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Secession And Federalism In The United States: Tools For Managing Regional Conflict In A Pluralist Society, Erin Ryan 2016 Florida State University

Secession And Federalism In The United States: Tools For Managing Regional Conflict In A Pluralist Society, Erin Ryan

Erin Ryan

This volume, incorporating the work of scholars from various parts of the globe, taps the wisdom of the Westphalian (and post-Westphalian) world on the use of federalism and secession as tools for managing regional conflict.  The conversation has scarcely been more important than it is right now, especially in light of recent events in Catalonia, Scotland, Québec, and the Sudan—all unique political contexts raising similar questions about how best to balance competing claims for autonomy, interdependence, political voice, and exit.  Exploring how various nations have encountered like conflicts, some more and some less successfully, promises to broaden the perspectives ...


Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant McCall 2016 Tulane University of Louisiana

Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant Mccall

Karl Widerquist


Why do political philosophers write so much about prehistory but do such little research on it? The state of nature, the origin of property, the genesis of government, and the primordial nature of war and inequality are perennial favourite topics in political philosophy, but their use is often ambiguous. Are these merely illustrative examples? If so, what do they illustrate? If not, what claims to they make about prehistory. Does the best available evidence from the fields of archaeology and anthropology support or conflict with those claims?
 
This book presents an anthropological critique of philosophy, examining political theories to show ...


Appendix To Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant McCall 2016 Tulane University of Louisiana

Appendix To Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant Mccall

Karl Widerquist


This is an early version of the appendix to the book: Prehistoric Myths in Modern Political Philosophy.
 
Book abstract: Why do political philosophers write so much about prehistory but do such little research on it? The state of nature, the origin of property, the genesis of government, and the primordial nature of war and inequality are perennial favourite topics in political philosophy, but their use is often ambiguous. Are these merely illustrative examples? If so, what do they illustrate? If not, what claims to they make about prehistory. Does the best available evidence from the fields of archaeology and anthropology ...


"Trans-American Indigeneities", Tracy Devine Guzmán 2016 University of Miami

"Trans-American Indigeneities", Tracy Devine Guzmán

Tracy Devine Guzmán

Forthcoming.


Surfing The Revolutionary Wave 2010-12: A Social Theory Of Agency, Resistance, And Orders Of Dissent In Contemporary Social Movements, Athina Karatzogianni, Michael Schandorf 2016 University of Hull

Surfing The Revolutionary Wave 2010-12: A Social Theory Of Agency, Resistance, And Orders Of Dissent In Contemporary Social Movements, Athina Karatzogianni, Michael Schandorf

Athina Karatzogianni

The theorisation and understanding of contemporary social movements, socio-technological phenomena, and the intersection of the two are limited by an incommensurability between the conceptualisations of individual agency and the disciplining powers of social structures. We introduce a theory of sociotechnological agency that bridges the individual and the social through a reconceptualization of the conventional notion of intentionality. Drawing from recent theories of affect and embodiment, posthuman-influenced materialisms and realisms, postmodern critical theory, and critiques of network theory, we introduce a model for understanding sociopolitical action and dissent that accounts for individual human agency as a nexus of overlapping and often ...


Access To Communication In United States Prisons: Reducing Recidivism Through Expanded Communication Programs With Inmates, Lilie Gross 2016 University of Puget Sound

Access To Communication In United States Prisons: Reducing Recidivism Through Expanded Communication Programs With Inmates, Lilie Gross

Politics & Government Undergraduate Theses

The need for better communication systems in prisons is dire and will reduce recidivism rates in the United States. Not only is communication via phone lines extremely expensive and corrupt, it is almost impossible. Inmates in United States Prisons need this availability and option to communicate with their families and maintain outside relationships. While maintaining healthy and positive relationships is good for inmate's mental health, it also decreases the risk of recidivism. This paper aims to highlight the benefits of phone communication and relationships between inmates and family on the outside for it will decrease the 50% recidivism rate ...


The Rise Of The Global South, The Imf And The Future Of Law And Development, Gabriel Garcia 2016 University of Wollongong

The Rise Of The Global South, The Imf And The Future Of Law And Development, Gabriel Garcia

Dr Gabriel Garcia

After the onset of the Asian Financial Crisis, the world has witnessed a re-accommodation of the global financial system. In the particular case of middle-income countries, they have disentangled themselves from the conditionality of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and grown into more assertive actors in international forums, proposing new alternative mechanisms to become more financially independent and for the provision of development assistance. The article critically reviews the new reality by assessing the strategies deployed by developing countries to reduce the IMF’s influence and explores the potential consequences of the rise of middle-income nations for Law and Development.


Power And Proximity: The Politics Of State Secession, Elizabeth A. Nelson 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Power And Proximity: The Politics Of State Secession, Elizabeth A. Nelson

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

State secession is a rare occurrence in the international system. While a number of movements seek secession, the majority fail to achieve statehood. Of the exceptional successes, many have not had the strongest claims to statehood; some of these new states look far less like states than some that have failed. So what accounts for these secessions? I argue that the politics of regional actors drive the process. If a secessionist movement does not have the support of actors in the region, it will not achieve statehood. There are three mechanisms through which regional actors can determine outcomes: (1) they ...


Normalization Policies With Cuba: Implications For Political And Economic Reform, Ramona N. Khan 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Normalization Policies With Cuba: Implications For Political And Economic Reform, Ramona N. Khan

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

For longer than the past half century, the relationship between the United States and Cuba has been one of antagonism, mistrust, betrayal, hostility and defiance. Decades of mutual hostility arising from Cuba’s post revolution adoption of an economic system that emulated that of the Soviet Union, along with the long history of U.S. interference in Cuba’s domestic and international affairs that predated the Castro revolution and continued afterward, have resulted in this rancorous relationship. Cuba’s move to communism shortly after the Castro regime came to power was regarded as a threat to both democracy and capitalism ...


How Civility Works, Keith Bybee 2016 Syracuse University

How Civility Works, Keith Bybee

Institute for the Study of the Judiciary, Politics, and the Media at Syracuse University

Is civility dead? Americans ask this question every election season, but their concern is hardly limited to political campaigns. Doubts about civility regularly arise in just about every aspect of American public life. Rudeness runs rampant. Our news media is saturated with aggressive bluster and vitriol. Our digital platforms teem with expressions of disrespect and trolls. Reflecting these conditions, surveys show that a significant majority of Americans believe we are living in an age of unusual anger and discord. Everywhere we look, there seems to be conflict and hostility, with shared respect and consideration nowhere to be found. In a ...


Group Empathy Theory: The Effect Of Group Empathy On U.S. Intergroup Attitudes And Behavior In The Context Of Immigration Threats, Cigdem Sirin, Nicholas Valentino, José Villalobos 2016 University of Texas at El Paso

Group Empathy Theory: The Effect Of Group Empathy On U.S. Intergroup Attitudes And Behavior In The Context Of Immigration Threats, Cigdem Sirin, Nicholas Valentino, José Villalobos

José D. Villalobos

Group Empathy Theory posits empathy felt by members of one group can boost support for another even when the groups are in direct competition for rights, security, and resources. We employ our theory to explain divergent reactions of majority versus minority groups to immigration threats. We conduct a two-wave national survey experiment with 1,799 participants consisting of a randomized sample of Anglos and randomized, stratified oversamples of African Americans and Latinos. The experiment manipulates racial/ethnic cues in a vignette depicting an ambiguous yet potentially threatening incident at an immigrant detention center. African Americans and Latinos are significantly more ...


How Civility Works.Pdf, Keith J. Bybee 2016 Syracuse University

How Civility Works.Pdf, Keith J. Bybee

Keith J. Bybee

Is civility dead? Americans ask this question every election season, but their concern is hardly limited to political campaigns. Doubts about civility regularly arise in just about every aspect of American public life. Rudeness runs rampant. Our news media is saturated with aggressive bluster and vitriol. Our digital platforms teem with expressions of disrespect and trolls. Reflecting these conditions, surveys show that a significant majority of Americans believe we are living in an age of unusual anger and discord. Everywhere we look, there seems to be conflict and hostility, with shared respect and consideration nowhere to be found. In a ...


Living Without Recognition : A Case Study Of Burmese Refugees In Malaysia., Meagan Floyd, Michael Zeller, Jason P. Abbott 2016 University of Louisville

Living Without Recognition : A Case Study Of Burmese Refugees In Malaysia., Meagan Floyd, Michael Zeller, Jason P. Abbott

Jason Abbott

No abstract provided.


Review Essay Of Farish Noor's "The Malaysian Islamic Party Pas 1951-2013 : Islamism In A Mottled Nation.", Jason P. Abbott 2016 University of Louisville

Review Essay Of Farish Noor's "The Malaysian Islamic Party Pas 1951-2013 : Islamism In A Mottled Nation.", Jason P. Abbott

Jason Abbott

No abstract provided.


Doing Justice To Justice? Entanglements With Hegemony And Transitional Justice, Surer Q. Mohamed 2016 The University of Western Ontario

Doing Justice To Justice? Entanglements With Hegemony And Transitional Justice, Surer Q. Mohamed

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Transitional justice is affected by the moment it emerged in the international system, the post-Cold War era. Its form was distorted by the international context into which it was born: the dissolution of the bipolar Cold War political order, the triumph of the United States as the world’s sole hegemon, and the cascading wave of liberalization that crashed across the globe. Transitional justice was shaped by this political moment, as it absorbed important tenets of liberal internationalism. Transitional justice also helped shape this political moment, as it became a solution to the problem that illiberal non-democratic, conflicted states pose ...


Vultures Or Vanguards?: The Role Of Litigation In Sovereign Debt Restructuring, Jill E. Fisch, Caroline M. Gentile 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Vultures Or Vanguards?: The Role Of Litigation In Sovereign Debt Restructuring, Jill E. Fisch, Caroline M. Gentile

Jill Fisch

No abstract provided.


How Do Corporations Play Politics? The Fedex Story, Jill E. Fisch 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

How Do Corporations Play Politics? The Fedex Story, Jill E. Fisch

Jill Fisch

No abstract provided.


Response To Daniel Skidmore-Hess On The “Bankruptcy Of Liberalism And Social Democracy In The Neoliberal Age”, Ronald W. Cox 2016 Florida International University

Response To Daniel Skidmore-Hess On The “Bankruptcy Of Liberalism And Social Democracy In The Neoliberal Age”, Ronald W. Cox

Class, Race and Corporate Power

Ronald W. Cox writes a response to Daniel Skidmore-Hess' reply to Cox's "The Bankruptcy of Social Democracy and Liberalism in the Neoliberal Age," which was originally published in CRCP Volume 3, Issue 1.


The “Bankruptcy” Of Liberalism And Social Democracy In The Neoliberal Age: A Response To Ronald W. Cox, Daniel Skidmore-Hess 2016 Armstrong State University

The “Bankruptcy” Of Liberalism And Social Democracy In The Neoliberal Age: A Response To Ronald W. Cox, Daniel Skidmore-Hess

Class, Race and Corporate Power

Daniel Skidmore-Hess writes a response to an earlier Perspectives article written by Ronald W. Cox titled "The Bankruptcy of Social Democracy and Liberalism in the Neoliberal Age," Volume 3, Issue 1. Cox then responds to Skidmore-Hess in a follow-up Perspectives article.


Litigation Reform: An Institutional Approach, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang 2016 Univ of Penn Law School

Litigation Reform: An Institutional Approach, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang

Sean Farhang

The program of regulation through private litigation that Democratic Congresses purposefully created starting in the late 1960s soon met opposition emanating primarily from the Republican party. In the long campaign for retrenchment that began in the Reagan administration, consequential reform proved difficult and ultimately failed in Congress. Litigation reformers turned to the courts and, in marked contrast to their legislative failure, were well-rewarded, achieving growing rates of voting support from an increasingly conservative Supreme Court on issues curtailing private enforcement under individual statutes. We also demonstrate that the judiciary’s control of procedure has been central to the campaign to ...


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