Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

International Public Health Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

322 Full-Text Articles 661 Authors 78,859 Downloads 60 Institutions

All Articles in International Public Health

Faceted Search

322 full-text articles. Page 1 of 11.

Occupational Health Risk Factors For Schistosomiasis: Systematic Review And Analysis, Sarah Grace Sawyer, Amira Roess, Gisela Butera 2015 George Washington University

Occupational Health Risk Factors For Schistosomiasis: Systematic Review And Analysis, Sarah Grace Sawyer, Amira Roess, Gisela Butera

GW Research Days 2015

Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by a parasitic flatworm which afflicts over 200 million people in the poorest regions of Africa. Carried by snails living in fresh, stagnant water, the parasite penetrates human skin upon contact, causing the victim to suffer a range of symptoms including diarrhea, blood in the urine, and eventual death. Despite its prevalence, schistosomiasis is preventable, treatable, and curable once a control program is implemented. Substantial reduction of schistosomiasis would relieve suffering and produce many socio-economic benefits, including higher productivity and higher school attendance rates. Disease transmission is directly tied to the environment, and ...


The Challenges Of Conducting International Public Health Research: Data Collection Lessons From The Field, Caroline Kuo 2015 Brown University

The Challenges Of Conducting International Public Health Research: Data Collection Lessons From The Field, Caroline Kuo

University of Massachusetts and New England Area Librarian e-Science Symposium

Caroline Kuo, DPhil, MPhil, is Assistant Professor, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University. She spoke about the data collection and data management challenges encountered in her research.


Journal Of Global Radiology, Volume 1 Issue 1 (March 2015), 2015 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Journal Of Global Radiology, Volume 1 Issue 1 (March 2015)

The Journal of Global Radiology

Full issue of Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2015) of the Journal of Global Radiology. Articles are available individually at http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/jgr/vol1/iss1/.


The Role Of Zinc And Iron-Folic Acid Supplementation On Early Child Temperament And Eating Behaviors In Rural Nepal: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Pamela J. Surkan, Mary Katherine Charles, Joanne Katz, Emily H. Siegel, Subarna K. Khatry, Steven C. LeClerq, Rebecca J. Stoltzfus, James M. Tielsch 2015 George Washington University

The Role Of Zinc And Iron-Folic Acid Supplementation On Early Child Temperament And Eating Behaviors In Rural Nepal: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Pamela J. Surkan, Mary Katherine Charles, Joanne Katz, Emily H. Siegel, Subarna K. Khatry, Steven C. Leclerq, Rebecca J. Stoltzfus, James M. Tielsch

Global Health Faculty Publications

Child eating behaviors play an important role in nutrient intake, ultimately affecting child growth and later outcomes in adulthood. The study assessed the effects of iron-folic acid and zinc supplementation on child temperament and child eating behaviors in rural Nepal. Children (N = 569) aged 4–17 months in Sarlahi district, southern Nepal were randomized to receive daily supplements of placebo, iron-folic acid, zinc, or zinc plus iron-folic acid and followed for approximately 1 year. At baseline and four follow-up visits mothers completed questionnaires including information on demographic characteristics and child temperament and eating behaviors. The main effects of zinc and ...


Imaging In The Land Of 1000 Hills: Rwanda Radiology Country Report, David A. Rosman, Jean Jacques Nshizirungu, Emmanuel Rudakemwa, Crispin Moshi, Jean de Dieu Tuyisenge, Etienne Uwimana, Louise Kalisa 2015 Harvard Medical School

Imaging In The Land Of 1000 Hills: Rwanda Radiology Country Report, David A. Rosman, Jean Jacques Nshizirungu, Emmanuel Rudakemwa, Crispin Moshi, Jean De Dieu Tuyisenge, Etienne Uwimana, Louise Kalisa

The Journal of Global Radiology

Rwanda is an equatorial country in central Africa (Figure 1), and part of the East African Community of Burundi, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. It is a small country, just over 10,000 square miles. Its population of nearly 12,000,000 makes it the most densely populated state in continental Africa. Rwanda’s capital, Kigali, is a mile-high city. Its elevation makes the climate much cooler and more comfortable than a typical equatorial climate. The average annual temperature is 20.5 degrees Celsius with a narrow range – April, the coldest month has an average temperature of 20 degrees, whereas August ...


Melding Data Collection Methodology With Community Assistance: Benefits To Both Researchers And The Indigenous Groups They Study, Douglas S. London 2015 Adelphi University

Melding Data Collection Methodology With Community Assistance: Benefits To Both Researchers And The Indigenous Groups They Study, Douglas S. London

Journal of Ecological Anthropology

I present a description of a model of melding data collection with community aid in the form of health educator training that emerged in the process of research collaboration during 2009-2011 with the Kawymeno Waorani foragers of Amazonian Ecuador. Some guidelines are suggested as to how benefits to both parties might be achieved when collecting data with indigenous populations. In this article I describe some of the advantages and pitfalls of melding data collection and community aid with research when collaborating with vulnerable indigenous groups.


Welcome To The Journal Of Global Radiology, Sarwat Hussain 2015 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Welcome To The Journal Of Global Radiology, Sarwat Hussain

The Journal of Global Radiology

‘Global radiology’ is a new concept – a subspecialty of radiology that includes much more than diagnosticians and interventionists. It consists of an international community of individuals, groups and organizations working to improve access to and quality of medical imaging around the globe, and address universal shortages of equipment, infrastructure, trained personnel, education, and research opportunities in underdeveloped countries. Currently, articles on global radiology are scattered throughout various radiology journals. The Journal of Global Radiology (JGR), an open-access, peer-reviewed journal, seeks to counteract this fragmentation of information by publishing content pertaining exclusively to improving access to medical imaging on an international ...


Book Review: Radiology In Global Health, Yogesh Jha, Ali M. Tahvildari 2015 Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders

Book Review: Radiology In Global Health, Yogesh Jha, Ali M. Tahvildari

The Journal of Global Radiology

This book review examines Mollura and Lungren’s (eds.) Radiology in Global Health: Strategies, Implementation, and Applications (2014). The contributors have attempted to investigate root causes for radiological service-related disparity that exists between prosperous economies and low- and middle-income countries. The book is clearly geared towards manufacturing consent among stakeholders through research-based evidence to amplify the role of radiology in global healthcare through initiation, implementation, amelioration, and developing sustainable solutions for rollout of essential diagnostic/therapeutic radiology services at population levels. This includes reducing access gaps for radiology/imaging services within industrialized countries as well.


Implementing Diagnostic Imaging Services In A Rural Setting Of Extreme Poverty: Five Years Of X-Ray And Ultrasound Service Delivery In Achham, Nepal, Malina Filkins, Scott Halliday, Brock Daniels, Roshan Bista, Sudan Thapa, Ryan Schwarz, Dan Schwarz, Bikash Gauchan, Duncan Maru 2015 Partners HealthCare System

Implementing Diagnostic Imaging Services In A Rural Setting Of Extreme Poverty: Five Years Of X-Ray And Ultrasound Service Delivery In Achham, Nepal, Malina Filkins, Scott Halliday, Brock Daniels, Roshan Bista, Sudan Thapa, Ryan Schwarz, Dan Schwarz, Bikash Gauchan, Duncan Maru

The Journal of Global Radiology

Introduction: Diagnostic radiology services are severely lacking in many rural settings and the implementation of these services poses complex challenges. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of diagnostic radiology services at a district-level hospital in Achham, a rural district in Nepal.

Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of the implementation of diagnostic radiology services. We compiled a list of implementation challenges and proposed solutions based on an internal review of historical data, hospital records, and the experiences of hospital staff members. We used a seven-domain analytic framework to structure our discussion of these challenges ...


Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography In 3 Tesla: 2d Mrcp Versus 3d Mrcp In Diagnostic Evaluation With Special Reference To Different Acquisition And Reconstruction Planes, Vikram Patil, Nayana Shabadi, Sudha Das, SMC Shetty, Kamal Sen 2015 JSS Medical College

Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography In 3 Tesla: 2d Mrcp Versus 3d Mrcp In Diagnostic Evaluation With Special Reference To Different Acquisition And Reconstruction Planes, Vikram Patil, Nayana Shabadi, Sudha Das, Smc Shetty, Kamal Sen

The Journal of Global Radiology

Purpose: Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is an established technique for the evaluation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts in patients with known or suspected hepatobiliary disease. However, the ideal acquisition and reconstruction plane for optimal bile duct evaluation with 3D technique has not been evaluated.The purpose of our study was to compare different acquisition and reconstruction planes of 3D MRCP for bile duct assessment.

Methods: 51 consecutive adult patients suspected to have pancreatico-biliary disease were examined with 3 Tesla (Philips 3 T Ingenia) system both a multi thin slice (3D) and a breath-hold (Single Shot) MRCP technique were performed ...


Evaluation Of The Benefits And Risks Of Introducing Ebola Community Care Centers, Sierra Leone, Adam J. Kucharski, Anton Camacho, Francesco Checchi, Ronald J. Waldman, Rebecca F. Grais, Jean-Clement Cabrol, Sylvie Briand, Marc Baguelin, Stefan Flasche, Sebastian Funk, W. John Edmunds 2015 George Washington University

Evaluation Of The Benefits And Risks Of Introducing Ebola Community Care Centers, Sierra Leone, Adam J. Kucharski, Anton Camacho, Francesco Checchi, Ronald J. Waldman, Rebecca F. Grais, Jean-Clement Cabrol, Sylvie Briand, Marc Baguelin, Stefan Flasche, Sebastian Funk, W. John Edmunds

Global Health Faculty Publications

In some parts of western Africa, Ebola treatment centers (ETCs) have reached capacity. Unless capacity is rapidly scaled up, the chance to avoid a generalized Ebola epidemic will soon diminish. The World Health Organization and partners are considering additional Ebola patient care options, including community care centers (CCCs), small, lightly staffed units that could be used to isolate patients outside the home and get them into care sooner than otherwise possible. Using a transmission model, we evaluated the benefits and risks of introducing CCCs into Sierra Leone’s Western Area, where most ETCs are at capacity. We found that use ...


Bidirectional Global Health Education: The Rvcp-Jeff Health Exchange Program, Ellen J. Plumb MD, James D. Plumb MD, MPH, Komal S. Soin MD 2015 Thomas Jefferson University

Bidirectional Global Health Education: The Rvcp-Jeff Health Exchange Program, Ellen J. Plumb Md, James D. Plumb Md, Mph, Komal S. Soin Md

Population Health Matters (Formerly Health Policy Newsletter)

No abstract provided.


Cervical Cancer In Guatemala: Using Visual Inspection With Acetic Acid Screening To Reduce Incidence Of And Mortality From Cervical Cancer, Zachary Klock 2015 Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University

Cervical Cancer In Guatemala: Using Visual Inspection With Acetic Acid Screening To Reduce Incidence Of And Mortality From Cervical Cancer, Zachary Klock

CWiC-PH

Guatemala is a developing nation of nearly 16 million in Central America. Among the many health problems the nation suffers, cervical cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. Cervical cancer, an easily detectable cancer, predominantly affects women in developing nations. Traditional cytology techniques have been used to screen women in the country for over 25 years, but less than 10% of the Guatemalan population is screened. The Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid (VIA) is a simple produce that uses acetic acid to visualize precancerous cervical lesions and has been proven to be more effective in resource-poor settings. The screening ...


Universal Healthcare: Costa Rica As A Model, Annie J. Ferris 2015 Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Philadelphia, PA

Universal Healthcare: Costa Rica As A Model, Annie J. Ferris

CWiC-PH

What it Looks Like in Costa Rica

  • Run by the Costa Rican Social Security Administration
  • Financed by employers, employees, and the Ministry of Health. Employer and employee contributions together make up over 90% of contributions.
  • Costa Rica is divided into 105 health areas, which are further divided up into primary care units called Basic Provision Units of Integrated Healthcare, or EBAIS. There are 947 of these primary care centers throughout Costa Rica, and everyone is assigned to one.
  • The EBAIS clinics provide a wide range of services to cover the general and specific health needs of the community, including primary ...


Health Care In Bolivia: A First Hand Experience, Sanchi Malhotra 2015 Jefferson Office of International Affairs

Health Care In Bolivia: A First Hand Experience, Sanchi Malhotra

CWiC-PH

This research project is based on a one month work experience in Cochabamba, Boliva through the NGO Sustainable Bolivia at Hosptial Viedma, a major public hospital and Centre de Salud Pacata, a rural outpatient health clinic. The information presented below is derived from both research and personal experience. This trip was partially funded by Jefferson Office of International Affairs with the goal of gaining experience and knowledge about the Bolivian health care system.


The Effect Of Peer Educators On Medication Adherence In Hiv Patients In Cochabamba, Bolivia, George Ru 2015 Office of International Affairs, Thomas Jefferson University; Office of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives, Thomas Jefferson University; Vivo en Positivo

The Effect Of Peer Educators On Medication Adherence In Hiv Patients In Cochabamba, Bolivia, George Ru

CWiC-PH

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

  • Bolivia is the least developed country in South America, with high levels of poverty, poor access to safe water, and low economic activity. Bolivia’s GDP, in US dollars, in 2013 was $30.60 billion and the gross national income, per capita in US dollars was $2,550, which both rank either at or near the bottom of the list for all South American countries (7).
  • The Ministry of Health and Sports (MSD) is the national governing body responsible for formulating the strategy, policies, plans and programs in health. The Department of Health Services (SEDES) is the highest ...


Globally Minded, Locally Serving: Refugee Health In Philadelphia, Sarah Jamieson, Angelica Montes, Gretchen Shanfeld, MPH, Rickie Brawer, MPH, PhD, Caryn Johnson, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, James D. Plumb, MD, MPH 2015 Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Occupational Therapy

Globally Minded, Locally Serving: Refugee Health In Philadelphia, Sarah Jamieson, Angelica Montes, Gretchen Shanfeld, Mph, Rickie Brawer, Mph, Phd, Caryn Johnson, Ms, Otr/L, Faota, James D. Plumb, Md, Mph

CWiC-PH

Introduction

A refugee is someone who is forced to leave their country of origin due to war, violence, or persecution. The United States is the world’s top resettlement country. Out of the 50 states, Pennsylvania is 5th in terms of the number of annually resettled refugees. Each year, Philadelphia resettles approximately 800 refugees. Bhutan, Burma, Iraq, Eritrea, Sudan, and Democratic Republic of Congo are the most frequent countries of origin in Philadelphia.


Alternative Income Generation For Kenyan Women: Preventing Prostitution And The Spread Of Hiv, Megan Elizabeth Lundy 2015 JMC MD Candidate

Alternative Income Generation For Kenyan Women: Preventing Prostitution And The Spread Of Hiv, Megan Elizabeth Lundy

CWiC-PH

HIV/AIDS in Mlolongo, Kenya

Mombasa Highway and Weigh Station

  • Truckers spend 3+ days waiting to be processed, providing a costumer base for prostitution
  • In Kenya, 27.6% of female sex workers are HIV positive and only 26.8% use condoms with all of their partners (Morris, Morris, and Ferguson, 2009).
  • The rampant spread of HIV and lack of contraception has led to rapid growth in the population in an area that has little ability to support any residents
  • Development of Slums that now line the highway


Hernia Surgery In Rural Ghana, West Africa: Barriers To Health Care And Their Implications, Laura Traub 2015 Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Population Health College within a College 2017, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA

Hernia Surgery In Rural Ghana, West Africa: Barriers To Health Care And Their Implications, Laura Traub

CWiC-PH

The information presented is a the product of a six week international rotation at Volta Regional Hospital and Royal Hospital through Blue-Med Africa, a non-governmental organization based out of Ho, Ghana. The goal of the rotation was to obtain an understanding of healthcare in Ghana and identify the differences between surgical procedures in West Africa and the U.S.


Evaluating And Responding To Medical Student Demand For Global Health Education, Angela Ugorets, BS, Maria Montano, MPH, Michael Cafarchio, MD, Daniel Becchi, BA, Annie Masterson, BA, Nithin Paul, BA, Ellen Plumb, MD 2015 Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University

Evaluating And Responding To Medical Student Demand For Global Health Education, Angela Ugorets, Bs, Maria Montano, Mph, Michael Cafarchio, Md, Daniel Becchi, Ba, Annie Masterson, Ba, Nithin Paul, Ba, Ellen Plumb, Md

CWiC-PH

Introduction

With the constant interchange of people and diseases across continents, “the separation between domestic and international health problems is no longer useful.” (1) Look no further than the 80,000 refugees currently resettled in the United States for proof that health is a global phenomenon. The medical community needs to respond to the changing global landscape by training future healthcare leaders to think and act globally.

Medical students across the U.S. recognize this need with 68% of U.S. allopathic medical schools having an active student global or international health interest group. (2) Unfortunately, training opportunities lag behind ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress