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From Regional To Intercontinental Trade: The Successive European Trade Empires From The Sixteenth To The Eighteenth Century In Asia, sami bensassi 2009 University of Portsmouth

From Regional To Intercontinental Trade: The Successive European Trade Empires From The Sixteenth To The Eighteenth Century In Asia, Sami Bensassi

Sami Bensassi

For a very long time, the areas available for continuous long-distance trade were limited to territories the size of Braudel's Mediterranée (1949). Whatever the commercial organizations (merchants in the Roman or the Fatimid Empires, the Hanseatic League, the Florentine Companies), their trade was not able to directly handle branches more than a month's sailing from their main base (in the best conditions). During the three centuries after Vasco de Gama had reached India, European trading areas dramatically expanded to the shores of Asia, and a long period of harsh competition set the East India Companies of the main ...


Novas Ameaças, Instituições E Tensões Geopolíticas Nos Complexos Regionais De Segurança Da América Central E Caribe E Da América Do Sul, Eloi Martins Senhoras 2009 Federal University of Roraima (UFRR)

Novas Ameaças, Instituições E Tensões Geopolíticas Nos Complexos Regionais De Segurança Da América Central E Caribe E Da América Do Sul, Eloi Martins Senhoras

Elói Martins Senhoras

No abstract provided.


The Economic Impact Of Shale Gas Extraction: A Review Of Existing Studies, Thomas C. Kinnaman 2009 Bucknell University

The Economic Impact Of Shale Gas Extraction: A Review Of Existing Studies, Thomas C. Kinnaman

Thomas C. Kinnaman

No abstract provided.


A Theory Of Military Dictatorships, Daron Acemoglu, Davide Ticchi, Andrea Vindigni 2009 MIT

A Theory Of Military Dictatorships, Daron Acemoglu, Davide Ticchi, Andrea Vindigni

Andrea Vindigni

We investigate how nondemocratic regimes use the military and how this can lead to the emergence of military dictatorships. The elite may build a strong military and make the concessions necessary for the military to behave as their perfect agent, or they may risk the military turning against them. Once transition to democracy takes place, a strong military poses a threat against the nascent democratic regime until it is reformed. We study the role of income inequality and natural resources in the emergence of military dictatorships and show how the national defense role of the military may facilitate democratic consolidation.


Monopolistic Screening Under Learning By Doing, Dennis L. Gärtner 2009 University of Bonn

Monopolistic Screening Under Learning By Doing, Dennis L. Gärtner

Dennis L Gärtner

This article investigates the design of incentives in a dynamic adverse selection framework where agents’ production technologies display learning effects and agents’ learning rates are private knowledge. In a simple two-period model with full commitment available to the principal, we show that whether learning effects are over- or underexploited crucially depends on whether more efficient agents also learn faster (so costs diverge through learning effects) or whether it is the less efficient agents who learn faster (so costs converge). We further show that an overexploitation of learning effects can occur also if the full-commitment assumption is relaxed.


Global Reuse And Optimal Waste Policy, Thomas C. Kinnaman 2009 Bucknell University

Global Reuse And Optimal Waste Policy, Thomas C. Kinnaman

Thomas C. Kinnaman

No abstract provided.


O Mercado, Sergio Da Silva 2009 Federal University of Santa Catarina

O Mercado, Sergio Da Silva

Sergio Da Silva

No abstract provided.


Admin - First Day - Reading 2, Alexander Volokh 2009 Emory Law School

Admin - First Day - Reading 2, Alexander Volokh

Alexander Volokh

No abstract provided.


Trade Growth, Production Fragmentation And China's Environment, Judith M. Dean, Mary E. Lovely 2009 US International Trade Commission

Trade Growth, Production Fragmentation And China's Environment, Judith M. Dean, Mary E. Lovely

Judith M Dean

In recent years, China has experienced both rapidly growing trade and serious environmental degradation. The large literature on trade and environment lends some credence to the idea that these are causally related: trade growth for a relatively poor country is thought to shift the composition of industrial output towards dirtier products, aggravating environmental damage. However, much of China’s trade growth is attributable to the international fragmentation of production and the growing dominance of trade in parts and components. This kind of trade could lead to “cleaner” trade if fragmented production occurs in cleaner goods or China specializes in cleaner ...


Lessons Of The Alaska Dividend, Karl Widerquist 2009 Georgetown University-Qatar

Lessons Of The Alaska Dividend, Karl Widerquist

Karl Widerquist

At a time when progressive social policies are under attack across the industrialized world, the Alaska Dividend continues to be extremely popular. It distributes a yearly dividend to every man, woman, and child in Alaska without any conditions whatsoever. It has helped Alaska maintain one of the lowest poverty rates in the United States. It has helped Alaska become the most economically equal of all 50 states. And it has helped Alaska become the only U.S. state in which equality has risen rather than fallen over the last 20 years. Certainly Alaska is doing something right. As newsletter editor ...


The Size And Structure Of Government, Bryane Michael, Maja Popov 2009 Columbia University

The Size And Structure Of Government, Bryane Michael, Maja Popov

Bryane Michael (bryane.michael@stcatz.ox.ac.uk)

Does government size and structure adapt to changes in government’s organisational environment (particularly to uncertainty and complexity) as predicted by organisational theory? We find – using a range of statistical analyses – support for each of the major theories of organisation adaptation (the contingency-based view, resource-based view, and rational choice view). We find that both government size and structure change – holding other factors constant – for changes in the uncertainty and complexity of governments’ organisational environments. We find seven clusters of governments which adapt their organisational sizes differently in response to changes in the uncertainty and complexity of their organisational environments – and ...


Concentration, Diversity, And Manufacturing Performance., Joshua Drucker 2009 University of Illinois at Chicago

Concentration, Diversity, And Manufacturing Performance., Joshua Drucker

Joshua Drucker

(earlier version of Growth and Change 2013)

Regional economist Benjamin Chinitz was one of the most successful proponents of the idea that
regional industrial structure is an important determinant of economic performance. His
influential article in the American Economic Review in 1961 prompted substantial research
measuring industrial structure at the regional scale and examining its relationships to economic
outcomes. A considerable portion of this work operationalized the concept of regional industrial
structure as sectoral diversity, the degree to which the composition of an economy is spread
across heterogeneous activities. Diversity is a relatively simple construct to measure and
interpret, but ...


Public Information And Electoral Bias, Curtis R. Taylor, Huseyin Yildirim 2009 Duke University

Public Information And Electoral Bias, Curtis R. Taylor, Huseyin Yildirim

Huseyin Yildirim

No abstract provided.


The Defense-Growth Relationship: An Economic Investigation Into Post-Soviet States, Bruce D. McDonald III, Robert J. Eger III 2009 Florida State University

The Defense-Growth Relationship: An Economic Investigation Into Post-Soviet States, Bruce D. Mcdonald Iii, Robert J. Eger Iii

Bruce D. McDonald, III

An important question stemming from the collapse of the Soviet Union is how defense spending has influenced the economic performance of the 15 member states since their establishment as market economies. This study furthers the understanding of the relationship between defense spending and economic growth using data from the states of the former Soviet Union from 1992 to 2007. A nonlinear production function was used for direct effects, and models of investment and employment were employed for indirect effects. Contrary to expectations, the findings show that continued reliance on the defense sector in post-Soviet states has helped overall economic growth ...


Staying Put: A Rebuttal To Tiebout, Bruce D. McDonald III 2009 Florida State University

Staying Put: A Rebuttal To Tiebout, Bruce D. Mcdonald Iii

Bruce D. McDonald, III

Charles Tiebout’s belief that people “vote with their feet” for communities with optimal combinations of public goods and tax levels has played a pivotal role in local public financing since it was first published in 1956. Despite the reliance upon Tiebout’s hypothesis within the literature, recent empirical work has shown mixed support. While researchers have begun to reconsider the modeling techniques used, what they have missed is a recent change in the nature of local governments. A rising belief within the organizational literature is that institutions gain legitimacy through isomorphic tendencies. This paper follows the isomorphic debate and ...


Understanding The M-Form Hypothesis, Matthew J. Holian 2009 San Jose State University

Understanding The M-Form Hypothesis, Matthew J. Holian

Matthew J. Holian

The theory of the firm deserves to play a prominent role in both the undergraduate and graduate industrial organization curriculum, both because of the vast amount of attention that has been paid to this area over the last four decades, as well as its practical relevance for strategy and antitrust. This lecture briefly presents some background on the theory of the firm in general, and the M-form Hypothesis in particular. The M-form Hypothesis is an important theory of firm structure, developed by Chandler (1962) and Williamson (1975). A mathematical model, discussion section and accompanying lecture slides illustrate the concepts necessary ...


Subsidiarity: Challenging The Top Down Bias, Scott Kelley 2009 DePaul University

Subsidiarity: Challenging The Top Down Bias, Scott Kelley

Scott Kelley

Global poverty has received significant attention in the past decade, particularly after the adoption of the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals in 2002. Commentators and ethicists like Peter Singer have long held that the wealthy of the world have an obligation to help the poor. While the sentiments may be positive, there are real harms that have come from this kind of top down thinking. Subsidiarity, to the contrary, is a much more realistic and morally tenable approach to global poverty.


Admin - First Day - Reading 1, Alexander Volokh 2009 Emory Law School

Admin - First Day - Reading 1, Alexander Volokh

Alexander Volokh

No abstract provided.


The Persistence Of Accounting Versus Economic Profit, Matthew J. Holian, Ali Reza 2009 San Jose State University

The Persistence Of Accounting Versus Economic Profit, Matthew J. Holian, Ali Reza

Matthew J. Holian

Drawing on Schumpeterian theory, this article presents estimates of a first-order autoregressive model of profit persistence for large US firms, using Economic Value Added (EVA), the popular measure of profits produced by Stern Stewart and Company, and simple (unadjusted) accounting measures from the Compustat database. We hypothesize about the differences we should expect to find between these two sets of estimates, and also provide a fresh normative assessment of the dynamic competitiveness of the US economy.


If A Pure Market Economy Is So Good, Why Doesn’T It Exist? The Importance Of Changing Preferences Versus Incentives In Social Change, JEFFREY ROGERS HUMMEL, Edward P. Stringham 2009 San Jose State University

If A Pure Market Economy Is So Good, Why Doesn’T It Exist? The Importance Of Changing Preferences Versus Incentives In Social Change, Jeffrey Rogers Hummel, Edward P. Stringham

Jeffrey Rogers Hummel

Many economists argue that a pure market economy cannot come about because people will always have incentives to use coercion (Cowen and Sutter, 2005; Holcombe, 2004). We maintain that these economists leave out an important factor in social change. Change can come about by altering incentives or preferences, but since most neoclassical economists ignore changing preferences, they too quickly conclude that change is impossible. History shows that social change based on changes in preferences is common. By recognizing that preferences need not be constant, political economists can say much more about changing the world.


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