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1997 Full-Text Articles 3242 Authors 415360 Downloads 103 Institutions

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1997 full-text articles. Page 1 of 76.

Presumed Consent For Organ Donation: Principlism Opts Out, Ryan M. Marquardt 2017 Cedarville University

Presumed Consent For Organ Donation: Principlism Opts Out, Ryan M. Marquardt

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

The number of available organs for transplant each year falls woefully short of the number of patients in need of donated organs in the United States. While approval numbers are very high for organ donation, the number of registered donors is much smaller. A commonly proposed solution to increase the pool of organ donors is to replace the current explicit consent policy with a presumed consent system, where everyone is considered to have consented as a donor unless they have opted out by joining a non-donor registry or by some other method. This proposal raises many ethical questions that must ...


Ambulance Services For Medicare Beneficiaries: State Differences In Usage, 2012-2014, Suzanne Troske, Alison Davis 2017 University of Kentucky

Ambulance Services For Medicare Beneficiaries: State Differences In Usage, 2012-2014, Suzanne Troske, Alison Davis

Rural & Underserved Health Research Center Publications

Ambulance services are at risk of scaling back or dissolving in some places. We analyzed Medicare beneficiaries’ use of ambulance services across the U.S. Improved understanding of how beneficiaries, most of whom are elderly, use these services provides vital information for policymakers who set rules and regulations about access to the services.


Community Paramedicine Pilot Programs: Lessons From Maine, Karen B. Pearson MLIS, MA, George Shaler MPH 2017 University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center

Community Paramedicine Pilot Programs: Lessons From Maine, Karen B. Pearson Mlis, Ma, George Shaler Mph

Access / Insurance

Community paramedicine programs are beginning to flourish across the nation, and the need to provide demonstration or pilot programs is essential to providing a consistent and high-level standard for this model of care. While the overarching goals are to align with the Triple Aim, piloting a community paramedicine program also allows each community to develop and implement a program tailored to the healthcare needs of their specific community. A successful program builds the evidence base that can then be used to create legislative change necessary to financially sustain this model of care across the healthcare delivery system. This article provides ...


The Impact Of State Mandated Healthcare-Associated Infection Reporting On Infection Prevention And Control Departments In Acute Care Hospitals: Results From A National Survey, Carolyn T. A. Herzig, Monika Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Julie Reagan, Elaine Larson, Patricia W. Stone 2017 Columbia University Medical Center

The Impact Of State Mandated Healthcare-Associated Infection Reporting On Infection Prevention And Control Departments In Acute Care Hospitals: Results From A National Survey, Carolyn T. A. Herzig, Monika Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Julie Reagan, Elaine Larson, Patricia W. Stone

Julie Reagan

Background: In addition to federally mandated reporting, most US states have adopted legislation requiring hospitals to submit healthcare-associated infection (HAI) data. Evidence that state HAI laws have increased patient safety and reduced HAI rates is inconsistent, however, and resources needed to comply are considerable. We evaluated the impact of state HAI laws on infection prevention and control departments (IPCD).

Methods: Web-based survey of a national sample of hospital IPCD was conducted in Fall 2011; all non-VA hospitals enrolled in the National Healthcare Safety Network were eligible to participate. States with HAI laws effective prior to Fall 2011 were identified using ...


Impact Of Laws Aimed At Healthcare-Associated Infection Reduction: A Qualitative Study, Patrica W. Stone, Monika Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Julie Reagan, Jacqueline A. Merrill, Brad Sperber, Catherine Cairns, Matthew Penn, Tara Ramanathan, Elizabeth Mothershed, Elizabeth Skillen 2017 Columbia University Medical Center

Impact Of Laws Aimed At Healthcare-Associated Infection Reduction: A Qualitative Study, Patrica W. Stone, Monika Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Julie Reagan, Jacqueline A. Merrill, Brad Sperber, Catherine Cairns, Matthew Penn, Tara Ramanathan, Elizabeth Mothershed, Elizabeth Skillen

Julie Reagan

Background Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are preventable. Globally, laws aimed at reducing HAIs have been implemented. In the USA, these laws are at the federal and state levels. It is not known whether the state interventions are more effective than the federal incentives alone. Objective The aims of this study were to explore the impact federal and state HAI laws have on state departments of health and hospital stakeholders in the USA and to explore similarities and differences in perceptions across states. Methods A qualitative study was conducted. In 2012, we conducted semistructured interviews with key stakeholders from states with and ...


The Impact Of Emotional Intelligence On Conditions Of Trust Among Leaders At The Kentucky Department For Public Health, Jennifer Redmond Knight, Heather M. Bush, William A. Mase, Martha Cornwell Riddell, Meng Liu, James W. Holsinger 2017 University of Kentucky-College of Public Health

The Impact Of Emotional Intelligence On Conditions Of Trust Among Leaders At The Kentucky Department For Public Health, Jennifer Redmond Knight, Heather M. Bush, William A. Mase, Martha Cornwell Riddell, Meng Liu, James W. Holsinger

William A. Mase

There has been limited leadership research on emotional intelligence and trust in governmental public health settings. The purpose of this study was to identify and seek to understand the relationship between trust and elements of emotional intelligence, including stress management, at the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH). The KDPH serves as Kentucky’s state governmental health department. KDPH is led by a Commissioner and composed of seven primary divisions and 25 branches within those divisions. The study was a non-randomized cross-sectional study utilizing electronic surveys that evaluated conditions of trust among staff members and emotional intelligence among supervisors. Pearson ...


The Impact Of Emotional Intelligence On Conditions Of Trust Among Leaders At The Kentucky Department For Public Health, Jennifer Redmond Knight, Heather M. Bush, William A. Mase, Martha Cornwell Riddell, Meng Liu, James W. Holsinger 2017 University of Kentucky

The Impact Of Emotional Intelligence On Conditions Of Trust Among Leaders At The Kentucky Department For Public Health, Jennifer Redmond Knight, Heather M. Bush, William A. Mase, Martha Cornwell Riddell, Meng Liu, James W. Holsinger

William A. Mase

There has been limited leadership research on emotional intelligence and trust in governmental public health settings. The purpose of this study was to identify and seek to understand the relationship between trust and elements of emotional intelligence, including stress management, at the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH). The KDPH serves as Kentucky’s state governmental health department. KDPH is led by a Commissioner and composed of seven primary divisions and 25 branches within those divisions. The study was a non-randomized cross-sectional study utilizing electronic surveys that evaluated conditions of trust among staff members and emotional intelligence among supervisors. Pearson ...


Georgia’S Rural Hospital Closures: The Common-Good Approach To Ethical Decision-Making, Randi G. Bastain, Marcus Garner, John S. Barron, Emmanuel A. Akowuah, William A. Mase 2017 Georgia Southern University

Georgia’S Rural Hospital Closures: The Common-Good Approach To Ethical Decision-Making, Randi G. Bastain, Marcus Garner, John S. Barron, Emmanuel A. Akowuah, William A. Mase

William A. Mase

Background: Critical access hospitals provide several essential services to local communities. Along with the functions associated with providing necessary medical care, they also offer employment opportunities and other economic benefits to the communities they serve. Since 2010, the number of rural hospitals closures has steadily increased. The common-good approach to ethical decision-making provides a framework that aids in evaluation of the effects that hospital closures have on rural residents and communities.

Methods: This analysis includes results of a systematic overview of peer-reviewed literature to address the following research questions: 1) How have state policies and the adoption of Medicaid expansion ...


Geographic Variation Within The Military Health System, Linda Kimsey, Samuel Olaiya, Chad Smith, Andrew Hoburg, Stuart R. Lipsitz, Tracey Koehlmoos, Louis L. Nguyen, Joel S. Weissman 2017 Georgia Southern University

Geographic Variation Within The Military Health System, Linda Kimsey, Samuel Olaiya, Chad Smith, Andrew Hoburg, Stuart R. Lipsitz, Tracey Koehlmoos, Louis L. Nguyen, Joel S. Weissman

Linda Kimsey

Background: This study seeks to quantify variation in healthcare utilization and per capita costs using system-defined geographic regions based on enrollee residence within the Military Health System (MHS).

Methods: Data for fiscal years 2007 – 2010 were obtained from the Military Health System under a data sharing agreement with the Defense Health Agency (DHA). DHA manages all aspects of the Department of Defense Military Health System, including TRICARE. Adjusted rates were calculated for per capita costs and for two procedures with high interest to the MHS- back surgery and Cesarean sections for TRICARE Prime and Plus enrollees. Coefficients of variation (CoV ...


Racial Disparities In Emergency General Surgery: Do Differences In Outcomes Persist Among Universally Insured Military Patients?, Cheryl Zogg, Wei Jiang, Muhammed Ali Chaudhary, John Scott, Adil A. Shah, Stuart R. Lipsitz, Joel S. Weissman, Zara Cooper, Ali Salim, Stephanie L. Nitzschke, Louis L. Nguyen, Lorens A. Helmchen, Linda Kimsey, Samuel Olaiya, Peter A. Learn, Adil H. Haider 2017 Harvard Medical School

Racial Disparities In Emergency General Surgery: Do Differences In Outcomes Persist Among Universally Insured Military Patients?, Cheryl Zogg, Wei Jiang, Muhammed Ali Chaudhary, John Scott, Adil A. Shah, Stuart R. Lipsitz, Joel S. Weissman, Zara Cooper, Ali Salim, Stephanie L. Nitzschke, Louis L. Nguyen, Lorens A. Helmchen, Linda Kimsey, Samuel Olaiya, Peter A. Learn, Adil H. Haider

Linda Kimsey

Research Objective: Described as one of the most serious health problems affecting the nation, racial disparities are estimated to account for >83,000 deaths, >$57 billion per year. They have been identified in multiple surgical settings, including differences in outcomes by race among emergency general surgery(EGS) patients. As many minority patients are uninsured, increasing access to care is thought to be a viable solution to mitigate inequities. The objectives of this study were to determine whether racial disparities in 30/90/180day outcomes exist within a universally-insured population of military/civilian-dependent EGS patients and whether differences in outcomes differentially ...


Evaluation Of The Massachusetts Peer Specialist Training And Certification Program (Phase Two), Linda M. Cabral, Kathy Muhr, Laura A. Sefton, Judith A. Savageau 2017 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Evaluation Of The Massachusetts Peer Specialist Training And Certification Program (Phase Two), Linda M. Cabral, Kathy Muhr, Laura A. Sefton, Judith A. Savageau

Judith A. Savageau

Most public mental health systems are shifting to a recovery-oriented system of care; however, offering recovery-oriented and peer support services to various cultural and linguistic groups is challenging. This study sought to better understand how persons with mental health conditions from two cultural groups – Latinos and Deaf and Hard of Hearing (D/HH) - access recovery-based services. Interviews with national key informants were conducted prior to data collection to better formulate instruments. Cultural brokers, identified as leaders in their communities who also have mental health conditions, were hired to aid in recruitment and data collection. Interviews and focus groups were conducted ...


Self-Injurious Behaviors In Prisons: A Nationwide Survey Of Correctional Mental Health Directors, Kenneth L. Appelbaum, Judith A. Savageau, Robert L. Trestman, Jeffrey L. Metzner 2017 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Self-Injurious Behaviors In Prisons: A Nationwide Survey Of Correctional Mental Health Directors, Kenneth L. Appelbaum, Judith A. Savageau, Robert L. Trestman, Jeffrey L. Metzner

Judith A. Savageau

Self-injurious behavior (SIB) by inmates has serious health, safety, operational, security and fiscal consequences. Serious incidents require a freeze in normal facility operations. Injuries that need outside medical attention create additional security risks, including potential escape attempts. The interruption of normal operations, diversion of staff, cost of outside care, and drain on medical and mental health resources all have significant fiscal consequences. This session will present the results and implications of a survey of the Mental Health Directors in all 51 state and federal prison systems on the extent of SIB by inmates, including incidence and prevalence, adverse consequences, and ...


Using A Deliberative Dialogue To Facilitate The Uptake Of Research Evidence In Rehabilitation For Children With Cerebral Palsy, Alisiyah Daya 2017 The University of Western Ontario

Using A Deliberative Dialogue To Facilitate The Uptake Of Research Evidence In Rehabilitation For Children With Cerebral Palsy, Alisiyah Daya

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

This study explores how to facilitate the use of research evidence to optimize outcomes for children with cerebral palsy (CP) in practice. Findings from two studies were used as the basis for exploring how to comprehensively assess developmental trajectories of children with CP and plan individualized interventions. Seventeen affiliated stakeholders (e.g. physicians, senior leadership, frontline clinicians, families and youth with CP) participated in this study.

Data from a deliberative dialogue and interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methods with a pragmatic perspective. The results highlighted that all areas of practice must engage in knowledge translation to be effective. Stakeholders ...


Contracting Of Primary Health Care Services In Pakistan: Is Up-Scaling A Pragmatic Thinking, Babar Shaikh, F. Rabbani, Najibullah Safi, Zia Dawar 2017 Aga Khan University

Contracting Of Primary Health Care Services In Pakistan: Is Up-Scaling A Pragmatic Thinking, Babar Shaikh, F. Rabbani, Najibullah Safi, Zia Dawar

Fauziah Rabbani

Quite often, public health care systems in developing countries are struggling because of incompetence and a lack of provider responsiveness to the needs of consumers. On the contrary, the private sector dominates the system of health provision. In recent years, contracting has been experimented as an approach to ensure delivery of comprehensive public health services in an efficient, effective, superior and fair manner and has generally thrived well. The state's healthcare system in Pakistan has suffered a lot, owing to structural fragmentation, resource scarcity, inefficiency and lack of functional specificity, gender insensitivity and inaccessibility. However, partnering with the private ...


Barriers And Facilitators To The Integration Of Mental Health Services Into Primary Health Care: A Systematic Review Protocol., Edith K Wakida, Dickens Akena, Elialilia S Okello, Alison Kinengyere, Ronald Kamoga, Arnold Mindra, Celestino Obua, Zohray M Talib 2017 George Washington University

Barriers And Facilitators To The Integration Of Mental Health Services Into Primary Health Care: A Systematic Review Protocol., Edith K Wakida, Dickens Akena, Elialilia S Okello, Alison Kinengyere, Ronald Kamoga, Arnold Mindra, Celestino Obua, Zohray M Talib

Health Policy and Management Faculty Publications

Background

Mental health is an integral part of health and well-being and yet health systems have not adequately responded to the burden of mental disorders. Integrating mental health services into primary health care (PHC) is the most viable way of closing the treatment gap and ensuring that people get the mental health care they need. PHC was formally adapted by the World Health Organization (WHO), and they have since invested enormous amounts of resources across the globe to ensure that integration of mental health services into PHC works.

Methods

This review will use the SPIDER (Sample, Phenomenon of Interest, Design ...


Effectiveness Of Four-Decontamination Techniques On Bacterial Growth On Cpr Manikins After Use In A Cpr Course, Rachel K. Katch, David C. Berry 2017 University of Connecticut - Storrs

Effectiveness Of Four-Decontamination Techniques On Bacterial Growth On Cpr Manikins After Use In A Cpr Course, Rachel K. Katch, David C. Berry

International Journal of First Aid Education

Context: The American Red Cross and American Heart Association are strong advocates of preventing disease transmission during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training by promoting careful and consistent manikin decontamination. Because CPR is taught worldwide, identifying low-cost, efficient, and effective means of decontamination is imperative. Objective: Determine the degree of contamination on CPR manikins after routine use, and evaluate the efficacy of four disinfecting methods to reduce bacterial growth. Design: Descriptive laboratory. Setting: CPR class; microbiology laboratory. Subjects Forty-eight Actar 911™ CPR manikins (Armstrong Medical Industries, Lincolnshire, IL). Main Outcome Measure(s): Dependent variable was bacterial colony growth (count); independent variable was ...


Integrating Third Party Liability (Tpl) Across Medicaid Operations And Enterprise Systems In Massachusetts, Jenifer Hartman 2017 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Integrating Third Party Liability (Tpl) Across Medicaid Operations And Enterprise Systems In Massachusetts, Jenifer Hartman

Commonwealth Medicine Publications

This poster highlights the results of a UMass Medical School partnership with MassHealth, the Massachusetts Medicaid program, to integrate third party liability (TPL) activities across all aspects of the Medicaid program. By embedding TPL at all stages of Medicaid operations and interfacing with all Medicaid systems, the partners optimized identification of and access to TPL sources for all Medicaid members.

The TPL activities include eligibility coordination, coverage coordination, payment coordination and recovery coordination. The partnership has achieved over $40 million in cost avoidance through the identification of missed Medicare benefits, over $64 million in cost avoidance over enhanced coordination of ...


Refugee-Centered Medical Home:A New Approach To Care At The University Of Louisville Global Health Center, Rahel Bosson, Ruth M. Carrico, Anupama Raghuram, Paula Peyrani, William A. Mattingly, Rebecca Ford, Stephen P. Furmanek, Julio A. Ramirez 2017 University of Louisville

Refugee-Centered Medical Home:A New Approach To Care At The University Of Louisville Global Health Center, Rahel Bosson, Ruth M. Carrico, Anupama Raghuram, Paula Peyrani, William A. Mattingly, Rebecca Ford, Stephen P. Furmanek, Julio A. Ramirez

Journal of Refugee & Global Health

Refugees arrive to the United States with a full spectrum of health conditions, many of which involve intense case management requiring significant financial investments and use of healthcare resources. Kentucky receives more than 3,000 new refugees each year and ranked 10th in the nation for numbers of new arrivals resettled during 2015. These refugees arrive from diverse countries representing different cultures and speaking different languages. In addition, they arrive with diverse health conditions and medical needs. The aims of this paper are to share experiences from the University of Louisville Global Health Center regarding conceptualization, implementation and evaluation of ...


Evaluating Mental Health In Cuban Refugees: The Role Of The Refugee Health Screener-15, Rahel Bosson, Victoria A. Schlaudt, Monnica T. Williams, Ruth M. Carrico, Adriana Peña, Julio A. Ramirez, Jonathan Kanter 2017 University of Louisville

Evaluating Mental Health In Cuban Refugees: The Role Of The Refugee Health Screener-15, Rahel Bosson, Victoria A. Schlaudt, Monnica T. Williams, Ruth M. Carrico, Adriana Peña, Julio A. Ramirez, Jonathan Kanter

Journal of Refugee & Global Health

The Refugee Health Screener-15 (RHS-15) is widely used in refugee populations, but the psychometric properties and clinical utility have not been evaluated in Cuban refugees and entrants. The current study explored results from the Spanish version of the RHS-15 in a sample of 53 Cuban entrants and refugees, and of these, 17.6% screened positive for a mental health concern. Analyses suggested that a positive screening was significantly related to symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder; however, it was not associated with demographic variables such as gender, mode of transport, or the number of countries through which a ...


Teen, Parent, And Clinician Expectations About Obesity And Related Conditions During The Annual Well-Child Visit, Andrew S. Bossick, Charles Barone, Gwen L. Alexander, Heather A. Olden, Tanya Troy, Andrea E. Cassidy-Bushrow 2017 Henry Ford Health System

Teen, Parent, And Clinician Expectations About Obesity And Related Conditions During The Annual Well-Child Visit, Andrew S. Bossick, Charles Barone, Gwen L. Alexander, Heather A. Olden, Tanya Troy, Andrea E. Cassidy-Bushrow

Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews

Purpose: This study aimed to examine family (patient, parent/guardian) and clinician preferences for identification and management of obesity and obesity-related conditions during the well-child visit.

Methods: Four focus groups with teen patients (n = 16), four focus groups with parents (n = 15) and one focus group with providers (n = 12) were conducted using a structured moderator guide tailored to each population. Eligible patients had a well-child visit during the past 12 months and a diagnosis of overweight, obesity, hyperlipidemia or elevated blood pressure. Parents who attended their child’s well-child visit and whose child met the diagnostic criteria were eligible ...


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