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3,733 full-text articles. Page 49 of 57.

A Gis To Select Plant Species For Erosion Control Along California Highways, Michael Curto, Brent Hallock, Misty Scharff 2011 California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo

A Gis To Select Plant Species For Erosion Control Along California Highways, Michael Curto, Brent Hallock, Misty Scharff

Brent Hallock

Through road construction and maintenance activities, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) actively manages roadside rights-of-way that transect California's 41 million hectares (101 million acres), spanning over 3,000 meters of elevational change from seashore to subalpine. State and federal highways are grouped into 12 districts, each encompassing from one to 11 of the state's 58 counties. District personnel are typically responsible for implementing site-specific adaptations of general statewide guidelines for shortto long-term erosion control following construction or storm damage. Many erosion control projects involve reestablishing vegetation through seeding where the precarious life stages of germination and establishment ...


Native Vegetation In Western Australia Is Actively Involved With Soil Formation, Doug Sawkins, William H. Verboom, John S. Pate 2011 University of Western Australia

Native Vegetation In Western Australia Is Actively Involved With Soil Formation, Doug Sawkins, William H. Verboom, John S. Pate

Bulletins

Many adverse situations in Western Australian agriculture have arisen because in the past we cleared native perennial vegetation below safe ecological limits in order to grow annual crops and pasture. In retrospect, we did not fully understand the functioning of the native ecosystems concerned and thus did not foresee the long-term consequences. Research into the survival techniques of native species provides important lessons for future farming. By understanding the behaviour of plants and soils we can maximise their use in a sustainable way. Knowledge of the water acquisition and storage strategies of native plants in seasonally dry areas may be ...


Wheat Yield Potential And Land Management Constraints In The South West Of Western Australia, Dennis van Gool 2011 Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

Wheat Yield Potential And Land Management Constraints In The South West Of Western Australia, Dennis Van Gool

Resource management technical reports

This report provides the underpinning information to help improve the long term profitability of wheat cropping. It documents the realistic potential yield of the 18 million hectares of agricultural land in the South West of Western Australia and the gap between this potential and the actual yields, based on shire averages. This report also summarises major land management constraints that limit the yield potential. This information can be used to aid strategic planning at different levels, for example state, shire and, with care, as a starting point for farm planning.


Using Equal‐Area Quadratic Splines To Compute Depth‐ Weighted Averages Of Soil Chemical Parameters, Chris E. Johnson, Jeremy Tamargo 2011 Syracuse University

Using Equal‐Area Quadratic Splines To Compute Depth‐ Weighted Averages Of Soil Chemical Parameters, Chris E. Johnson, Jeremy Tamargo

Civil and Environmental Engineering

No abstract provided.


Hydrological Impacts Of Integrated Oil Mallee Farming Systems, D L. Bennett, John Andrew Simons, Russell Speed 2011 Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

Hydrological Impacts Of Integrated Oil Mallee Farming Systems, D L. Bennett, John Andrew Simons, Russell Speed

Resource management technical reports

This study reports on the results from investigations at four sites into the effect of commercial-scale oil mallee systems on localised groundwater systems over seven years. It also reports the results of the use of a numerical model to forecast potential longer term impacts.


Using Equal‐Area Quadratic Splines To Compute Depth‐ Weighted Averages Of Soil Chemical Parameters, Chris E. Johnson, Jeremy Tamargo 2011 Syracuse University

Using Equal‐Area Quadratic Splines To Compute Depth‐ Weighted Averages Of Soil Chemical Parameters, Chris E. Johnson, Jeremy Tamargo

Chris E Johnson

No abstract provided.


Cal Poly's Eswcc Teaches The Next Generation Of Soil Scientists, M. Perry, C. Appel 2011 California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo

Cal Poly's Eswcc Teaches The Next Generation Of Soil Scientists, M. Perry, C. Appel

Chip Appel

Since 1992, members of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s Earth, Soil, and Water Conservation Club (ESWCC), sponsored by the MESA Agricultural Initiative, have volunteered their time and expertise to educate middle-school students in soil science. ESWCC members assemble soil testing kits containing three soils, pH testing materials, and instructions for analyzing soil pore space, water infiltration rates, and soil texture by “feel”. The kits help over 200 California teachers convey the importance of soil science through simple physical and chemical procedures that provide a deeper understanding of soil. ESWCC members train teachers to run classroom experiments and to relate ...


Photo Highlights Of The 31st Kentucky Alfalfa Conference, Kentucky Alfalfa Conference 2011 University of Kentucky

Photo Highlights Of The 31st Kentucky Alfalfa Conference, Kentucky Alfalfa Conference

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

No abstract provided.


What's New In Forage Equipment?, Dan Undersander 2011 University of Wisconsin

What's New In Forage Equipment?, Dan Undersander

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

The forage equipment industry is changing in response to farmers’ needs. These changes consist of innovations to increase capacity, to improve the usability of the machine, and to improve the quality of the product. Most changes are occurring with existing equipment, but some totally new product innovations are occurring.


Dollars & Cents Of Alfalfa Production, Kenneth H. Burdine 2011 University of Kentucky

Dollars & Cents Of Alfalfa Production, Kenneth H. Burdine

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

The last several years have been incredibly challenging for all of Kentucky agriculture and hay producers have been no exception to the rule. Statewide, alfalfa yields have been below average in 3 of the last 4 years due to challenging weather in 2007, 2008, and again in 2010. In addition to the weather challenges, producers are also dealing with higher costs of fuel, fertilizer, and machinery. These challenges make budgeting especially important looking ahead to the 2011 growing season.


Alfalfa Hay For Horses: Myths Vs. Reality, Laurie Lawrence 2011 University of Kentucky

Alfalfa Hay For Horses: Myths Vs. Reality, Laurie Lawrence

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Does it really matter if hay has some mold in it?

Hay that is high in dust or mold can irritate the horse’s respiratory tract. Optimum athletic performance depends on a healthy respiratory tract, therefore dusty/moldy hay should never be fed to horses used (or intended for) athletic events. A chronic respiratory disease commonly called “heaves” can be aggravated by moldy and dusty hay. Horses with heaves can have so much difficulty breathing that even mild exercise is impossible. In addition, moldy hay may contain toxins that could affect the horse if they are ingested.

Horse owners should ...


Hay Drying, Preservatives, Conditioning, Ash Content, Dan Undersander 2011 University of Wisconsin

Hay Drying, Preservatives, Conditioning, Ash Content, Dan Undersander

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Drying forage for hay has always been a challenge. While we cannot control the weather we can manage cut forage to maximize drying. The purpose of this paper is to give a few principles of hay and silage making and discuss machinery available relative to these principles. Then we will also talk about minimizing ash in hay to optimize the total digestible nutrients of the forage.


Making Your Fertilizer Dollar Go Further, Greg Schwab 2011 University of Kentucky

Making Your Fertilizer Dollar Go Further, Greg Schwab

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Alfalfa is a high quality, valuable forage crop that can be successfully produced on most well drained soils in Kentucky, for hay and silage, and for grazing. Fertilizing alfalfa can be uniquely challenging because it is a perennial crop. In addition, high-yielding alfalfa removes a tremendous amount of soil nutrients when compared to other crops grown in Kentucky. A thorough understanding of alfalfa’s growth habits, nutrient requirements, and the soil nutrient supply mechanisms for alfalfa is necessary to effectively manage fertilizer inputs and maximize profitability while minimizing the environmental impact.


Keys To Getting A Good Stand Of Alfalfa, Garry D. Lacefield 2011 University of Kentucky

Keys To Getting A Good Stand Of Alfalfa, Garry D. Lacefield

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Profitable alfalfa production requires high yields of high quality forage, a long stand life and skillful marketing of the end product. This requires attention to details, timely action and advanced planning. There are four basic prerequisites for a successful alfalfa program: establishment, production, harvesting and marketing with a very specific goal within each component.


Alfalfa Varieties For Today And Tomorrow, S. Ray Smith 2011 University of Kentucky

Alfalfa Varieties For Today And Tomorrow, S. Ray Smith

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

There are a number of new alfalfa varieties that have come on the market in the last few years. In fact, it can be hard keeping up with all the developments. In the following pages I will overview most of the important traits that can be found in new varieties. These include Roundup Ready®, potato leafhopper resistance, hybrids, lodging resistance, rapid regrowth, higher quality, resistance to new diseases, and more… Many times I am asked “Are new varieties really worth the cost?” The best way to answer that question is to consider work by Dr. Jimmy Henning where he summarized ...


Foreword And Recipients Of Kentucky Alfalfa Awards [2011], Garry D. Lacefield, Christi L. Forsythe 2011 University of Kentucky

Foreword And Recipients Of Kentucky Alfalfa Awards [2011], Garry D. Lacefield, Christi L. Forsythe

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

No abstract provided.


Heats Of K/Ca And K/Pb Exchange In Two Tropical Soils As Measured By Flow Calorimetry, Chip Appel, Dean Rhue, Lena Ma, Bill Reve 2011 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Heats Of K/Ca And K/Pb Exchange In Two Tropical Soils As Measured By Flow Calorimetry, Chip Appel, Dean Rhue, Lena Ma, Bill Reve

Chip Appel

Flow calorimetry can provide useful information about surface chemical reactions in soils that cannot be obtained readily by other methods. When flow calorimetry is conducted over a range of surface coverages, different sorption heats can be calculated to yield information about how binding energies vary with coverage, i.e., surface heterogeneity. The purpose of this study was to determine heats of exchange for K/Ca and K/Pb systems using flow calorimetry and to evaluate the degree of surface heterogeneity with respect to cation exchange. Surface horizon samples from a Typic Acrorthox and Typic Tropohumult from Puerto Rico were used ...


Greener Pastures 3 - Managing Phosphorus In Dairy Pastures, Mike Bolland, Ian Guthridge, Bill Russell, Martin Staines, John Lucey, Richard Morris 2011 Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

Greener Pastures 3 - Managing Phosphorus In Dairy Pastures, Mike Bolland, Ian Guthridge, Bill Russell, Martin Staines, John Lucey, Richard Morris

Bulletins

Between 1999 and 2009, soil testing was conducted in 48 dairy paddocks at Vasse Research Centre (VRC) in the south-west of Western Australia (WA). This study will be referred to as the VRC soil test study.

Phosphorus experiments were undertaken on partner farms of the Greener Pastures project to improve our knowledge of the phosphorus requirements of intensively grazed ryegrass pastures. These are the partner farm phosphorus experiments.


Greener Pastures 4 - Managing Potassium In Dairy Pastures, Mike Bolland, Ian Guthridge, Bill Russell, Martin Staines, John Lucey, Richard Morris 2011 Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

Greener Pastures 4 - Managing Potassium In Dairy Pastures, Mike Bolland, Ian Guthridge, Bill Russell, Martin Staines, John Lucey, Richard Morris

Bulletins

We undertook three studies into the potassium requirements of high rainfall pastures: 1. Between 1999 and 2009, soil testing was conducted in 48 dairy paddocks at Vasse Research Centre (VRC) in the south-west of Western Australia (WA). This study will be referred to as the VRC soil test study.

2. Between 2002 and 2007, a potassium experiment was undertaken at Boyanup to improve our knowledge of potassium requirements of intensively grazed ryegrass pastures. This will be referred to as the Boyanup potassium experiment.

3. Between 2006 and 2010, potassium experiments were undertaken on two partner farms of the Greener Pastures ...


Greener Pastures 6 - Managing Soil Acidity In Dairy Pastures, Mike Bolland, Bill Russell, Martin Staines, Richard Morris, John Lucey, D L. Bennett 2011 Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

Greener Pastures 6 - Managing Soil Acidity In Dairy Pastures, Mike Bolland, Bill Russell, Martin Staines, Richard Morris, John Lucey, D L. Bennett

Bulletins

During 1999-2009, soil testing for pH (in CaCl2) was used to determine lime application for 48 paddocks at the Vasse Research Centre at Busselton, in the south-west of Western Australia (WA).

Paddocks had been grazed intensively by dairy cows and their young stock over a period of 10 years, as part of the Vasse Milk Farmlets and Greener Pastures farming system projects. Pasture consisted of annual ryegrasses with some subterranean clover. Soils in the 48 paddocks were 1-2 m sand to sandy loam over massive clay, known locally as Abba sand.

For many soils in the region, including Abba sands ...


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