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Ecological System Meets 'Digital Ecosystem': Can Ict Benefit From Understanding Biology?, Robert J. Whelan 2010 University of Wollongong in Dubai

Ecological System Meets 'Digital Ecosystem': Can Ict Benefit From Understanding Biology?, Robert J. Whelan

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

The description of a digital ecosystem as a “loosely coupled, demand-driven, domain clustered, agent-based, self organised, collaborative environment where agents form temporary coalitions for a specific purpose or goal, and each is proactive and responsive for its own benefit” has intriguing similarities with the definition of an ecosystem in ecology. Perhaps the similarities suggest that a deeper understanding of ecology may benefit the further development of ICT, and any differences may therefore represent cautionary tales. In this presentation, I describe characteristics of some ecological systems at several levels-from species to ecosystem-and speculate on the potential of these examples to catalyse ...


An Australian Feeling For Snow Towards Understanding Cultural And Emotional Dimensions Of Climate Change, Andrew W. Gorman-Murray 2010 University of Wollongong

An Australian Feeling For Snow Towards Understanding Cultural And Emotional Dimensions Of Climate Change, Andrew W. Gorman-Murray

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

In Australia, snow is associated with alpine and subalpine regions in rural areas; snow is a component of ‘natural’ rather than urban environments. But the range, depth and duration of Australia’s regional snow cover is imperilled by climate change. While researchers have considered the impacts of snow retreat on the natural environment and responses from the mainland ski industry, this paper explores associated cultural and emotional dimensions of climate change. This responds to calls to account for local meanings of climate, and thus localised perceptions of and responses to climate change. Accordingly, this paper presents a case study of ...


A Golden Garment? Identifying New Ways Of Looking At The Past Through A Preliminary Report Of Textile Fragments From The Pafos ‘Erotes’ Sarcophagus, Adriana Garcia, Diana Wood Conroy 2010 University of Wollongong

A Golden Garment? Identifying New Ways Of Looking At The Past Through A Preliminary Report Of Textile Fragments From The Pafos ‘Erotes’ Sarcophagus, Adriana Garcia, Diana Wood Conroy

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

A golden garment? A preliminary report of textile fragments from the Pafos ‘Erotes’ Sarcophagus Diana Wood Conroy and Adriana Garcia Remnants of very fine gold thread and reddish fibre were found among bone fragments in the ‘pillow’ end of the interior of the Pafos marble sarcophagus in 2001. The placement of the threads suggested a cloth laid over the upper part of the body. The excavator, Dr Eustathios Raptou has described how the sarcophagus had been looted in antiquity, leaving only one jewel and a finial from what must have been rich funerary goods. The textile fragments demonstrated the opulence ...


Modulation Of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing By Synthetic Ceramide Analogues, Hongyun Li, Woojin Scott Kim, Gilles Guillemin, Andrew F. Hill, Genevieve Evin, Brett Garner 2010 Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute

Modulation Of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing By Synthetic Ceramide Analogues, Hongyun Li, Woojin Scott Kim, Gilles Guillemin, Andrew F. Hill, Genevieve Evin, Brett Garner

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Previous studies suggest that membrane lipids may regulate proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to generate amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta). In the present study, we have assessed the capacity for a series of structurally related synthetic ceramide analogues to modulate APP processing in vitro. The compounds tested are established glucosylceramide synthase (GS) inhibitors based on the D-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) structure. PDMP and related compounds PPMP and EtDO-P4 inhibited Abeta secretion from Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human APP (CHO-APP) with approximate IC50 values of 15, 5, and 1 mu M, respectively. A trend for reduced secretion of the APP alpha-secretase ...


Stewardship Among Lifestyle Oriented Rural Landowners, Nicholas J. Gill, Peter Klepeis, Laurie A. Chisholm 2010 University of Wollongong

Stewardship Among Lifestyle Oriented Rural Landowners, Nicholas J. Gill, Peter Klepeis, Laurie A. Chisholm

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Changes in landownership associated with amenity migration are affecting the demographic, cadastral and ecological conditions of rural landscapes. These changes and concerns about their impacts on natural resource management, including ecological conservation, relate to both the structural consequences of landownership change, land subdivision and to the motivations, management ability and attitudes of lifestyle oriented rural landowners. Based on an Australian case study near Sydney, NSW, this paper examines the motivations and practices of such landowners, assesses potential consequences for vegetation and characterises the landowners according to three stewardship types.


Introduction - Doing Rural Cultural Studies, Clifton Evers, Andrew W. Gorman-Murray, Emily Potter 2010 University of Wollongong

Introduction - Doing Rural Cultural Studies, Clifton Evers, Andrew W. Gorman-Murray, Emily Potter

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

In 2008, a themed section of Australian Humanities Review began the task of establishing the emerging field of ‘Rural Cultural Studies’. As the editors pointed out, ‘contemporary cultural studies researchers internationally and in Australia have been massively biased towards urban popular cultures’.


Trace Gas Emissions From Savanna Fires In Northern Australia, Clare Paton-Walsh, Nicholas M. Deutscher, David Griffith, B. W. Forgan, Stephen Wilson, Nicholas Jones, D. Edwards 2010 University of Wollongong

Trace Gas Emissions From Savanna Fires In Northern Australia, Clare Paton-Walsh, Nicholas M. Deutscher, David Griffith, B. W. Forgan, Stephen Wilson, Nicholas Jones, D. Edwards

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

We present analyses of near‐infrared ground‐based Fourier transform infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from a site in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (12.4°S, 130.9°E) from August 2005 to June 2008. Total column amounts of carbon monoxide derived from these spectra show a very clear annual cycle, with evidence of transported pollution from Indonesian fires in 2006. Aerosol optical depth measurements from the same site show a similar annual cycle but without exceptional values in 2006, suggesting significant loss of aerosol loading in the transported and aged smoke. In addition, we report the first ever measurements ...


Distribution Of Thermogenic Activity In Floral Tissues Of Nelumbo Nucifera, Nicole M. Grant, Rebecca E. Miller, Jennifer Watling, Sharon A. Robinson 2010 University of Wollongong

Distribution Of Thermogenic Activity In Floral Tissues Of Nelumbo Nucifera, Nicole M. Grant, Rebecca E. Miller, Jennifer Watling, Sharon A. Robinson

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Thermogenesis in Nelumbo nucifera (Gaertn.) has been known to scientists for many years; however, the extent of heating by different floral parts remains unclear. We present evidence that the receptacle, stamens and petals produce heat independently, and that the source of heating in these tissues is most likely the alternative oxidase (AOX). The temperatures of the receptacle, petals and stamens were significantly higher than non-thermogenic leaf tissue. After removal from the pedicel, the receptacle retained the most heat (8.1 ± 1.9°C above non-thermogenic tissue temperature) and the petals the least (2.8 ± 4.2°C), with the stamens ...


Freezing And Melting Hysteresis Measurements In Solutions Of Hyperactive Antifreeze Protein From An Antarctic Bacteria, Yeliz Celik, Ran Drori, Laurie Graham, Yee-Foong Mok, Peter L. Davies, Ido Braslavsky 2010 Marshall University

Freezing And Melting Hysteresis Measurements In Solutions Of Hyperactive Antifreeze Protein From An Antarctic Bacteria, Yeliz Celik, Ran Drori, Laurie Graham, Yee-Foong Mok, Peter L. Davies, Ido Braslavsky

Physics Faculty Research

Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) evolved in cold-adapted organisms and serve to protect them against freezing in cold conditions by arresting ice crystal growth. Recently, we have shown quantitatively that adsorption of AFPs not only prevents ice from growing but also from melting. This melting inhibition by AFPs, which results in superheated ice (Celik et al, PNAS 2010), is not a well-known phenomenon. Here we present our recent findings in which the Ca2+-dependent hyperactive AFP from Marinomonas primoryensis (MpAFP) clearly displays this property. Additionally, we found that an ice crystal that is initially stabilized and protected by this type of AFP ...


2,3-Bis(Bromomethyl)-1,4-Diphenylbenzene, Jonathan B. Briggs, Mikael D. Jazdzyk, Glen P. Miller 2010 University of New Hampshire

2,3-Bis(Bromomethyl)-1,4-Diphenylbenzene, Jonathan B. Briggs, Mikael D. Jazdzyk, Glen P. Miller

Chemistry Scholarship

In the title compound, C(20)H(16)Br(2), the terminal phenyl groups are twisted away from the central ring by approximately 55 and -125 degrees (average of four dihedral angles each), respectively. The crystal structure is stabilized by a combination of interMolecular and intraMolecular interactions including interMolecular pi-pi stacking interactions [C atoms of closest contact = 3.423 ( 5) angstrom].


Marine Benthic Habitat Mapping Of Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park And Preserve, Alaska With An Evaluation Of The Coastal And Marine Ecological Classification Standard Iii, Luke D. Mitchell, Guy R. Cochrane, Lisa Etherington, Ross D. Powell, Larry A. Mayer 2010 Northern Illinois University

Marine Benthic Habitat Mapping Of Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park And Preserve, Alaska With An Evaluation Of The Coastal And Marine Ecological Classification Standard Iii, Luke D. Mitchell, Guy R. Cochrane, Lisa Etherington, Ross D. Powell, Larry A. Mayer

Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping

Seafloor geology and potential benthic habitats were mapped in Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, using multibeam sonar, ground-truth information, and geological interpretations. Muir Inlet is a recently deglaciated fjord that is under the influence of glacial and paraglacial marine processes. High glacially derived sediment and meltwater fluxes, slope instabilities, and variable bathymetry result in a highly dynamic estuarine environment and benthic ecosystem. We characterize the fjord seafloor and potential benthic habitats using the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) recently developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NatureServe. Substrates within Muir Inlet ...


Blue Carbon: The Role Of Healthy Oceans In Binding Carbon, Christian Nellemann, Emily Corcoran, Carlos M. Duarte, Cassandra De Young, Luciano E. Fonseca, Gabriel Grimsdith 2010 UNEP/GRID-Arendal, Norway

Blue Carbon: The Role Of Healthy Oceans In Binding Carbon, Christian Nellemann, Emily Corcoran, Carlos M. Duarte, Cassandra De Young, Luciano E. Fonseca, Gabriel Grimsdith

Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping

No abstract provided.


Protected Areas And Climate Change In Canada: Challenges And Opportunities For Adaptation, Christopher J. Lemieux, Thomas J. Beechey, Daniel J. Scott, Paul A. Gray 2010 Wilfrid Laurier University

Protected Areas And Climate Change In Canada: Challenges And Opportunities For Adaptation, Christopher J. Lemieux, Thomas J. Beechey, Daniel J. Scott, Paul A. Gray

Geography and Environmental Studies Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Determining Rates Of Virus Production In Aquatic Systems By The Virus Reduction Approach,, M.G. Weinbauer, J.M. Rowe, Steven Wilhelm 2010 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Determining Rates Of Virus Production In Aquatic Systems By The Virus Reduction Approach,, M.G. Weinbauer, J.M. Rowe, Steven Wilhelm

Microbiology Publications and Other Works

The reduction approach to assess virus production and the prokaryotic mortality by viral lysis stops new infection by reducing total virus abundance (and thus virus–host contacts). This allows for easy enumeration of viruses that originate from lysis of already infected cells due to the decreased abundance of free virus particles. This reoccurrence can be quantified and used to assess production and cell lysis rates. Several modifications of the method are presented and compared. The approaches have great potential for elucidating trends in virus production rates as well as for making generalized estimates of the quantitative effects of viruses on ...


Progress Towards The Synthesis Of Type B Polycyclic Polyprenylated Acylphloroglucinol 7-Epi-Clusianone, Pushpa Suresh Jayasekara Mudiyanselage 2010 University of Kentucky

Progress Towards The Synthesis Of Type B Polycyclic Polyprenylated Acylphloroglucinol 7-Epi-Clusianone, Pushpa Suresh Jayasekara Mudiyanselage

University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations

Plants of the family Guttiferae produce polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols (PPAPs), which have interesting biological activities including anticancer and antibacterial properties. The main structural features of PPAPs comprise of bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-2,4,9-triketone with one acyl group together with prenyl, geranyl, or other C10H17 groups. 7-epi-Clusianone, a type B PPAP with C-7 endo stereochemistry, is being approached by establishing the cis relationship with C(4) allyl group and C(2) methyl ester in the early stage of the synthesis. Then C(2) methyl ester is converted to alkyne aldehyde and syn reduction followed ...


Immobilization Of Mercury And Arsenic Through Covalent Thiolate Bonding For The Purpose Of Environmental Remediation, Lisa Y. Blue 2010 University of Kentucky

Immobilization Of Mercury And Arsenic Through Covalent Thiolate Bonding For The Purpose Of Environmental Remediation, Lisa Y. Blue

University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations

Mercury and arsenic are widespread contaminants in aqueous environments throughout the world. The elements arise from multiple sources including mercury from coal-fired power plants and wells placed in natural geological deposits of arseniccontaining minerals. Both elements have significant negative health impacts on humans as they are cumulative toxins that bind to the sulfhydryl groups in proteins, disrupting many biological functions. There are currently no effective, economical techniques for removing either mercury or arsenic from aqueous sources. This thesis will demonstrate a superior removal method for both elements by formation of covalent bonds with the sulfur atoms in N,N’-Bis ...


Soil Water And Crop Growth Processes In A Farmer's Field, Susmitha Surendran Nambuthiri 2010 University of Kentucky

Soil Water And Crop Growth Processes In A Farmer's Field, Susmitha Surendran Nambuthiri

University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations

The study was aimed to provide information on local biomass development during crop growth using ground based optical sensors and to incorporate the local crop status to a crop growth simulation model to improve understanding on inherent variability of crop field. The experiment was conducted in a farmer’s field located near Princeton in Caldwell County, Western Kentucky. Data collection on soil, crop and weather variables was carried out in the farm from 2006 December to 2008 October. During this period corn (Zea mays L.) and winter wheat (Triticum sp) were grown in the field. A 450 m long representative ...


Tunneling Spectroscopy Study Of Calcium Ruthenate, Anthony Bautista 2010 University of Kentucky

Tunneling Spectroscopy Study Of Calcium Ruthenate, Anthony Bautista

University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations

The ruthenates are perhaps one of the most diverse group of materials known up to date. These compounds exhibit a wide array of behaviors ranging from the exotic pwave superconductivity in Sr2RuO4, to the itinerant ferromagnetism in SrRuO3, and the Mott-insulating behavior in Ca2RuO4. One of the most intriguing compounds belonging to this group is Ca3Ru2O7 which is known to undergo an antiferromagnetic ordering at 56K and an insulating transition at 48K. Most intriguing, however, is the behavior displayed by this compound in the presence of an external ...


Stability Of Spore-Based Sensing Systems, Abhishek Sangal 2010 University of Kentucky

Stability Of Spore-Based Sensing Systems, Abhishek Sangal

University of Kentucky Master's Theses

The full exploitation of bacterial whole-cell biosensing systems in field applications requires the survival of bacterial cells and long term-preservation of their sensing ability during transportation and on-site storage of such analytical systems. Specifically, there is a need for rapid, simple and inexpensive biosensing systems for monitoring human health and the environment in remote areas which often suffer from harsh atmospheric conditions and inadequate commercial distribution and storage facilities. Our laboratory has previously reported the successful use of bacterial spores as vehicles for the long-term preservation and storage of whole-cell biosensing systems at room temperature.

In the present research, we ...


Building Sustainable Societies: Exploring Sustainability Policy And Practice In The Age Of High Consumption, Cindy Isenhour 2010 University of Kentucky

Building Sustainable Societies: Exploring Sustainability Policy And Practice In The Age Of High Consumption, Cindy Isenhour

University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation is an attempt to examine how humans in wealthy, post-industrial urban contexts understand sustainability and respond to their concerns given their sphere of influence. I focus specifically on sustainable consumption policy and practice in Sweden, where concerns for sustainability and consumer-based responses are strong. This case raises interesting questions about the relative strength of sustainability movements in different cultural and geo-political contexts as well as the specific factors that have motivated the movement toward sustainable living in Sweden.

The data presented here supports the need for multigenic theories of sustainable consumerism. Rather than relying on dominant theories of ...


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