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P-04 Animation Of The Cultural Landscape Of Hisban And Vicinity In The Longue Duree, Oystein LaBianca 2017 Andrews University

P-04 Animation Of The Cultural Landscape Of Hisban And Vicinity In The Longue Duree, Oystein Labianca

Celebration of Research and Creative Scholarship

In today’s markets, archaeological publishing must include on-line presentation of findings using various technologies for rendering results, such as 3-D visualization and animation media. The goal of the present project is to build capacity here at the Institute of Archaeology in deployment of animation technologies for rendering of archaeological findings and narratives. To this end I have assembled a team of two graduate students with significant computer skills (Jared Wilson and Stanley Lebrun) and one undergraduate student (Paul Roschman) who will collaborate with me to animate, using Esri CityEngine software, the story of long-term change in the cultural landscape ...


A Real Rock Star, Mike James 2017 Ashland Daily Independent

A Real Rock Star, Mike James

Indian Head Rock Project

An article published in Ashland Daily Independent discussing the documentary film on the Indian Head Rock by Steve Middleton from November 2, 2017.


Forming Community Partnerships, Lori Foley 2017 Heritage Emergency National Task Force

Forming Community Partnerships, Lori Foley

CHAR

In the event of a disaster, regardless of the type or scope, the first response is always local. For the institutions and organizations charged with safeguarding the nation’s cultural and historic resources – museums, historical societies, libraries, and municipal offices, to name just a few – building relationships with local first responders and emergency managers before disaster strikes is key to ensuring the safety of staff and collections. State emergency management agencies are also collaborating with their state cultural agencies to protect these valuable and vulnerable resources. The resulting emergency networks better position the local community and the state to be ...


Lessons Learned From Culture In Crisis; Or Protecting The Past To Save The Future, Laurie Rush 2017 Fort Drum, NY

Lessons Learned From Culture In Crisis; Or Protecting The Past To Save The Future, Laurie Rush

CHAR

At the midpoint of the second decade of the 21st century, the world is experiencing deliberate destruction of cultural property at a scale not seen since the Second World War. Future protection and preservation of cultural heritage depends on learning from tragedy and applying these lessons as pro-actively as possible. First, we are discovering that no matter the threat, there are people who risk their lives to save artifacts and features of their culture, and the motives for this courage are retrospectively clear. For a community to survive a conflict or disaster as a corporate entity, elements of shared ...


Keynote Address - When Violent Nonstate Actors Target Cultural Heritage Sites, Victor Asal 2017 Dept. of Public Administration, University at Albany

Keynote Address - When Violent Nonstate Actors Target Cultural Heritage Sites, Victor Asal

CHAR

Why would organizations attack or kill people at cultural heritage sites or destroy such sites? Using data from the Big Allied and Dangerous insurgent dataset that has data on 140 insurgent organizations from 1998-2012, and data from the Global Terrorism Database, this presentation examines the factors that make insurgent groups more likely to attack such sites or kill people at such sites. We look at the impact of organizational ideology, organizational structure and power as well as country level factors.


Mitigation, Response And Recovery, Richard Lord 2017 NYS Div. of Homeland Security and Emergency Services

Mitigation, Response And Recovery, Richard Lord

CHAR

Abstract: Hurricane Harvey ravaged Texas and Louisiana nearly five years after Superstorm Sandy devastated the East Coast and caused 53 deaths, destroyed or severely damaged 100,000 Long Island homes, and left an estimated $42 billion in damages across New York State.

This session will provide an overview of the disaster relief and assistance programs available under the Stafford Act, when they are triggered, and how private non-profit and cultural institutions can plan for natural hazards and take full advantage of available aid. There will also be discussion of the NYS Hazard Mitigation Plan, the Community Risk and Resiliency Act ...


Informing Responders Using Gis And Gps, Deidre McCarthy 2017 Cultural Resources GIS Facility, National Park Service

Informing Responders Using Gis And Gps, Deidre Mccarthy

CHAR

Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast in August 2005 and created the single largest disaster for cultural resources that the United States has witnessed since the inception of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966. Notably, the NHPA created the National Register of Historic Places, our nation’s catalog of important cultural resources. The NHPA also stipulates that any federal undertaking which may adversely affect National Register eligible resources be mitigated. For the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Katrina created the largest compliance project ever under Section 106 of the NHPA.

Although causing a great deal of damage, Katrina ...


Keynote Address: Climate Change: From Global To New York Scale, Christopher D. Thorncroft 2017 Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University at Albany

Keynote Address: Climate Change: From Global To New York Scale, Christopher D. Thorncroft

CHAR

This talk is concerned with the science and impacts of climate change from global to New York scales. It will provide an assessment of how the climate has changed over the past Century based on a purely observational perspective. The scientific basis for anthroprogenic climate change will be explained and discussed including a description of the “greenhouse effect” and why it is important for life on this planet. We will briefly discuss global and local consequences of a warmer climate and what we need to be prepared for going forward in the coming decades.


Opening Keynote Address: Using Data To Understand Cultural Destruction, Brian I. Daniels 2017 Penn Cultural Heritage Center, University of Pennsylvania Museum

Opening Keynote Address: Using Data To Understand Cultural Destruction, Brian I. Daniels

CHAR

Brian I. Daniels, Ph.D, Penn Cultural Heritage Center, University of Pennsylvania Museum.

Why is cultural heritage targeted in conflict? Under what circumstances? By whom? Today, due in part to the recent notorious instances of cultural destruction in the Middle East and North Africa, there is perhaps more attention among the broader scientific community than ever before about the phenomenon of cultural loss. At the same time, there are many significant data and analytical gaps. Little social science literature about cultural destruction exists and many critical questions—and avenues of research—are, as of yet, unstudied. A primary reason for ...


Online Digital Exhibit With The Tippecanoe County Historical Association, Kathryn Math, Jinghong Zhu, Rajan Dalal 2017 Purdue University

Online Digital Exhibit With The Tippecanoe County Historical Association, Kathryn Math, Jinghong Zhu, Rajan Dalal

Purdue Journal of Service-Learning and International Engagement

We fi rst came into contact with the Tippecanoe County Historical Association (TCHA) through the fall 2016 honors course “Digital Histories,” led by Dr. Jennifer Bay. Our course project was to create a digital exhibition for the TCHA with a service-learning grant provided by Purdue University. In this collaboration, we were able to put into practice the theories and processes we learned in the classroom and gain both a working knowledge of archival techniques and an understanding of the relationship between the institution and the community. The exhibit “Planting Our Roots: The Immigrant Experience in Tippecanoe County” is the result ...


Introgression Makes Waves In Inferred Histories Of Effective Population Size, John Hawks 2017 University of Wisconsin-Madison

Introgression Makes Waves In Inferred Histories Of Effective Population Size, John Hawks

Human Biology Open Access Pre-Prints

Human populations have a complex history of introgression and of changing population size. Human genetic variation has been affected by both these processes, so that inference of past population size depends upon the pattern of gene flow and introgression among past populations. One remarkable aspect of human population history as inferred from genetics is a consistent “wave” of larger effective population size, found in both African and non-African populations, that appears to reflect events prior to the last 100,000 years. Here I carry out a series of simulations to investigate how introgression and gene flow from genetically divergent ancestral ...


A Microdebitage Analysis Of The Winterville Mounds Site (22ws500), Stephanie Leigh-Ann Guest 2017 University of Southern Mississippi

A Microdebitage Analysis Of The Winterville Mounds Site (22ws500), Stephanie Leigh-Ann Guest

Master's Theses

The Winterville Mounds site (22WS500) was a civic ceremonial center of 23 mounds and is located near Greenville in northwest Mississippi. Winterville excavations as field schools are ongoing since 2005 under the direction of Dr. H. Edwin Jackson of The University of Southern Mississippi. Examination of the >1/4" (6.35 mm) mesh screened lithic material provided mixed results of reduction stages and lacked variety of non-local materials (Guest 2006, Winter 2009, McClendon 2012). Authors of these analyses called for the examination of the 1/16” (1.58 mm) water-screened lithic material to identify reduction stages and traces of non-local ...


Exploring Community Formation And Coalescence At The Late 14th-Early 15th Century Tillsonburg Village Site, Rebecca Parry 2017 The University of Western Ontario

Exploring Community Formation And Coalescence At The Late 14th-Early 15th Century Tillsonburg Village Site, Rebecca Parry

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

This thesis examines the Tillsonburg Village’s particularly large and dispersed community plan through an intra-site analysis of ceramic vessels and longhouse attributes, as these are considered useful indicators of social, organizational, and temporal processes. The archaeological site in Tillsonburg, Ontario dates to the late Middle Iroquoian Period (AD 1350-1420). Community coalescence involves the aggregation of previously separate social groups into one communal settlement. It is explored as the predominant conceptual approach to better understand the formation of the Tillsonburg Village’s community plan. However, other processes relating to the contemporaneity of village areas or houses are also considered. Spatial ...


Virtual Archaeology, Virtual Longhouses And "Envisioning The Unseen" Within The Archaeological Record, William M. Carter 2017 The University of Western Ontario

Virtual Archaeology, Virtual Longhouses And "Envisioning The Unseen" Within The Archaeological Record, William M. Carter

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

We are of an era in which digital technology now enhances the method and practice of archaeology. In our rush to embrace these technological advances however, Virtual Archaeology has become a practice to visualize the archaeological record, yet it is still searching for its methodological and theoretical base. I submit that Virtual Archaeology is the digital making and interrogating of the archaeological unknown. By wayfaring means, through the synergy of the maker, digital tools and material, archaeologists make meaning of the archaeological record by engaging the known archaeological data with the crafting of new knowledge by multimodal reflection and the ...


The Richness Of Food: A Zooarchaeological Analysis Of Huaca Santa Clara And Huaca Gallinazo, North Coast Of Peru, Arwen M. Johns 2017 The University of Western Ontario

The Richness Of Food: A Zooarchaeological Analysis Of Huaca Santa Clara And Huaca Gallinazo, North Coast Of Peru, Arwen M. Johns

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

This thesis is a zooarchaeological study examining the entangled nature of human-animal relations within processes of food production, preparation, and consumption at Huaca Santa Clara and Huaca Gallinazo in the Virú Valley, North Coast of Peru. It assesses how the consumption of animal products influenced social differentiation and identities during early state development in the Early Intermediate Period (200B.C.E – 800 C.E.). This thesis takes a social zooarchaeological approach and utilizes the framework of relational ontology to emphasize the social and symbolic roles of animals. Faunal remains suggest that individuals at Huaca Santa Clara had comparatively equal access ...


Thule Iron Use In The Pre-Contact Arctic, Eileen Colligan 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Thule Iron Use In The Pre-Contact Arctic, Eileen Colligan

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This thesis examines the use of iron by the Thule people, a Neoeskimo culture that lived in the North American Arctic between approximately 1000 AD and 1400 ̶ 1500 AD. The study takes a pan-Arctic perspective to bring together research that has usually been done on a more-limited geographical scale. This viewpoint shows the Thule culture from a view that corresponds to their world.

The study focuses on: (1) revisions in the accepted chronology of the Thule and how these have affected the explanations for the Thule Migration from Alaska to Greenland; (2) new understandings about the iron that was available ...


A Rock The Refuses To Be Forgotten, T. Vincent Herman 2017 Portsmouth Daily Times

A Rock The Refuses To Be Forgotten, T. Vincent Herman

Indian Head Rock Project

An article published by Portsmouth Daily Times describing the screening of Steve Middleton's film documentary on Indian Head Rock at the Scioto County Welcome Center in Portsmouth, Ohio on August 26, 2017.


The Story Of Indian Head Rock - Presentation, Portsmouth Community Action Organization, You Know You Are From Portsmouth Ohio If? Facebook History Group 2017 Morehead State University

The Story Of Indian Head Rock - Presentation, Portsmouth Community Action Organization, You Know You Are From Portsmouth Ohio If? Facebook History Group

Indian Head Rock Project

A presentation given prior to the screening of the documentary film "Between the Rock and the Commonwealth" at Portsmouth, Ohio on August 24, 2017.


The Past In The Present: Federal Implementation Of The Native American Graves Protection And Repatriation Act, Erin J. Hudson 2017 University of New Mexico - Main Campus

The Past In The Present: Federal Implementation Of The Native American Graves Protection And Repatriation Act, Erin J. Hudson

Anthropology ETDs

This dissertation examines the implementation of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act by federal agencies. Specifically, it examines the processes that archaeologists, working in different geographic regions and for different federal agencies, use to complete NAGPRA actions and determine cultural affiliation. A total of nine case studies from two regions (US Southwest and Pacific Northwest) and three federal agencies (USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, and US Army Corps of Engineer) were used to document the complete NAGPRA process as it occurs in real situations, to identify the processes and lines of evidence used to complete those actions ...


The Making Of Seaside’S “Indian Place”: Contested And Enduring Native Spaces On The Nineteenth Century Oregon Coast, Douglas Deur 2017 Portland State University

The Making Of Seaside’S “Indian Place”: Contested And Enduring Native Spaces On The Nineteenth Century Oregon Coast, Douglas Deur

Douglas Deur

During the mid nineteenth century, non-Native settlement and activities disrupted and changed historic Chinook and Clatsop communities at the mouth of the Columbia River. Indian Place in what would be Seaside, Oregon, became home to a number of displaced peoples and an enclave where “the living gathered with the remains of the dead,” for “modest protection from the apocalyptic changes that so radically disrupted tribal lands, lives, and worldviews.” Douglas Deur documents tribal migration to the Indian Place during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and calls attention to many of its significant early residents. Transitional communities such as ...


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