. These dynamics lead most children to remain silent, and only the most forthcoming children to disclose. Third, we suggest a framework for assessing children’s allegations, in which child-generated and adult-generated information lie on opposite ...


Why Girls? The Importance Of Developing Gender-Specific Health Promotion Programs For Adolescent Girls, Amanda Birnbaum, Tracy R. Nichols 2019 University of North Carolina

Why Girls? The Importance Of Developing Gender-Specific Health Promotion Programs For Adolescent Girls, Amanda Birnbaum, Tracy R. Nichols

Amanda Birnbaum

Adolescence is a time when many girls begin to develop unhealthy behaviors that can affect myriad short- and long-term health outcomes across their lifespan.2There is evidence that smoking, physical activity, and diet are habituated during adolescence, and some physiologic processes of adolescence, such as peak bone mass development, have direct effects on future health.3-4 Establishing healthy practices, beliefs and knowledge among adolescent girls will decrease morbidity and mortality among adult women and potentially affect the health of men and children through women’s role as healthcare agents. This paper provides a brief review of lifestyle health behaviors among ...


Self-Management Strategies Mediate Self-Efficacy And Physical Activity, Amanda Birnbaum, Rod K. Dishman, Robert W. Motl, James F. Sallis, Andrea L. Dunn, Greg J. Welk, Ariane L. Yung, Carolyn C. Voorhees, Jared B. Jobe 2019 University of Georgia

Self-Management Strategies Mediate Self-Efficacy And Physical Activity, Amanda Birnbaum, Rod K. Dishman, Robert W. Motl, James F. Sallis, Andrea L. Dunn, Greg J. Welk, Ariane L. Yung, Carolyn C. Voorhees, Jared B. Jobe

Amanda Birnbaum

Self-efficacy theory proposes that girls who have confidence in their capability to be physically active will perceive fewer barriers to physical activity or be less influenced by them, be more likely to pursue perceived benefits of being physically active, and be more likely to enjoy physical activity. Self-efficacy is theorized also to influence physical activity through self-management strategies (e.g., thoughts, goals, plans, and acts) that support physical activity, but this idea has not been empirically tested.


Why School Based Mental Health Matters, Jenny Wilhoite 2019 Georgia Hope

Why School Based Mental Health Matters, Jenny Wilhoite

National Youth-At-Risk Conference Savannah

This session is designed to give an overview of how to create a School-Based Mental Health program that benefits students on all tiers, providing universal prevention, early intervention, and intensive services for at-risk students. Meeting the unmet needs of students with mental health challenges impacts student attendance, behavioral and academic outcomes, and discipline in a positive way.


Unveiling The Mask:Sexual Trauma's Impact On Academic Achievement, Behavior, And Self-Identity, TeShaunda Hannor-Walker 2019 Liberty University

Unveiling The Mask:Sexual Trauma's Impact On Academic Achievement, Behavior, And Self-Identity, Teshaunda Hannor-Walker

National Youth-At-Risk Conference Savannah

Sexual trauma is an unfortunate but a common and often masked experience for many students in America. While sexual trauma in itself is not a mental health disorder, it can become a risk factor for many academic and mental health problems. Trauma-informed schools can play an important role in helping students deal with the aftercare of a traumatic experience.


Student Wellbeing Matters! Use Positive Psychology Interventions To Help Your Students Achieve And Succeed., Andrea A. Francis 2019 Georgia Southern University

Student Wellbeing Matters! Use Positive Psychology Interventions To Help Your Students Achieve And Succeed., Andrea A. Francis

National Youth-At-Risk Conference Savannah

Positive Psychology Interventions (PPI), grounded in the psychological theory of Wellbeing (Seligman, 2002) are pathways to a life of purpose and meaning. Each intervention is proved to not only reduce anxiety and increase optimism, but to create protective factors needed to cope with stress, anxiety and trauma.


Adhd And The Deficit Of Knowing: What?, Katie N. Schenk 2019 Kansas State University

Adhd And The Deficit Of Knowing: What?, Katie N. Schenk

Crossing Borders: A Multidisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Scholarship

This research-based essay explores the author’s experience with ADHD, as the essay’s formatting and usage of space evolves into a visual representation of the ADHD mind and questions the human capacity to identify, label, and differentiate inaccessible experiences. The common, often misinformed understanding of ADHD is disputed through in depth analyses of various brain functions. In particular, the atypical development of the executive functions housed in the ADHD person’s frontal lobe are explored through both contemporary research and personal experience, which are variously compared and contrasted to the supposed neurotypical experience. Consideration of ADHD’s lifelong stigma ...


Military Deployment In A Family: Children’S Literature As A Basis For Counseling Support, Aimee Tubbs, Ellie L. Young, Melissa A. Heath, Tina T. Dyches 2019 Brigham Young University - Provo

Military Deployment In A Family: Children’S Literature As A Basis For Counseling Support, Aimee Tubbs, Ellie L. Young, Melissa A. Heath, Tina T. Dyches

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

The authors summarize 30 children’s books that tell stories of a family member’s military deployment in order to identify books that could be used in bibliotherapy for children impacted by deployment. In this sample of books, the main characters are most commonly portrayed as feeling sad about a family member’s deployment. The most prevalent coping strategies are finding ways to stay connected to the deployed person and talking with an adult. An unexpected finding was a coping strategy of expressing pride in the family member’s military service.


The Utility Of Direct Questions In Eliciting Subjective Content From Children Disclosing Sexual Abuse, Stacia N. Stolzenberg, Shanna Williams, Kelly McWilliams, Catherine Liang, Thomas D. Lyon 2019 Arizona State University

The Utility Of Direct Questions In Eliciting Subjective Content From Children Disclosing Sexual Abuse, Stacia N. Stolzenberg, Shanna Williams, Kelly Mcwilliams, Catherine Liang, Thomas D. Lyon

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Background: Children alleging sexual abuse rarely exhibit emotion when disclosing, but they may be able to describe their subjective reactions to abuse if asked.

Objective: This study examined the extent to which different types of questions in child sexual abuse interviews elicited subjective content, namely emotional reactions, cognitive content, and physical sensations.

Participants and Setting: The study included transcripts of 205 Child Advocacy Center interviews with 4- to 12-year-old children alleging sexual abuse.

Methods: We coded questions for question type, distinguishing among invitations, wh- questions, yes/no and forced-choice questions, and suggestive questions. We coded both questions and answers for ...


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