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Biological and Physical Anthropology Commons

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737 full-text articles. Page 7 of 30.

Front Matter Andean Past 12, 2016 The University of Maine

Front Matter Andean Past 12

Andean Past

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2016 The University of Maine

Table Of Contents

Andean Past

No abstract provided.


Editor's Preface Andean Past 12, Monica Barnes 2016 American Museum of Natural History

Editor's Preface Andean Past 12, Monica Barnes

Andean Past

No abstract provided.


Obituaries Andean Past 12, Monica Barnes, A. Jorge Arellano-Lopez, Bill Sillar 2016 American Museum of Natural History

Obituaries Andean Past 12, Monica Barnes, A. Jorge Arellano-Lopez, Bill Sillar

Andean Past

No abstract provided.


Health At The Edge Of The Wari Empire: An Analysis Of Skeletal Remains From Hatun Cotuyoc, Huaro, Peru, Sara L. Juengst, Maeve Skidmore 2016 Appalachian State University

Health At The Edge Of The Wari Empire: An Analysis Of Skeletal Remains From Hatun Cotuyoc, Huaro, Peru, Sara L. Juengst, Maeve Skidmore

Andean Past

No abstract provided.


Demographic Analysis Of A Looted Late Intermediate Period Tomb, Chincha Valley, Peru, Camille Weinberg, Benjamin T. Nigra, Maria Cecilia Lozada, Charles S. Stanish, Henry Tantalean, Jacob Bongers, Terra Jones 2016 The University of Texas at Austin

Demographic Analysis Of A Looted Late Intermediate Period Tomb, Chincha Valley, Peru, Camille Weinberg, Benjamin T. Nigra, Maria Cecilia Lozada, Charles S. Stanish, Henry Tantalean, Jacob Bongers, Terra Jones

Andean Past

No abstract provided.


Research Reports Andean Past 12, David Chicoine, Beverly Clement, Kyle Stitch, Catherine M. Bencic, Alejandro Chu, Monica Barnes, Simon Urbina, Leonor Adan, Constanza Pellegrino, Estefania Vidal, Alina Álvarez Larrain 2016 Louisiana State University

Research Reports Andean Past 12, David Chicoine, Beverly Clement, Kyle Stitch, Catherine M. Bencic, Alejandro Chu, Monica Barnes, Simon Urbina, Leonor Adan, Constanza Pellegrino, Estefania Vidal, Alina Álvarez Larrain

Andean Past

No abstract provided.


Dietary Adaptations And Intra- And Interspecific Variation In Dental Occlusal Shape In Hominin And Non-Hominin Primates, Kelsey O'Neill 2016 Virginia Commonwealth University

Dietary Adaptations And Intra- And Interspecific Variation In Dental Occlusal Shape In Hominin And Non-Hominin Primates, Kelsey O'Neill

Theses and Dissertations

Dental morphology and tooth shape have been used to recreate the

dietary adaptations for extinct species, and thus dental variation can provide

information on the relationship between fossil species and their

paleoenvironments. Variation in living species with known behaviors can provide

a baseline for interpreting morphology, and behavior, in the fossil record.

Tooth occlusal surface outlines in hominins and non-hominin primates, and other

mammals, have been used for assessments of taxonomic significance, with

variability often considered as being primarily phylogenetic. Few studies have

attempted to assess how diet might influence the pattern of variability in closely

related species. Here the ...


Early Horizon Camelid Management Practices In The Nepeña Valley, North-Central Coast Of Peru, Paul Szpak, David Chicone, Jean-François Millaire, Christine D. White, Rebecca Parry, Fred Longstaffe 2016 The University of Western Ontario

Early Horizon Camelid Management Practices In The Nepeña Valley, North-Central Coast Of Peru, Paul Szpak, David Chicone, Jean-François Millaire, Christine D. White, Rebecca Parry, Fred Longstaffe

Earth Sciences Publications

South American camelids (llamas and alpacas) were of great economic, social and ritual significance in the pre-Hispanic Andes. Although these animals are largely limited to high-altitude (>3500 masl) pastures, it has been hypothesised that camelids were also raised at lower altitudes in the arid coastal river valleys. Previous isotopic studies of Early Intermediate Period (c. 200 BC - AD 600) and Middle Horizon (c. AD 600 - 1100) camelids support this argument. Here, we utilise carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses of camelid bone collagen from the Early Horizon (c. 800 - 200 BC) sites of Caylán and Huambacho on the north-central coast of ...


Stable Isotopes And Selective Forces: Examples In Biocultural And Environmental Anthropology, Christine D. White, Fred J. Longstaffe 2016 The University of Western Ontario

Stable Isotopes And Selective Forces: Examples In Biocultural And Environmental Anthropology, Christine D. White, Fred J. Longstaffe

Earth Sciences Publications

No abstract provided.


Isotopic Anthropology Of Rural German Medieval Diet: Intra- And Inter-Population Variability, Karyn C. Olsen, Christine D. White, Fred J. Longstaffe, Frank J. Rühli, Christina Warinner, Domingo S. Salazar-Garcia 2016 The University of Western Ontario

Isotopic Anthropology Of Rural German Medieval Diet: Intra- And Inter-Population Variability, Karyn C. Olsen, Christine D. White, Fred J. Longstaffe, Frank J. Rühli, Christina Warinner, Domingo S. Salazar-Garcia

Earth Sciences Publications

This study investigates the diet of an 11th century CE parish community located in northwestern Germany. We assessed the isotopic compositions of human (n = 24) and faunal (n = 17) bone collagen (δ13Ccol, δ15Ncol) and human structural carbonate (δ13Csc) using skeletal material recovered from the Dalheim cemetery. Traditional interpretation of the isotopic data indicates that Dalheim residents likely relied on a C3 plant-based diet and consumed some terrestrial animal products without evidence of marine resource input in the diet. Bivariate and multivariate models used as an additional means to assess diet ...


Homo Heidelbergensis: The Tool To Our Success, Alexander Burkard 2016 Virginia Commonwealth University

Homo Heidelbergensis: The Tool To Our Success, Alexander Burkard

Auctus: The Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Scholarship

Homo heidelbergensis, a physiological variant of the species Homo sapien, is an extinct species that existed in both Europe and parts of Asia from 700,000 years ago to roughly 300,000 years ago (carbon dating). This “subspecies” of Homo sapiens, as it is formally classified, is a direct ancestor of anatomically modern humans, and is understood to have many of the same physiological characteristics as those of anatomically modern humans while still expressing many of the same physiological attributes of Homo erectus, an earlier human ancestor. Since Homo heidelbergensis represents attributes of both species, it has therefore earned the ...


Using The Protein Leverage Hypothesis To Understand Socioeconomic Variation In Diet And Obesity, Traci Allison Bekelman 2016 University of Colorado Boulder

Using The Protein Leverage Hypothesis To Understand Socioeconomic Variation In Diet And Obesity, Traci Allison Bekelman

Anthropology Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Background: The rising prevalence of obesity among the urban poor in Latin America is unexplained due to limited data on dietary intake and physical activity in this population. The Protein Leverage Hypothesis (PLH) predicts that when the proportion of protein in the diet is low, protein appetite will stimulate excess energy intake, and consequently obesity.

Objective: Guided by the PLH, this study evaluated an explanation for the inverse relationship between SES and obesity: limited access to dietary protein among low-SES women leads them to consume a lower proportion of protein in the diet which, in turn, drives higher energy intake ...


Forest Resource Overlap In Humans And Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkeys Of Ha Giang Province, Vietnam: Theoretical And Conservation Implications, Amy Louise Harrison Levine 2016 University of Colorado at Boulder

Forest Resource Overlap In Humans And Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkeys Of Ha Giang Province, Vietnam: Theoretical And Conservation Implications, Amy Louise Harrison Levine

Anthropology Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Co-occurring primates differentiate habitats and resource use patterns across spatial and temporal scales. Such differential forest use can play a significant role in resource partitioning, especially in phylogenetically related taxa. When it comes to primate communities, however, it is all too often that human primates are excluded from such analyses. The research presented here is the first in-depth analysis of human-nonhuman primate forest use overlap in Vietnam. By applying a mixed methods toolkit, quantitative and qualitative data were gathered regarding people and monkeys sharing forest resources within the Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkey Species and Habitat Conservation Area. Direct observations of the ...


The Effects Of Dental Impairment On The Biology And Behavioral Ecology Of Wild Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur Catta) At The Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, James Burns Millette III 2016 University of Colorado at Boulder

The Effects Of Dental Impairment On The Biology And Behavioral Ecology Of Wild Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur Catta) At The Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, James Burns Millette Iii

Anthropology Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) of the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve (BMSR) demonstrate exceptionally high rates of dental wear and subsequent tooth loss due to tamarind fruit consumption. How such wear and loss affects their behavior, nutrition and health is not yet fully understood. This study examines how dental impairment impacts ring-tailed lemur biology and behavioral ecology through a broad dental-ecological framework involving use of topographic analyses of tooth form, food processing data collection, and fecal measures of nutritional status. This study also presents visual measures of coat and body condition applicable to dental studies. Increasing topographically-measured dental impairment was associated ...


Playing With Knives: The Socialization Of Self-Initiated Learners, David F. Lancy 2016 Utah State University

Playing With Knives: The Socialization Of Self-Initiated Learners, David F. Lancy

Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Faculty Publications

Since Margaret Mead’s field studies in the South Pacific a century ago, there has been the tacit understanding that as culture varies, so too must the socialization of children to become competent culture users and bearers. More recently, the work of anthropologists has been mined to find broader patterns that may be common to childhood across a range of societies. One improbable commonality has been the tolerance, even encouragement, of toddler behavior that is patently risky, such as playing with or attempting to use a sharp-edged tool. This laissez faire approach to socialization follows from a reliance on children ...


Maize Provisioning Of Ontario Late Woodland Turkeys: Isotopic Evidence Of Seasonal, Cultural, Spatial And Temporal Variation, Zoe Morris, Christine D. White, Lisa Hodgetts, Fred J. Longstaffe 2016 The University of Western Ontario

Maize Provisioning Of Ontario Late Woodland Turkeys: Isotopic Evidence Of Seasonal, Cultural, Spatial And Temporal Variation, Zoe Morris, Christine D. White, Lisa Hodgetts, Fred J. Longstaffe

Earth Sciences Publications

The isotopic composition (δ13C, δ15N) of bone collagen from Ontario Late Woodland archaeological turkeys was compared with that of modern Ontario wild turkeys, and archaeological turkeys from American Southwestern, Mexican and other Woodland sites to determine whether Late Woodland Ontario peoples managed wild turkeys by provisioning them with maize, the only isotopically distinct horticultural plant at that time. Despite the fact that humans from Late Woodland Western Basin and Iroquoian traditions consumed equal amounts of maize, wild turkeys utilized by the two groups exhibit different diets. Western Basin turkeys reflect a C3-only diet, whereas ...


Utilizing Craniometrics To Examine The Morphological Changes To Homo With The Advent Of Processing Food By Cooking, Julia Schorr 2016 University of Montana, Missoula

Utilizing Craniometrics To Examine The Morphological Changes To Homo With The Advent Of Processing Food By Cooking, Julia Schorr

Graduate Student Theses, Dissertations, & Professional Papers

This thesis examines the extent to which the development of cooking by early humans contributed to morphological changes in the human skull, hypothesizing that the cooking of food by early humans had a direct effect on human evolution, leading to smaller face shape, larger body size, and larger brain development, which can be measured in the skull using craniometrics. Beginning with Homo erectus around 1 million years ago, early humans began cooking food. By beginning the process of physical and chemical breakdown of food prior to consumption, humans were able to better access calories and nutrients already found in their ...


A Comparison Of The Utility Of Craniometric And Dental Morphological Data For Assessing Biodistance And Sex-Differential Migration In The Pacific Islands, Brittney A. Eubank 2016 University of Montana

A Comparison Of The Utility Of Craniometric And Dental Morphological Data For Assessing Biodistance And Sex-Differential Migration In The Pacific Islands, Brittney A. Eubank

Graduate Student Theses, Dissertations, & Professional Papers

Genetic analysis of maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNA and the paternally-inherited Y-chromosome yield contrasting pictures of movement of peoples into the Pacific Islands. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is a matrilocal residency pattern practiced by early Pacific settlers, in which Melanesian men were brought into settler communities to intermarry with local women, yielding a higher intrapopulation variance and lower interpopulation variance exhibited in males compared to females. This research investigates the possibility of sex-differential migration in the Oceanic populations of Easter Island, Fiji, Guam, Mokapu, and New Britain through analysis of biodistance based on dental morphological trait frequencies and craniometric measures ...


The Bridge River Dogs: Interpreting Adna And Stable Isotope Analysis Collected From Dog Remains, Emilia Tifental 2016 University of Montana

The Bridge River Dogs: Interpreting Adna And Stable Isotope Analysis Collected From Dog Remains, Emilia Tifental

Graduate Student Theses, Dissertations, & Professional Papers

Excavations at the Bridge River site have been on-going since 2003, increasing our understanding of the communities that inhabited the Middle Fraser Canyon, British Columbia over 1,000 years ago. The most recent excavation at Housepit 54 in the summer of 2014 supplied further data regarding relationships between people and their dogs. Dogs are well documented in the Middle Fraser Canyon through both archaeological excavations and traditional knowledge. A household's possession of a dog has been linked to other prestigious materials, and therefore been interpreted as an indicator of wealth and status. The present study was aimed at further ...


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