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Travelogue, Delhi-Beijing, Pallavi Aiyar 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Travelogue, Delhi-Beijing, Pallavi Aiyar

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

The plane burps to a halt and almost immediately everyone is on their feet, jostling to open the over-head lockers, reaching high for their strolleys. My head feels stuffed with lead and I marvel at the nimble alacrity of my fellow travellers, at 3:00 in the morning. Slowly we shuffle off the Air China flight and make it into the inadequately-air conditioned environs of Indira Gandhi International Airport.


Five C’S On China, Censorship, And Cyberspace, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Five C’S On China, Censorship, And Cyberspace

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We’re continuing to track the Google and China story, and wanted to call your attention to these particularly good pieces of writing — each of which brought a “c” adjective to mind:


Blogging Aas 2010 (2), William Callahan 2010 University of Manchester

Blogging Aas 2010 (2), William Callahan

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

One of the pleasures of going to a conference is seeing what free goodies you can scam from various institutions. Lots of free pens were proffered by various publishers. A Chinese press was giving out some trinkets — but for some reason not to me. The International Institute for Asian Studies (Leiden) was once again giving out sheer canvas bags loaded with their newsletter and other readable items. UBC Press offered 50-year-old issues of Pacific Affairs for the antiquarians among us, as well as more recent issues.


Blogging Aas 2010, Shellen Xiao Wu, Daniel Little, William A. Callahan 2010 Princeton University

Blogging Aas 2010, Shellen Xiao Wu, Daniel Little, William A. Callahan

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

As many of our readers are already aware, the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting is taking place this weekend in Philadelphia. The largest annual gathering of Asia scholars in the world (this year there will be about three thousand in attendance), the AAS meeting brings together university-based and independent scholars and writers who work in fields ranging from history to political science to literature and studying cultures and countries across Asia.


Google.Cn & Beyond: Politics Of Digital Media, Silvia Lindtner 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Google.Cn & Beyond: Politics Of Digital Media, Silvia Lindtner

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

A bit more than two months ago, on January 12, 2010, Google released an official statement on its corporate blog that described the company’s plan to push back over censorship of search results on Google.cn. The following is an excerpt from that statement, which was inspired in large part by sophisticated cyber attacks against Gmail users that originated from within China:


Capturing Chinese With Help From Lu Xun, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Capturing Chinese With Help From Lu Xun

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We’ve run several posts on Lu Xun at China Beat recently (including this one by Julia Lovell and this one by Sean Macdonald). While Lovell’s new translation of Lu Xun’s stories caters to an Anglophone audience, Kevin Nadolny wanted to create a reader that made Lu Xun more accessible to Chinese-language learners. His new text, Capturing Chinese: Short Stories from Lu Xun’s Nahan, features a fully glossed text of Lu Xun’s short stories so that language learners can focus on reading and comprehension rather than their dictionaries. Here, Kevin answers questions about his motivations for ...


When Skinny Is Too Thin, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

When Skinny Is Too Thin

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Many Taiwanese are becoming increasingly concerned for the health of First Lady Chow Mei-ching 周美青 (Christine Chow Ma), who suffered a spinal injury after being bowled over by a group of overenthusiastic children while visiting a primary school in Pingtung 屏東 County on March 3. She was released from the hospital on March 16, but despite repeated Presidential Office reassurances that the First Lady is in good health doctors have ordered two months of additional bed rest, meaning that she had to miss the opening game of Taiwan’s professional baseball league on March 20 (the First Lady is an ...


Tangka, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Tangka

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“Baimaobar, a Tibetan friend from Qinghai province, poses next to the thangka-esque art he painted on the wall of my Beijing flat in 2008.


The End Of The Revolution: China And The Limits Of Modernity, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The End Of The Revolution: China And The Limits Of Modernity

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

When the Association for Asian Studies meets in Philadelphia later this week, one of the keynote speakers will be Tsinghua University professor and noted public intellectual Wang Hui, whose talk on Saturday evening is free and open to the public. A former editor of Dushu(“Reading”), Wang’s writings include China’s New Order: Society, Politics, and Economy in Transition(Harvard, 2003), as well as a recently released collection of essays, The End of the Revolution: China and the Limits of Modernity (Verso, 2009). Here, we are pleased to share with China Beat readers an excerpt from the English edition ...


A New Book (Almost In The Bookstores) And Some Boston To Boulder Speaking Dates, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

A New Book (Almost In The Bookstores) And Some Boston To Boulder Speaking Dates

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Back when the “China Beat” was in its infancy (figuring that blog years should be reckoned like dog years, it is now solidly in its adolescence), those of us involved in launching it thought that a fair amount of its content might well end up taking the form of “Self-Promotion Saturday” posts (shamelessly touting activities we’d been involved in) or “Coming Distractions” reviews (discussions of books that were about to appear, films that were in the works, upcoming conferences, etc.). Thankfully, the content has turned out to be much more varied, so these two features have only made up ...


The China Beat: Lost In Translation Edition, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The China Beat: Lost In Translation Edition

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

1. A trackback on Peter Hessler’s recent China Beat photo essay, “Behind the Wheel, About to Snap” led us to this Spanish-language review of his latest book,Country Driving. If you don’t read Spanish, there’s a button on the page that takes you to a Google translation of the review; while the translation hits a few potholes along the way, it’s a generally good rendition of a perceptive and well-written overview of Hessler’s book.


Google And China: The Analysis Continues, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Google And China: The Analysis Continues

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Almost three weeks have passed since Google’s January 12 announcement that it would be reconsidering its Chinese operations, and although the company has not yet indicated a final decision about its future in China, the issues raised by this matter have sparked a number of thoughtful analyses. Yesterday, China Beatfeatured a piece by Geremie Barmé on “The Harmonious Evolution of Information in China”; below, some more recent commentaries on the Google and China story that have gotten our attention:


The Harmonious Evolution Of Information In China, Geremie R. Barme 2010 The ANU College of Asia and the Pacific

The Harmonious Evolution Of Information In China, Geremie R. Barme

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

As the contretemps involving Google’s conflicted presence in the People’s Republic of China unfolds, it is timely to recall one anniversary that passed by all but unnoticed in 2009: that of a covert Cold War-era clash between John Foster Dulles and Mao Zedong in 1959. This overlooked anniversary is worth recalling now, since it is of particular relevance to contextualizing the remarks—and the Chinese response to those remarks—that US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made regarding Internet freedom and US policy at the Newseum in Washington on 21 January 2010 (see here for full text of ...


Over Exposure, Lisa Movius 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Over Exposure, Lisa Movius

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“The Expo story that couldn’t be printed.” That’s what editors at Shanghai’s City Weekend magazine found they had on their hands several weeks ago, when Chinese censors deemed the story below “too negative” to run. A revised version was subsequently submitted, approved by the censors, and printed in the January 20, 2010 issue. City Weekend decided not to post the original story on its website as planned, as they were told it was inadvisable due to an official caution against publishing media reports critical of the Expo. Here, we are pleased to share with China Beat readers ...


Lessons From Sichuan For Haitian Survivors, Sascha Matuszak 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Lessons From Sichuan For Haitian Survivors, Sascha Matuszak

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

China has just sent its second medical team to Haiti, along with 20 tons of supplies and five Chinese peacekeepers to replace the four who died in the earthquake that destroyed Port-au-Prince on January 12th. The current group replaces a set of Chinese International Search and Rescue workers and sniffer dogs who arrived in Haiti the day after the disaster struck.


Over Exposure, Lisa Movius, Shakhar Rahav 2010 University of Haifa

Over Exposure, Lisa Movius, Shakhar Rahav

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“The Expo story that couldn’t be printed.” That’s what editors at Shanghai’s City Weekend magazine found they had on their hands several weeks ago, when Chinese censors deemed the story below “too negative” to run. A revised version was subsequently submitted, approved by the censors, and printed in the January 20, 2010 issue. City Weekend decided not to post the original story on its website as planned, as they were told it was inadvisable due to an official caution against publishing media reports critical of the Expo. Here, we are pleased to share with China Beat readers ...


The Tao Of Avatar — And Why This Sort Of Movie Cannot Be Made In The Prc At This Point In Time…, Sam Crane 2010 Williams College

The Tao Of Avatar — And Why This Sort Of Movie Cannot Be Made In The Prc At This Point In Time…, Sam Crane

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We saw Avatar last night (I know, I’ve been on a movie kick of late…). It was visually stunning. The story was unremarkable: a melodramatic morality tale (the good guy wins in the end!). But it did have a couple of Taoist elements, which were no doubt quite consciously incorporated into the story.


The Political Economy Of Avatar’S Chinese Adventure, Stanley Rosen 2010 University of Southern California

The Political Economy Of Avatar’S Chinese Adventure, Stanley Rosen

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

There’s been a lot of discussion of the political meanings that can be read intoAvatar and how this might relate to it being pulled from or simply ending its run in some Chinese theaters. As a political scientist with a long-term interest in the Chinese film industry, and the fate of Hollywood movies in China, and someone who is interested in the working of SARFT (the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television), here are four things worth keeping in mind when considering the situation:


Christ In Pingyao, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Christ In Pingyao

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

In the old town of Pingyao, right next to the Confucius temple, Christmas banners still hang on a Catholic Church, built 1910. Mr Zhang, housesitting the Church while its priest is away, stands messianically in his room, shortly after his quiet attempts to convert me.


Five Questions (And Answers) About “Autumn Gem”, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham 2010 National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

Five Questions (And Answers) About “Autumn Gem”, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

At the beginning of March, Rae Chang and Adam Tow came to UC Irvine to show their docudrama about the life of Qiu Jin, Autumn Gem (see here for their blog post about the UCI event, and here for a list of upcoming screenings around the country). The movie traces the life of “China’s first feminist,” Qiu Jin (1875-1907), who was a leader in both the nationalist and women’s movements and was executed at the age of 32 for her involvement in a plot to overthrow the Qing government. Hailed as a revolutionary martyr in China, Qiu Jin ...


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