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Injury-Related Infant Deaths: A State Analysis Of A Public Health, Health Care, Policy Network, Sharla Smith, Xi Zhu, Mary Aitken 2016 University of Kansas Medical Center

Injury-Related Infant Deaths: A State Analysis Of A Public Health, Health Care, Policy Network, Sharla Smith, Xi Zhu, Mary Aitken

Frontiers in Public Health Services and Systems Research

Introduction: This research examines a state-level public health, health care, and policy network focused on efforts to reduce unintentional childhood injuries. The network is composed of 12 organizations: four public health, four health care, and four policy.

Methods: A 23-item survey was administered to the 12 organizations between January and June 2015. Analyses were conducted using HyperResearch and UCInet 6.

Results: More organizations worked together on assessment and planning efforts that identify and quantify the nature of at-risk infants in the community and strategies for reducing injury-related infant deaths. The Injury Prevention Center, the most central organization, interacted most frequently ...


Discovery And Development Of Human Monoclonal Antibodies To Block Rhd Alloimmunization During Pregnancy, Tushar Gupta, Melissa Gawron, Colby A. Souders, Michael A. Brehm, Dale Greiner, Leonard D. Shultz, Smita Jaiswal, Sean McCauley, Ann Dauphin, Jeremy Luban, Lisa Cavacini 2016 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Discovery And Development Of Human Monoclonal Antibodies To Block Rhd Alloimmunization During Pregnancy, Tushar Gupta, Melissa Gawron, Colby A. Souders, Michael A. Brehm, Dale Greiner, Leonard D. Shultz, Smita Jaiswal, Sean Mccauley, Ann Dauphin, Jeremy Luban, Lisa Cavacini

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

Exposure of an Rh negative mother to red blood cells (RBCs) of an Rh positive fetus results in alloimmunization and development of anti-RhD antibodies. The anti-RhD antibodies cause hemolytic disease of the new born babies during subsequent pregnancies. Current prophylactic treatment involves polyclonal anti-RhD IgG purified from plasma of humans and is administered in approximately 20% of pregnancies. While the current prophylaxis is effective, it involves the use of human plasma and non-RhD specific antibodies, thus posing a risk of transmitting infections and undesired antibody reactions. Moreover, there is a serious scarcity of plasma donors to meet the requirement of ...


Predisposed Health Conditions Of Children Exposed To Methamphetamine In Utero, Seth Peters 2016 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Predisposed Health Conditions Of Children Exposed To Methamphetamine In Utero, Seth Peters

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

Methamphetamine (MA) use and abuse is a growing problem worldwide [United Nations World Drug Report]. It is common knowledge that MA use affects not only the user, but also friends, family, and the communities close to them [NIDA]. One area of impact that is lacking sufficient study is the effects of MA use by expectant mothers on her child later in life. That is to say, a child who was exposed to MA in utero may be more likely than an unexposed fetus to have predispositions to a variety of health conditions. After an extensive PubMed database search, it is ...


Can Physician Champions Improve Kangaroo Care? Trends Over 5 Years In Rural Western India, Apurv Soni, Amee Amin, Dipen V. Patel, Nisha Fahey, Ajay G. Phatak, Jeroan Allison, Somashekhar M. Nimbalkar 2016 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Can Physician Champions Improve Kangaroo Care? Trends Over 5 Years In Rural Western India, Apurv Soni, Amee Amin, Dipen V. Patel, Nisha Fahey, Ajay G. Phatak, Jeroan Allison, Somashekhar M. Nimbalkar

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

Introduction: In 2013, approximately 2.8 million children worldwide died within the neonatal period. India is at the epicenter of this tragedy, accounting for one-third of all neonatal mortalities. Prematurity and/or with low birth weight are the leading cause of neonatal mortality and India has the highest number of neonates born preterm and weighing less than 2,500 grams worldwide. It is estimated that Kangaroo Care can avert up to 48% of all neonatal deaths among premature babies by 2025. However, the promise of Kangaroo Care as a low-cost, safe, and efficacious intervention to reduce neonatal mortality in India ...


A Pilot Study To Assess The Feasibility, Safety And Acceptability Of Soy-Based Diet For Pregnant Women At High Risk For Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Ling Shi, Vidya Iyer, Emily Jones, Tiffany A. Moore Simas, Alice H. Lichtenstein, Laura L. Hayman 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

A Pilot Study To Assess The Feasibility, Safety And Acceptability Of Soy-Based Diet For Pregnant Women At High Risk For Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Ling Shi, Vidya Iyer, Emily Jones, Tiffany A. Moore Simas, Alice H. Lichtenstein, Laura L. Hayman

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

Background: Diet plays an important role in the prevention and management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Previous studies suggest that soy protein and isoflavones may have beneficial effects on lipid and glucose metabolism. Little is known regarding the cardiometabolic effects of soy intake during pregnancy. This pilot study assessed the feasibility, safety and acceptability of daily consumption of soy foods during pregnancy in women at high risk for GDM, and participant adherence to their assigned treatment.

Methods: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted among pregnant women at high risk for GDM. The Soy group were counseled to consume a ...


Association Between First Trimester Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein–A And The Development Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Aylin Sert, Katherine Leung, Molly E. Waring, Raziel Rojas-Rodriguez, Silvia Corvera, Tiffany A. Moore Simas 2016 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Association Between First Trimester Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein–A And The Development Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Aylin Sert, Katherine Leung, Molly E. Waring, Raziel Rojas-Rodriguez, Silvia Corvera, Tiffany A. Moore Simas

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

Background: Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a common pregnancy complication with significant cardiometabolic consequences for mothers and offspring. Previous research from our group suggests that adipose tissue IGFBP-5 and its unique metalloprotease PAPP-A (Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A) may play mechanistic roles in GDM development by regulating functional IGF-1 levels and lipid storage and metabolism.

Aim: To examine the relationship between circulating PAPP-A levels and GDM development. We hypothesized that high first trimester PAPP-A levels would be associated with decreased GDM risk.

Methods: A retrospective cohort of women delivering singleton gestations at UMass Memorial Healthcare (2009, 2010, 2014, 2015) was assembled by ...


Beyond The Three Delays: A Case Study Of Haiti's Maternal Health Sector, Stephanie Rapp 2016 SIT Graduation Institute

Beyond The Three Delays: A Case Study Of Haiti's Maternal Health Sector, Stephanie Rapp

Capstone Collection

This research seeks to understand how the maternal health sector in Haiti can be understood and perhaps improved through the framework of the Three Delays, developed by Thaddeus and Maine (1994). These delays are (1) the delay in the decision to seek care, (2) the delay in reaching a health facility, and (3) the delay in receiving adequate care at a health facility. The findings of this capstone strongly demonstrated that global health practitioners in Haiti often opt for technical solutions, but in fact there are numerous shadow delays preventing these solutions from taking hold and ameliorating maternal mortality. Tensions ...


Use Of Mobile Phones For Infant And Young Child Feeding Counseling In Sri Lankan Tea Estates: A Formative Study, Manuj C. Weerasinghe, Upul Senerath, Sanjeeva Godakandage, Hiranya Jayawickrama, Aravinda Wickramasinghe, Indika Siriwardena, Srisothinathan Nimalan, Michael J. Dibley, Ashraful Alam 2016 Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka

Use Of Mobile Phones For Infant And Young Child Feeding Counseling In Sri Lankan Tea Estates: A Formative Study, Manuj C. Weerasinghe, Upul Senerath, Sanjeeva Godakandage, Hiranya Jayawickrama, Aravinda Wickramasinghe, Indika Siriwardena, Srisothinathan Nimalan, Michael J. Dibley, Ashraful Alam

The Qualitative Report

Despite the availability of free health services, children residing in Sri Lanka’s less developed plantation sector are more likely to be undernourished than children in urban and rural sectors. Hence, we need new approaches to improve their nutritional status. One promising approach involves mobile health initiatives, which is used effectively in other countries in primary health care settings. We studied the nature of mobile phone use in this community, and their perceptions on using m-health counseling for infant and young child feeding. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were the study methods. We found that mobile phone usage is ...


Maternal, Environmental, And Social Context Predicts Diarrheal Infection Incidence In Young Children In Sundarbans, India, Sohini Mukherjee, Laura M. Glynn 2016 Chapman University

Maternal, Environmental, And Social Context Predicts Diarrheal Infection Incidence In Young Children In Sundarbans, India, Sohini Mukherjee, Laura M. Glynn

Student Research Day Abstracts and Posters

Diarrheal infection is the third leading cause of childhood mortality in India and is responsible for 13% of all deaths per year in children under 5 years of age (Lakshaminarayan & Jayalakshmy, 2015). The Sundarbans in West Bengal is amongst the poorest regions of India and is the epitome of abject deprivation and the acute struggle against geographical and socioeconomic challenges. The incidence of diarrhea in this region is considerably high; about 42,000 reported cases occur per month, and one in five diarrhea cases are reported as severe (with blood in stool). In addition, 37% of children hospitalized for ailments were admitted due to diarrhea (Kanjilal et al., 2013). However, little research has been conducted to determine whether maternal characteristics and behaviours correlate with this incidence in India, though some studies have found certain family characteristics to be protective in ...


Psychological And Sociocultural Influences Of Current And Historical Intimate Partner Violence In Pregnancy, Cindy D. Phillips 2016 East Tennessee State Universtiy

Psychological And Sociocultural Influences Of Current And Historical Intimate Partner Violence In Pregnancy, Cindy D. Phillips

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1.5 million women are victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) each year, and 324,000 of these women are pregnant (2013). Research on the predictability of certain factors and their relationship to current and historical IPV is limited. In order to better understand IPV as it related to a sample of 1,016 Appalachian pregnant women selected for the Tennessee Interventions for Pregnant Smokers (TIPS), it was important to evaluate various influences that may predict the prevalence of IPV in this population when compared to the State of Tennessee ...


Breastfeeding Initiation Among Women Who Have Experience With Incarceration, Natalie R. Libster 2016 College of William and Mary

Breastfeeding Initiation Among Women Who Have Experience With Incarceration, Natalie R. Libster

College of William & Mary Undergraduate Honors Theses

The psychological effects of breastfeeding may be especially beneficial to incarcerated mothers, who are an at-risk population. The current study examines factors impacting breastfeeding initiation among a sample of women who have experience with incarceration. In the first study, 117 incarcerated pregnant women participated in the William and Mary Healthy Beginnings Project, a research and intervention program that works with local correctional facilities to improve the birth outcomes of pregnant inmates. Results reveal that factors associated with incarceration, such as delivering in jail, longer duration of incarceration during pregnancy, and being shackled during delivery, significantly impacted decisions not to initiate ...


Medication Use While Breastfeeding With Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Literature Review, Brittany Edralin 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Medication Use While Breastfeeding With Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Literature Review, Brittany Edralin

University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


Breastfeeding Rates In Marshallese Mothers; A Needs Assessment, Olivia N. Pennington 2016 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Breastfeeding Rates In Marshallese Mothers; A Needs Assessment, Olivia N. Pennington

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

ABSTRACT

Background. Multiple health disparities are associated with the Marshallese population in Northwest Arkansas. Childhood obesity, linked to a decrease in exclusive breastfeeding, is one of the predominant issues. Since their migration to the United States, exclusive breastfeeding rates of Marshallese mothers have steadily declined throughout the years. Little research has been conducted to help combat this growing health disparity. Due to the increased growth in this population in Northwest Arkansas, it is imperative that measures are taken to decrease these disparities to improve the overall health of the future generations.

Objective: To determine the relationship between maternal age, parity ...


The Influence Of Socioeconomic Status And Ethnicity On Body Mass Index In Children In Northwest Arkansas, Madison E. Davidson 2016 University of Arkansas

The Influence Of Socioeconomic Status And Ethnicity On Body Mass Index In Children In Northwest Arkansas, Madison E. Davidson

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure of body fat that is calculated based on the height, weight, age, and gender of a child. Body Mass Index (BMI) is an important indicator of potential health risks in children. Determining correlations between ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and BMI may assist in identifying children at risk for comorbidities associated with either an elevated or low BMI. An elevated BMI may lead to complications later in life such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, type 2 diabetes, obesity in adulthood, and psychosocial issues (Geason & Dodd, 2009). On the other hand, a low BMI could lead to decreased ...


Effects Of An Educational Intervention On Exclusive Breastfeeding Rates In Marshallese Mothers Residing In The U.S., Bentley S. Snider 2016 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Effects Of An Educational Intervention On Exclusive Breastfeeding Rates In Marshallese Mothers Residing In The U.S., Bentley S. Snider

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

Abstract

Background: The Marshallese are one of the fastest growing migrant populations in the U.S. They have considerable health disparities despite their increasing access to health care. The Marshallese women in this population prefer to breastfeed, but have encountered many cultural barriers that have deterred them from exclusively breastfeeding for a significant amount of time. Breastfeeding is linked to many protective benefits for children’s health, such as decreasing the likelihood of obesity, even into the adult years.

Objective: The purpose was to evaluate the impact on breastfeeding rates through implementation of a culturally significant educational intervention for the ...


Doulas Could Improve Foreign-Born Women’S Perinatal And Postpartum Satisfaction And Increase Health Providers’ Cultural Competency In A Multicultural Urban Area Of The United States., Crystal Kazik 2016 Clark University

Doulas Could Improve Foreign-Born Women’S Perinatal And Postpartum Satisfaction And Increase Health Providers’ Cultural Competency In A Multicultural Urban Area Of The United States., Crystal Kazik

International Development, Community and Environment (IDCE)

Doulas act as a cultural bridge between clients and providers through the support, advocacy, and education they provide. Unfortunately, migrant women may be at a disadvantage for accessing and benefiting from their services due to a variety of socioeconomic and cultural factors including predisposed ideas of care and structure based on experiences in native countries, language barriers, lower health literacy, and a lack of awareness and understanding from hospital/clinic staff.

A strategic multifaceted approach utilizing doulas, such as Boston Medical Center’s collaborative and culturally competent model, may greatly improve foreign-born women’s experience and satisfaction with healthcare when ...


To Screen Or Not To Screen Parent’S Perceptions Of Eye Care Prevention For Pre-School Age Children, Bonnie E. Keaton 2016 The University of Southern Mississippi

To Screen Or Not To Screen Parent’S Perceptions Of Eye Care Prevention For Pre-School Age Children, Bonnie E. Keaton

Honors Theses

One in 20 children is at risk for permanent vision loss from disorders such as amblyopia and strabismus (Why Save Sight, 2016). Despite vision disorders and childhood blindness being a common disability in children, preventative vision screenings are not at the center of prevention discussions. Studies have suggested that vision screenings for young children are beneficial in preventing permanent vision loss (Vision Screenings for Healthy Vision, 2016). Vision screenings for preschool children are important and require more attention in the United States. This descriptive study addressed parental perceptions of early detection of vision problems among preschoolers in southeast Mississippi as ...


Association Between First Trimester Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein–A (Papp-A) And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Development, Aylin Sert, Katherine Leung, Molly E. Waring, Raziel Rojas-Rodriguez, Silvia Corvera, Tiffany A. Moore Simas 2016 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Association Between First Trimester Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein–A (Papp-A) And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Development, Aylin Sert, Katherine Leung, Molly E. Waring, Raziel Rojas-Rodriguez, Silvia Corvera, Tiffany A. Moore Simas

Senior Scholars Program

Background: Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a common pregnancy complication with significant cardiometabolic consequences for mothers and offspring. Previous research from our group suggests that adipose tissue IGFBP-5 and its unique metalloprotease PAPP-A (Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A) may play mechanistic roles in GDM development by regulating functional IGF-1 levels and lipid storage and metabolism.

Aim: To examine the relationship between circulating PAPP-A levels and GDM development. We hypothesized that high first trimester PAPP-A levels would be associated with decreased GDM risk.

Methods: A retrospective cohort of women delivering singleton gestations at UMass Memorial Healthcare (2009, 2010, 2014 ...


Breastfeeding Education For Fathers: An Intervention To Increase Breastfeeding Rates, Jill Marie Frisz 2016 Valparaiso University

Breastfeeding Education For Fathers: An Intervention To Increase Breastfeeding Rates, Jill Marie Frisz

Evidence-Based Practice Project Reports

If every infant were breastfed within an hour of birth, exclusively breastfed until six months, and given breastmilk up to two years, almost 800,000 lives would be saved annually (who, 2014). Nationally, breastfeeding rates drop significantly from three to six months. A search of literature yielded significant evidence as fathers for facilitators to increase breastfeeding rates. The purpose of this evidence based practice (EBP) project was to determine the effects of best practice measures to educate fathers about breastfeeding to increase anytime breastfeeding rates. The social support theory and ACE Star model guided the literature search and implementation of ...


The Presence Of Stem Cells In Human Breast Milk And Research Implications, Melody (Brooke) Peterson 2016 Liberty University

The Presence Of Stem Cells In Human Breast Milk And Research Implications, Melody (Brooke) Peterson

Senior Honors Theses

Stem cell therapy research is an expanding area of study as stem cell therapy is believed to have the potential to provide treatment options for numerous disease processes. Currently, embryonic stem cell research is the method of choice to evaluate the potential for stem cell therapy. The use of human embryos for stem cell research raises moral and ethical controversies. Stem cells are found in a variety of mediums, but until the recent discovery of stem cells in human breast milk, the most versatile stem cells have been those found in the human embryo. Human breast milk stem cells could ...


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