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Crop Residues: The Rest Of The Story, Douglas L. Karlen, Rattan Lal, Ronald F. Follett, John M. Kimble, Jerry L. Hatfield, John A. Miranowski, Cynthia A. Cambardella, Andrew Manale, Robert P. Anex, Charles W. Rice 2017 United States Department of Agriculture

Crop Residues: The Rest Of The Story, Douglas L. Karlen, Rattan Lal, Ronald F. Follett, John M. Kimble, Jerry L. Hatfield, John A. Miranowski, Cynthia A. Cambardella, Andrew Manale, Robert P. Anex, Charles W. Rice

Douglas L Karlen

Synopsis In the February 15, 2009 issue of ES&T Strand and Benford argued that oceanic deposition of agricultural crop residues was a viable option for net carbon sequestration (43 [4], 1000−1007). In reviewing the calculations and bringing their experience to bear, Karlen et al. argue in this Viewpoint that crop residue oceanic permanent sequestration (CROPS) as envisioned by Strand and Benford will not work. They further propose alternative possibilities in agricultural methods to achieve a net decrease of CO2 emissions.


Economic Evaluation Of Coastal Land Loss In Louisiana, Stephen R. Barnes, Craig Bond, Nicholas Burger, Kate Anania, Aaron Strong, Sarah Weilant, Stephanie Virgets 2017 Louisiana State University

Economic Evaluation Of Coastal Land Loss In Louisiana, Stephen R. Barnes, Craig Bond, Nicholas Burger, Kate Anania, Aaron Strong, Sarah Weilant, Stephanie Virgets

Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics

Louisiana has lost approximately 1,880 square miles of land over the past eighty years. Projections suggest that in a future without action, the next fifty years could result in the loss of 1,750 additional square miles of land area. As land loss continues, a large portion of the natural and man-made capital stocks of coastal Louisiana will be at greater risk of damage, either from land loss or from the associated increase in storm damage. We estimate the replacement cost of capital stock directly at risk from land loss ranges from approximately $2.1 billion to $3.5 ...


The Market Transfer Effect In The Hawaiian Longline Fishery: Why Correlation Does Not Imply Causation, Jason D. Scorse, Shaun Richards, Philip King 2017 Middlebury Institute of International Studies

The Market Transfer Effect In The Hawaiian Longline Fishery: Why Correlation Does Not Imply Causation, Jason D. Scorse, Shaun Richards, Philip King

Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics

A lot of discussion and controversy has surrounded whether the “market transfer” effect in the Hawaii longline swordfish fishery occurred during the swordfish closure of 2001-2004, because of its potential impacts on sea turtle mortality. The primary academic work in support of the market transfer effect during the closure is a paper by Rausser et al. (2009): “Unintended Consequences: The Spillover Effects of Common Property Regulations.” In this paper, the authors claim to find evidence in support of the market transfer hypothesis.To our knowledge, no analysis has yet been undertaken to assess whether this analysis is sound, and yet ...


More Balanced Economic Growth, Eric Thompson 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

More Balanced Economic Growth, Eric Thompson

Business in Nebraska

There has been a re-balancing of both global and domestic economic growth during 2017. Globally, growth is improving in Europe and China, yielding more balanced international growth. Within the United States, growth also has become more balanced across industries. As in past years, the service sector, supported by growth in employment and real wages, has grown steadily with increases in retail trade, business services, personal services and construction activity. However, in recent months, there also has been improved growth in the industrial sector, with a rebound in the energy sector, and more business investment in capital equipment. The result is ...


Economic Impacts Of Wind Energy Development In Iowa: Four Scenarios, David Swenson 2017 Iowa State University

Economic Impacts Of Wind Energy Development In Iowa: Four Scenarios, David Swenson

David Swenson

The deployment of additional wind energy capacity in Iowa will yield discernible short-term and longer-term economic impacts for Iowa. The short-term and temporary economic gains are from the annual purchases and deliveries of Iowa-supplied wind energy generating equipment like blades, towers, nacelles and other critical components, and all construction-related activity associated with erecting and making operational wind energy arrays The long-term and permanent gains to the Iowa economy are driven by the on-going increments to statewide productivity associated with the operation and maintenance of the built wind energy systems, and the incremental increase in lease payments made to landowners for ...


The Economic Value Of The University Of Northern Iowa, David Swenson 2017 Iowa State University

The Economic Value Of The University Of Northern Iowa, David Swenson

David Swenson

This analysis measures the regional economic value of the University of Northern Iowa. There are two dimensions evaluated: the overall worth of operating the university and the value of student spending in the area economy. This analysis incorporates a number of best practices for measuring the worth of universities to regional economies.


Tax Increment Financing Growth In Iowa, Dave Swenson, Liesl Eathington 2017 Iowa State University

Tax Increment Financing Growth In Iowa, Dave Swenson, Liesl Eathington

David Swenson

Tax increment financing (TIF) is a mechanism authorized by Iowa law allowing local governments, primarily cities, to capture the taxes collected on property valuation growth in a specified district. The incremental taxes are intended to be used for one or more of the following: bond payments on borrowing required to prepare the district for development; rebates on taxes to developers meeting specific, albeit locally determined, criteria; direct spending by the local government to develop an area; or outright tax refunds to qualifying developments. The use of TIF authority among Iowa’s cities is extremely popular. In fiscal 1991, there were ...


The Economic Impact Of Iowa’S Major Industries In 2014, David Swenson 2017 Iowa State University

The Economic Impact Of Iowa’S Major Industries In 2014, David Swenson

David Swenson

This report compares and contrasts two methods of discerning industrial importance: (1) evaluating industrial information as conventionally reported by government agencies, and (2) using input-output techniques to allocate all indirect economic activity into industries producing for final demand. The advantage of the final demand apportioning procedure is that it allows for a determination of total job linkages to Iowa's key industries like agriculture, ag-related manufacturing, all other manufacturing, and to banking and finance.


The Economic Value Of Iowa’S Public Universities, David Swenson 2017 Iowa State University

The Economic Value Of Iowa’S Public Universities, David Swenson

David Swenson

This analysis measures the economic value of Iowa’s public universities – The University of Iowa, Iowa State University, and the University of Northern Iowa. There are two dimensions evaluated: the overall worth of operating the universities as educational and service institutions and the value of student spending in their respective area economies. This analysis incorporates a number of best practices for measuring the worth of universities to regional economies.


Using Implan To Evaluate Public Universities Regional Economic Inpacts, David Swenson 2017 Iowa State University

Using Implan To Evaluate Public Universities Regional Economic Inpacts, David Swenson

David Swenson

This is a how-to manual for utilizing the IMPLAN impact analysis program when measuring the worth of public universities to regional economies. This paper describes four approaches to measuring university economic values ranging from simple modification to the elements of value added to producing highly itemized "bill of goods" types of specifications. It compares the four methods to one another as well as to a formal RIMS II analysis of the same institution by the U.S. BEA.


The Economic Value Of The University Of Iowa Hospitals And Clinics, David Swenson 2017 Iowa State University

The Economic Value Of The University Of Iowa Hospitals And Clinics, David Swenson

David Swenson

This analysis measures the regional economic value of The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (hereafter, UIHC). The assessment looks at UIHC operational expenditures using a properly specified regional input-output model that accurately reflects its major spending categories and its primary territory of economic influence. This analysis does not contain an estimate of the regional economic boost attributable to patients or the families of patients traveling to the Iowa City metropolitan area for services or other visits. An estimate of those values would require a scientifically valid survey of visitors and patients that details average duration of stay and the ...


Misadventures In Regionalism: Reaffirming The Importance Of Central Places In Regional Economic Development Assistance, David Swenson, Liesl Eathington 2017 Iowa State University

Misadventures In Regionalism: Reaffirming The Importance Of Central Places In Regional Economic Development Assistance, David Swenson, Liesl Eathington

David Swenson

Multi‐jurisdictional regional planning and problem solving approaches have been the mainstay in rural development efforts in recent decades, and regional partnerships are often a prerequisite for state or federal funding. The authors believe that many such initiatives utilize regions of convenience rather than regions of substance. This paper describes a shift in our preferred geography for providing research and technical assistance in nonmetropolitan areas in Iowa. This shift has led us, at least regarding rural development assistance, to move towards emphasizing the provision of community development services to regionally‐important nonmetropolitan urban centers, i.e., central places that clearly ...


Investigating Iowa’S Industrial Vulnerability To Reductions In Water Resources, David Swenson, Liesl Eathington 2017 Iowa State University

Investigating Iowa’S Industrial Vulnerability To Reductions In Water Resources, David Swenson, Liesl Eathington

David Swenson

This report investigates degrees of water dependence across various sectors of Iowa’s economy and the possible direct and indirect consequences of drought events on Iowa’s industries. The report is organized into five sections. Part 1 describes patterns of water use by broad economic sector, as measured in gallons of water withdrawn from surface and groundwater sources. Part 2 addresses the importance of water as a means of transportation, examining the types of commodities shipped to and from Iowa by river. Part 3 discusses the consequences of drought on grain and livestock production. Part 4 explores how reductions in ...


Nonfarm Employment Change In Iowa From 1987 To 1997, Liesl Eathington, David Swenson, Daniel M. Otto 2017 Iowa State University

Nonfarm Employment Change In Iowa From 1987 To 1997, Liesl Eathington, David Swenson, Daniel M. Otto

David Swenson

The pace and patterns of growth in Iowa's economy have produced distinct groups of winners and losers during the past decade. Drastic differences are evident in both the geographic location and industrial mix of employment growth. New groups of industries are gaining importance to the state's economy, mirroring trends in the national economy. In other industries, Iowa is out of step with the rest of the nation. Some industries in decline nationally are growing in Iowa, and in still other industries, Iowa's growth lags behind national rates. These industrial strengths and weaknesses are distributed unevenly across the ...


Economic Impacts Of Wind Energy Development In Iowa: Four Scenarios, David Swenson 2017 Iowa State University

Economic Impacts Of Wind Energy Development In Iowa: Four Scenarios, David Swenson

David Swenson

The deployment of additional wind energy capacity in Iowa will yield discernible short-term and longer-term economic impacts for Iowa. The short-term and temporary economic gains are from

  • the annual purchases and deliveries of Iowa-supplied wind energy generating equipment like blades, towers, nacelles and other critical components, and
  • all construction-related activity associated with erecting and making operational wind energy arrays

The long-term and permanent gains to the Iowa economy are driven by

  • the on-going increments to statewide productivity associated with the operation and maintenance of the built wind energy systems, and
  • the incremental increase in lease payments made to landowners for ...


Equilibrium Selection In Global Games With Strategic Complementarities, David M. Frankel, Stephen Morris, Ady Pauzner 2017 Iowa State University

Equilibrium Selection In Global Games With Strategic Complementarities, David M. Frankel, Stephen Morris, Ady Pauzner

David Frankel

We study games with strategic complementarities, arbitrary numbers of players and actions, and slightly noisy payoff signals. We prove limit uniqueness: as the signal noise vanishes, the game has a unique strategy profile that survives iterative dominance. This generalizes a result of Carlsson and van Damme (Econometrica 61 (1993) 989–1018) for two-player, two-action games. The surviving profile, however, may depend on fine details of the structure of the noise. We provide sufficient conditions on payoffs for there to be noise-independent selection.


Nebraska Business And Consumer Confidence Indexes: June 2, 2017, Eric Thompson 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Nebraska Business And Consumer Confidence Indexes: June 2, 2017, Eric Thompson

Leading Economic Indicator Reports

Consumer confidence fell in Nebraska during May 2017 while business confidence remained very strong. The Consumer Confidence Index – Nebraska (CCI-N) fell to roughly neutral during May. The CCI-N stood at 102.5 in April but fell to 100.4 during May, which is only slightly above the neutral value of 100.0. The outlook of Nebraska businesses remained very strong. The Business Confidence Index – Nebraska (BCI-N) rose to 110.2 in May, above its April value of 109.1 and well above the neutral value. Business confidence has been very strong in Nebraska during the first five months of 2017 ...


Evaluating Food-Fuel Trade-Offs Via Market Choice: The Case Of Iowa Corn Producers, Tun-Hsiang Yu, Chad Hart, Wen You 2017 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Evaluating Food-Fuel Trade-Offs Via Market Choice: The Case Of Iowa Corn Producers, Tun-Hsiang Yu, Chad Hart, Wen You

Chad Hart

This study examines food-fuel trade-offs from the perspective of crop producers and their choices in marketing their grain among food, feed and fuel use. Based on a recent survey of Iowa grain producers, this study finds that price competition from ethanol plants has increased the share of the corn marketed directly to ethanol plants and lowered the market share of corn marketed for domestic and international food/feed purposes. Other factors, such as farm size and market distance, affect the share of corn directed to the fuel, food, and feed markets. The results indicate corn producers are willing to bear ...


Using A Farmer's Beta For Improved Estimation Of Expected Yields, Miguel A. Carriquiry, Bruce Babcock, Chad E. Hart 2017 Iowa State University

Using A Farmer's Beta For Improved Estimation Of Expected Yields, Miguel A. Carriquiry, Bruce Babcock, Chad E. Hart

Chad Hart

Effects of sampling error in estimation of farmers' mean yields for crop insurance purposes and their implications for actuarial soundness are explored using farm- level corn yield data in Iowa. Results indicate that sampling error, combined with nonlinearities in the indemnity function, leads to empirically estimated insurance rates that exceed actuarially fair values. The difference depends on the coverage level, the number of observations used, and the participation strategy followed by farmers. A new estimator for mean yields based on the decomposition of farm yields into systemic and idiosyncratic components is proposed, which could lead to improved rate-making and reduce ...


An Insurance Approach To Risk Management In The Ethanol Industry, Nicholas D. Paulson, Bruce Babcock, Chad E. Hart, Dermot J. Hayes 2017 University of Illinois

An Insurance Approach To Risk Management In The Ethanol Industry, Nicholas D. Paulson, Bruce Babcock, Chad E. Hart, Dermot J. Hayes

Chad Hart

The vast majority of crop and revenue insurance policies sold in the United States are single-crop policies that insure against low yields or revenues for each crop grown on the farm. But, increasingly, producer income is based more on the value of crops that have been converted into a value-added product such as ethanol. Moreover, the recent increases in energy and commodity price levels and volatilities emphasize the importance of risk management to ethanol investors. This paper uses an insurance approach to outline a risk management tool which mimics the gross margin level of a typical corn-based ethanol plant. The ...


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