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Automated Data Processing: Making Community Indicators Possible For Lafayette, Indiana, Jace T. Newell, Eli W. Coltin, Eric D. Flaningam 2021 Purdue University

Automated Data Processing: Making Community Indicators Possible For Lafayette, Indiana, Jace T. Newell, Eli W. Coltin, Eric D. Flaningam

The Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research

No abstract provided.


Do Minimum Charity Care Provision Requirements Increase Provision Of Charity Care In Nonprofit Hospitals?, Michah W. Rothbart, Nara Yoon 2021 Syracuse University

Do Minimum Charity Care Provision Requirements Increase Provision Of Charity Care In Nonprofit Hospitals?, Michah W. Rothbart, Nara Yoon

Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion: Population Health Research Brief Series

Nonprofit hospitals receive significant federal, state, and local tax exemptions, partly based on the rationale that nonprofit hospitals provide public goods and services. Through Minimum Charity Care Provision (MCCP) requirements, nonprofit hospitals are required to spend a certain percentage of their revenues on charity care. However, it is not clear whether these requirements increase spending on charity care. This brief summarizes findings from research examining the differences in provisions of charity care across different hospital market sectors – non-profit, for-profit, and government. Findings suggest that MCCP requirements for nonprofit hospitals do not lead to more charity care. If anything, targeting policies ...


The U.S. Child Care Subsidy Program Is Underused But Well-Positioned To Promote Racial Equity, Taryn Morrissey, Colleen Heflin, William Fannin 2021 American University

The U.S. Child Care Subsidy Program Is Underused But Well-Positioned To Promote Racial Equity, Taryn Morrissey, Colleen Heflin, William Fannin

Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion: Population Health Research Brief Series

Child care is expensive and difficult to find, especially for infants and toddlers. Compared to their higher-income peers, children from lower-income families are less likely to attend out-of-home early childhood care – which tend to be more expensive but provides more stability and is higher quality than home-based care. This contributes to disparities in school readiness and later life outcomes. This brief summarizes findings from a recently published paper examining administrative data from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Findings suggest that children are least likely to receive subsides when they are infants and toddlers despite early childhood care being the most important ...


Reassessing The Case For Development Charges In Canadian Municipalities, Andrew Sancton 2021 Western University

Reassessing The Case For Development Charges In Canadian Municipalities, Andrew Sancton

Centre for Urban Policy and Local Governance – Publications

“Growth should pay for growth.” This slogan—the common justification for development charges—is rarely challenged in municipal circles. The principle that those who cause new urban growth should pay for the infrastructure associated with it has generally been taken for granted, at least for the last few decades. Development charges evolved from post-1945 subdivision agreements and were initially accepted by most developers as a mechanism for enhancing the likelihood that current residents in a municipality would agree to new development. They now add as much as $90,000 to the cost of a new house in some parts of ...


Addressing Food Insecurity In The United States During And After The Covid-19 Pandemic: The Role Of The Federal Nutrition Safety Net, Sheila Fleischhacker, Sara N. Bleich 2021 Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

Addressing Food Insecurity In The United States During And After The Covid-19 Pandemic: The Role Of The Federal Nutrition Safety Net, Sheila Fleischhacker, Sara N. Bleich

Journal of Food Law & Policy

Food insecurity has been a direct and almost immediate consequence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its associated ramifications on unemployment, poverty and food supply disruptions. As a social determinant of health, food insecurity is associated with poor health outcomes including diet related chronic diseases, which are associated with worst COVID-19 outcomes (e.g., COVID-19 patients of all ages with obesity face higher risk of complications, death). In the United States (US), the federal nutrition safety net is predominantly made up of the suite of 15 federal nutrition assistance programs that the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) administers ...


Understanding Modern History Of International Food Law Is Key To Building A More Resilient And Improved Global Food System, Michael T. Roberts 2021 University of California, Los Angeles

Understanding Modern History Of International Food Law Is Key To Building A More Resilient And Improved Global Food System, Michael T. Roberts

Journal of Food Law & Policy

This article advocates the need for a history of the development of modern international food law and suggests an analytical approach to complement the chronicling of events. Comprehension of this history will help elucidate the evolution of a complicated modern global food system, including its resiliency and vulnerability as demonstrated by Covid-19, thereby providing valuable context for change in the system where needed. This essay makes the case for such a history in three parts. First, it briefly demonstrates the need for a historical perspective through a critical examination of a journal article that speaks to Covid-19 food security in ...


Biden Administration U.S. Space Force Policy Literature, Bert Chapman 2021 Purdue University

Biden Administration U.S. Space Force Policy Literature, Bert Chapman

Libraries Faculty and Staff Presentations

Provides details on U.S. Space Force policy literature produced by the Biden Administration during its first eight months. Includes announcements that the Biden Administration will continue this new armed services branch begun during the Trump Administration. Features congressional testimony of Biden Administration officials such as Secretary of Defense Lloyd Wilson and Air Force Space Command leader General James Dickinson, the text of Space Force's 2021 Digital Force Vision document, congressionally approved FY 2022 space force budget figures, congressional committee comments and report requirements contained in emerging defense spending legislation, the emergence of collaboration between Space Force and universities ...


Monetary And Fiscal Policies During The Covid-19 Crisis: The Case Of Singapore, Hwee Kwan CHOW, Kong Weng HO 2021 Singapore Management University

Monetary And Fiscal Policies During The Covid-19 Crisis: The Case Of Singapore, Hwee Kwan Chow, Kong Weng Ho

Research Collection School of Economics

The infrastructure and capabilities for outbreak management, strengthened after the 2003 SARS outbreak, have contributed to the competent handling of the Covid-19 pandemic in Singapore except the blind spot at the migrant workers’ dormitories, which was swiftly corrected, preventing a spread to the community at large. Overall, the concerted whole of government approach along with clear communication and the cohesive response of the public to intervention measures were key factors in the effective management of the crisis, in addition to timely monetary and fiscal responses.

Responding to a fall in real GDP of 6.5%, and a reduction of 171 ...


The Effects Of Recent Minimum Wage Increases On Self-Reported Health In The United States, Liam Sigaud 2021 University of Maine

The Effects Of Recent Minimum Wage Increases On Self-Reported Health In The United States, Liam Sigaud

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

A sharp income-health gradient exists in the United States. Lower levels of income are associated with higher rates of mortality, morbidity, and risky health behaviors, as well as decreased access to health care. Growing evidence of a causal link between income and health suggests that government income-support policies may be an effective strategy for improving health outcomes among poor Americans. One such policy – the minimum wage – has experienced a surge in popularity in recent years. In 2019, twenty-five states and the District of Columbia increased their minimum wage, up from only eight states in 2011. Yet the literature on the ...


Measuring Palatability As A Linear Combination Of Nutrient Levels In Food Items, Jeffrey S. Young 2021 Murray State University

Measuring Palatability As A Linear Combination Of Nutrient Levels In Food Items, Jeffrey S. Young

Faculty & Staff Research and Creative Activity

It well known that palatability and nutritional quality of foods and/or diets are viewed as being in tension with one another. While there exist multiple measures of healthiness, there are no such measures for tastiness. This gap limits the degree to which researchers can investigate this tension and its implications for dietary behavior and hence public health and nutrition policy. The scope of future work concerning the dietary behavior of Americans would expand greatly if researchers better understood consumers’ willingness to eat certain foods, which matters as much as recommending those foods for them to eat in the first ...


Essays In Urban Economics, Benjamin Stutts 2021 Southern Methodist University

Essays In Urban Economics, Benjamin Stutts

Economics Theses and Dissertations

Chapter 1 examines how land use regulation affects residential segregation by income. Residential segregation by income severely limits access to opportunity for low-income households, restricting prospects of upward mobility. Land use regulations are one potential determinant of such segregation. However, establishing a causal link between such regulation and segregation faces two econometric challenges. First, regulation is potentially endogenous. Second, proper measurement of segregation is difficult. Concerning the first challenge, the prior literature relies on instrumental variables that may not be valid. Concerning the second challenge, the prior literature relies on measures that ignore the spatial dimension of segregation. This paper ...


Municipal Fiber In The United States: A Financial Assessment, Christopher S. Yoo, Jesse Lambert, Timothy P. Pfenninger 2021 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Municipal Fiber In The United States: A Financial Assessment, Christopher S. Yoo, Jesse Lambert, Timothy P. Pfenninger

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Despite growing interest in broadband provided by municipally owned and operated fiber-to-the-home networks, the academic literature has yet to undertake a systematic assessment of these projects’ financial performance. To fill this gap, we utilize municipalities’ official reports to offer an empirical evaluation of the financial performance of every municipal fiber project in the U.S. operating in 2010 through 2019. An analysis of the actual performance of the resulting fifteen-project panel dataset reveals that none of the projects generated sufficient nominal cash flow in the short run to maintain solvency without infusions of additional cash from outside sources or debt ...


Determinants Of The Changing Funding Burden Of Higher Education, Matthew van den Berg 2021 University of Nebraska at Kearney

Determinants Of The Changing Funding Burden Of Higher Education, Matthew Van Den Berg

Mountain Plains Journal of Business and Technology

This paper analyses the political economy of public higher education funding in the United States and offers a unique conceptual and empirical approach to describe the determinants of funding sources. By evaluating the tuition proportion of revenue, this analysis estimates the determinants of the relative distribution of the funding burden between public and private sources. The empirical results show inelastic substitution between government appropriations and tuition revenue, significant demand effects on tuition revenue, and that institutional differences contribute to varying dependence on tuition as a source of revenue. The estimated determinants identify several areas where state and university policies may ...


Reference-Dependent Preferences, Time Inconsistency, And Pay-As-You-Go Pensions, Torben M. Andersen, Joydeep Bhattacharya, Qing Liu 2021 Aarhus University

Reference-Dependent Preferences, Time Inconsistency, And Pay-As-You-Go Pensions, Torben M. Andersen, Joydeep Bhattacharya, Qing Liu

Economics Publications

The classic Aaron–Samuelson result argues that pay-as-you-go (PAYG) pension schemes cannot coexist with higher-return, private, retirement-saving schemes. The ensuing literature shows if agents voluntarily undersave for retirement due to myopia or time-inconsistency, then a paternalistic, rationale for PAYG pensions arises only if voluntary retirement saving is fully crowded out because of a binding borrowing constraint. This paper generalizes the discussion to the reference-dependent utility setup of Kőszegi and Rabin (2009) where undersaving happens naturally. No borrowing constraint is imposed. We show it is possible to offer a non-paternalistic, welfare rationale for return-dominated, PAYG pensions to coexist with private, retirement ...


Lessons Learned: Neel Kashkari, Yasemin Esmen 2021 Yale University

Lessons Learned: Neel Kashkari, Yasemin Esmen

The Journal of Financial Crises

Neel Kashkari was the Interim Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Stability between October 2008 and May 2009. He oversaw the architecture and administration of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) during this time. This “Lessons Learned” is based on a phone interview with Mr. Kashkari.


Lessons Learned: Phillip Swagel, Yasemin Esmen 2021 Yale University

Lessons Learned: Phillip Swagel, Yasemin Esmen

The Journal of Financial Crises

Phillip Swagel was Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy at the U.S. Treasury between 2006 and 2009. During this time, he advised Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson as his chief economist, served as a member of the TARP Investment Committee, and played an important part in the conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. This “Lessons Learned” is based on a phone interview with Mr. Swagel.


Lessons Learned: Arthur Murton, Sandra Ward 2021 Yale University

Lessons Learned: Arthur Murton, Sandra Ward

The Journal of Financial Crises

Arthur Murton joined the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. in 1986 as a financial economist and rose through the ranks to become Director of the Division of Insurance and Research, a post he held from 1995 to 2013 and which he steered through the financial crisis of 2007-09. Murton participated in the important interagency discussions held on Columbus Day weekend in 2008 that led to the establishment of breakthrough programs that proved critical in stabilizing financial markets. This “Lessons Learned” summary is based on an interview with Mr. Murton about his crisis experience.


Lessons Learned: Diane Ellis, Sandra Ward 2021 Yale University

Lessons Learned: Diane Ellis, Sandra Ward

The Journal of Financial Crises

Diane Ellis served as Deputy Director, Insurance and Research, at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. during the financial crisis of 2007-09. The FDIC played a critical role in stabilizing financial conditions and establishing confidence in the financial markets by guaranteeing newly issued debt on a temporary basis for banks and thrifts as well as financial holding companies and eligible bank affiliates. The agency also fully guaranteed certain non-interest-bearing transaction deposit accounts. Ellis played an important role in implementing the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program that proved so critical in stemming the crisis. This “Lessons Learned” is based on a phone interview ...


National Asset Management Agency (Nama), Alexander Nye 2021 Yale University School of Management

National Asset Management Agency (Nama), Alexander Nye

The Journal of Financial Crises

After the Irish property boom peaked in 2007, Ireland’s banks faced declining share prices and increasing liquidity pressures. When in the aftermath of the September 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers, Ireland’s banks lost access to liquidity from abroad, it triggered a banking crisis in the country. In spite of various responses by the Irish government, the financial viability of Ireland’s banks (as well as the government’s fiscal position) continued to deteriorate in early 2009. The Irish government attributed the problem to impaired real estate assets sitting on bank balance sheets, which made it difficult for markets ...


Ghana Non-Performing Asset Recovery Trust (Npart), Riki Matsumoto 2021 Yale Program on Financial Stability

Ghana Non-Performing Asset Recovery Trust (Npart), Riki Matsumoto

The Journal of Financial Crises

The Ghanaian financial sector was in severe distress in 1985 after a decade of high and variable rates of inflation, low economic growth, and financial policies ill-suited to the country’s goals. Ghana, with World Bank support, implemented a Financial Sector Adjustment Program (FINSAP) between 1988-1997. To comply with the FINSAP, the Government established the Non-Performing Assets Recovery Trust (NPART) as a temporary public asset management company under Provisional National Defence Council Law 242 on February 28, 1990, with an initial 6-year statutory life, for the purpose of: 1) facilitating the restructuring and recapitalization of major state-owned banks; 2) expediting ...


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