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Plant-Powered: A Digital Plant-Based Nutrition Intervention For Low-Income Patients With Type Ii Diabetes, Ellen Pelos 2020 The University of San Francisco

Plant-Powered: A Digital Plant-Based Nutrition Intervention For Low-Income Patients With Type Ii Diabetes, Ellen Pelos

Master's Projects and Capstones

Purpose: This project aimed to measure the acceptability and feasibility of plant-based diets among low-income individuals with type II diabetes at the Samaritan House Food Pharmacy and to create a user-centered pilot program to encourage the adoption of a plant-based diet.

Background: Plant-based diets are effective for preventing, treating, and reversing type II diabetes, but there is not much evidence about the acceptability and feasibility of these diets.

Methods: Focus groups were used to gather qualitative data about the acceptability and feasibility of plant-based diets in the target population. The researcher conducted interviews with Food Pharmacy program leaders to learn ...


Offering Medical Providers Capacity And Competence In Caring For Transgender And Non-Binary Patients: Evaluation Of A Pilot Digital Training Program, Lexis Manzara 2019 The University of San Francisco

Offering Medical Providers Capacity And Competence In Caring For Transgender And Non-Binary Patients: Evaluation Of A Pilot Digital Training Program, Lexis Manzara

Master's Projects and Capstones

Purpose: Stigma and discrimination in health care settings contribute to health disparities for transgender and non-binary (TGNB) people. Evidence suggests that a lack of training on the care for transgender and non-binary TGNB patients in medical school curricula has contributed to providers feeling unprepared to provide quality care for this population. Health care providers have the opportunity to play a key role in the reduction of health disparities for TGNB patients.

Methods: Twenty-five health care providers completed the eight-module digital training program. Pre- and post-tests assessed provider knowledge, self-efficacy, preparedness, and behavior. Paired samples t-tests were conducted to compare pre-and ...


Redefining Trauma: Utilizing Restorative Justice To Repair Care Systems, Emebet Aklilu 2019 The University of San Francisco

Redefining Trauma: Utilizing Restorative Justice To Repair Care Systems, Emebet Aklilu

Master's Projects and Capstones

This project examined the ways in which restorative justice programming can improve trauma informed care among the African American population in Oakland, CA. With 23% of African American men and women living at or below the poverty line in the United States, this project assesses gaps in current trauma informed care practices as evident in the literature. Following a rigorous document review the author coded and organized key programming components following six factors detailed by Rowher, Schoones, and Young (2014). Further examination of these program components was conducted using Bloom’s taxonomy levels to assess program outcomes associated with specific ...


Time To Reconsider The Straddle-Arm Technique: Providing Care For The Conscious Infant Who Is Choking, Adam Gesicki, Shelly Longmore 2019 Canadian Council for First Aid Education (Canadian Red Cross)

Time To Reconsider The Straddle-Arm Technique: Providing Care For The Conscious Infant Who Is Choking, Adam Gesicki, Shelly Longmore

International Journal of First Aid Education

The practice of straddling the infant’s legs on the rescuer’s upper arm continues to be one method taught to support the infant in the delivery of back blows and chest thrusts in the clearing of a foreign body airway obstruction (FBAO) for a conscious infant. The personal teaching experience of the two authors suggests that this may not be physically possible in a substantial number of potential pairings of rescuers and infants. The purpose of this article is to present initial data from exploratory work to support this view, suggesting that continued work is required to improve the ...


The Effect Of Parent-Infant Swim Classes On Maternal Parenting Competence, Emotional Availability, And Aquatic Handling, Hope Sadowski, Chanele Molano 2019 James Madison University

The Effect Of Parent-Infant Swim Classes On Maternal Parenting Competence, Emotional Availability, And Aquatic Handling, Hope Sadowski, Chanele Molano

Showcase of Graduate Research and Creative Activities

Low parenting competence and limited emotional availability decrease the quality of the parent-infant relationship (Young, 2011; Sturge-Apple et al., 2012). However, co-occupations, or reciprocal relationships where the occupations of two or more individuals are interactively shaping each other, have been associated with strengthening parent-infant relationships (Pierce, 2009; Price & Stephenson, 2009). Parent-infant swim classes are co-occupation based interventions that facilitate close bodily contact and teach parents handling skills that can generalize into the home. Numerous websites allude to the benefits of these classes; however, there are currently no evidence-based claims supported by the occupational therapy literature. The researchers hypothesized that parent-infant swim classes would provide clinically relevant improvements in maternal parenting competence, emotional availability, and aquatic handling skills.

This study utilized a concurrent, mixed-methods strategy with a one-group pretest posttest design and a phenomenological design ...


Effect Of A 24-Week Randomized Trial Of An Organic Produce Intervention On Pyrethroid And Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure Among Pregnant Women, Cynthia L. Curl, Jessica Porter, Ian Penwell, Rachel Phinney, Marai Ospina, Antonia M. Calafat 2019 Boise State University

Effect Of A 24-Week Randomized Trial Of An Organic Produce Intervention On Pyrethroid And Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure Among Pregnant Women, Cynthia L. Curl, Jessica Porter, Ian Penwell, Rachel Phinney, Marai Ospina, Antonia M. Calafat

Community and Environmental Health Faculty Publications and Presentations

Background: Introduction of an organic diet can significantly reduce exposure to some classes of pesticides in children and adults, but no long-term trials have been conducted. Objectives: To assess the effect of a long-term (24-week) organic produce intervention on pesticide exposure among pregnant women.

Methods: We recruited 20 women from the Idaho Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program during their first trimester of pregnancy. Eligible women were nonsmokers aged 18–35 years who reported eating exclusively conventionally grown food. We randomly assigned participants to receive weekly deliveries of either organic or conventional fruits and vegetables throughout their second or third ...


Addressing Challenges To The Reliable, Large-Scale Implementation Of Effective School Health Education, Michael J. Mann, David K. Lohrmann 2019 Boise State University

Addressing Challenges To The Reliable, Large-Scale Implementation Of Effective School Health Education, Michael J. Mann, David K. Lohrmann

Community and Environmental Health Faculty Publications and Presentations

The long-held priority of teaching young people the knowledge and skills needed for healthy living has recently been diminished in many preK-12 schools. Driven by federal and state priorities, laws, and policies associated with high-stakes testing, instruction in untested subjects has been reduced or eliminated in most schools in order to devote more attention to tested subjects, like reading, math, writing, and science. This article proposes a pathway to ensure that all children are able to learn what society knows about health. To that end, four challenges to the reliable, large-scale implementation of effective school health education are identified: (1 ...


Detecting, Preventing, And Treating Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Adolescent Arrestees: An Unmet Public Health Need, Christopher Salvatore, Steven Belenko, Richard Dembo, Matthew Rollie, Kristina Childs 2019 Montclair State University

Detecting, Preventing, And Treating Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Adolescent Arrestees: An Unmet Public Health Need, Christopher Salvatore, Steven Belenko, Richard Dembo, Matthew Rollie, Kristina Childs

Christopher Salvatore

Studies of detained and incarcerated adolescent offenders in the United States indicate that these juveniles have an elevated risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, many more arrestees enter the “front end” of the juvenile justice system that is detained or incarcerated, and research into the STD risk profiles and service needs of this larger group is lacking. An expansion of STD testing (including of asymptomatic youths), prevention, and treatment is needed, as is improved knowledge about gender- and race-specific services. A pilot program in Florida has shown that juvenile justice and public health systems can collaborate to implement STD ...


I Live Alone But Don't Feel Alone: Social Isolation And Loneliness From The Patient Perspective, Julia Bedard-Thomas, Christian Gausvik, Jonathan Wessels, Saundra Regan, Keesha Goodnow, Anna Goroncy 2019 University of Cincinnati; The Christ Hospital

I Live Alone But Don't Feel Alone: Social Isolation And Loneliness From The Patient Perspective, Julia Bedard-Thomas, Christian Gausvik, Jonathan Wessels, Saundra Regan, Keesha Goodnow, Anna Goroncy

Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews

A growing homebound population may be at risk for social isolation and loneliness. Health-related social needs play a contributing role in these conditions. Research shows social isolation and loneliness are drivers of health outcomes. This pilot feasibility study seeks to explore patient-centered insight into perceptions of social isolation and loneliness in a homebound population. Eight participants were recruited from a home-based primary care practice within a family medicine residency program. One 30-minute semi-structured interview was completed in participants’ homes. The interview focused on loneliness and social isolation, using the 6-item De Jong Gerveld loneliness scale. Three qualitative analysts open-coded transcriptions ...


Is There Less Opioid Abuse In States Where Marijuana Has Been Decriminalized, Either For Medicinal Or Recreational Use? A Clin-Iq, Aaron M. Wendelboe, Richard Mathew, Tana Chongsuwat, Elizabeth Rainwater, Mark A. Wendelboe, Elizabeth Wickersham MD, Ann F. Chou 2019 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Is There Less Opioid Abuse In States Where Marijuana Has Been Decriminalized, Either For Medicinal Or Recreational Use? A Clin-Iq, Aaron M. Wendelboe, Richard Mathew, Tana Chongsuwat, Elizabeth Rainwater, Mark A. Wendelboe, Elizabeth Wickersham Md, Ann F. Chou

Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews

Opioid use, abuse, and associated mortality have reached an epidemic level. In some states, cannabis is being used to treat chronic pain. To examine the hypothesis that medical marijuana legislation may reduce adverse opioid-related outcomes if patients substitute cannabis for opioids for pain management, we conducted a clinical inquiry (Clin-IQ). We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, and Embase for studies using the search terms marijuana, cannabis, legal, marijuana smoking, medical marijuana, opioid-related disorders, cannabis use, medical cannabis, legal aspect, and opiate addiction. We included population-based articles published from January 1, 2012, through December 5, 2018, that assessed the relationship ...


Contraceptive Use Following Unintended Pregnancy Among Ugandan Women Living With Hiv, Jana Jarolimova, Jerome Kabakyenga, Kara Bennett, Winnie R. Muyindike, Annet Kembabazi, Jeffrey N. Martin, Peter W. Hunt, Yap Boum, Jessica E. Haberer, David Bangsberg, Angela Kaida, Lynn T. Matthews 2019 Massachusetts General Hospital

Contraceptive Use Following Unintended Pregnancy Among Ugandan Women Living With Hiv, Jana Jarolimova, Jerome Kabakyenga, Kara Bennett, Winnie R. Muyindike, Annet Kembabazi, Jeffrey N. Martin, Peter W. Hunt, Yap Boum, Jessica E. Haberer, David Bangsberg, Angela Kaida, Lynn T. Matthews

OHSU-PSU School of Public Health Faculty Publications and Presentations

Background: Preventing unintended pregnancy is critical for women living with HIV (WLWH) to safely achieve their reproductive goals. Family planning services should support WLWH at risk of repeat unintended pregnancies. We examined the relationship between unintended pregnancy and subsequent contraception use among WLWH in Uganda.

Study design: This was a retrospective analysis of data from a longitudinal cohort of individuals initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), restricted to women with pregnancy (confirmed via urine β-hcg testing) between 2011–2013. The exposure of interest was intended vs unintended pregnancy, and the outcome was self-report of modern contraceptive use (hormonal methods, intrauterine device, sterilization ...


The Role Of The Pharmacy Team In Atrial Fibrillation Detection In Nonclinical Settings, Brian C. Hazelrigg, Monica L. Miller, Sotiris Antoniou, Jagjot Chahal, Sadeer Fhadil 2019 Purdue University

The Role Of The Pharmacy Team In Atrial Fibrillation Detection In Nonclinical Settings, Brian C. Hazelrigg, Monica L. Miller, Sotiris Antoniou, Jagjot Chahal, Sadeer Fhadil

Purdue Journal of Service-Learning and International Engagement

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac/heart disease that increases a person’s risk of death, making early identification significant in overall disease management. Throughout my time in pharmacy school, I [Brian] have developed an interest in cardiology and research. During my last year of pharmacy school, I spent eight weeks at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, in London, England, one of the largest cardiac centers within Europe, on an experiential training experience. While there, I had the opportunity to study specifics about many cardiac illnesses, with a focus on atrial fibrillation, and provide education to patients living with this ...


Population Health Management, Data And Technology, Helena Ladd, Cody Hepp, Anna McCloud, Hannah Granger, Mary Ellen Hethcox, Samuel Calabrese 2019 Ohio Northern University

Population Health Management, Data And Technology, Helena Ladd, Cody Hepp, Anna Mccloud, Hannah Granger, Mary Ellen Hethcox, Samuel Calabrese

Pharmacy and Wellness Review

No abstract provided.


A Pharmacist's Guide To Vaccinations, Amy Gillman, Jessica Beck, Vincent Wu 2019 Ohio Northern University

A Pharmacist's Guide To Vaccinations, Amy Gillman, Jessica Beck, Vincent Wu

Pharmacy and Wellness Review

No abstract provided.


Development Of A Customized Vaping Cessation Initiative To Assist Massachusetts Youth Who Wish To Quit Vaping, Karen Del'Olio, Nanette Vitali, Webb Camille, Caroline Cranos, Lori Pbert 2019 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Development Of A Customized Vaping Cessation Initiative To Assist Massachusetts Youth Who Wish To Quit Vaping, Karen Del'olio, Nanette Vitali, Webb Camille, Caroline Cranos, Lori Pbert

University of Massachusetts Medical School Publications

The U.S. Surgeon General has identified the use of e-cigarettes, known as vaping, as an epidemic among our youth, addicting a new generation to nicotine. In addition, the growing number of cases of lung injury and deaths associated with e-cigarette use reported to CDC adds to the urgency in addressing this epidemic.

The Massachusetts Youth Health Survey (MYHS, 2017) reports 20.1% of high schoolers currently use e-cigarettes while 10% of middle schoolers have tried e-cigarettes. Since the MYHS report, the vaping epidemic has risen nationally at an alarming rate with an additional 1.5 million more youth using ...


Health Risks And Emerging Trends With The Use Of Electronic Cigarettes, Lucy Wagala, Austin Hopkins, Natalie Lennartz, Brian Heilbronner, Brittany L. Long, Natalie DiPietro Mager 2019 Ohio Northern University

Health Risks And Emerging Trends With The Use Of Electronic Cigarettes, Lucy Wagala, Austin Hopkins, Natalie Lennartz, Brian Heilbronner, Brittany L. Long, Natalie Dipietro Mager

Pharmacy and Wellness Review

Cigarette smoking is associated with many health risks and complications. Despite smokers' strong desire to quit, most battle with nicotine withdrawal and relapse. Because electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) do not contain tobacco, some believe them to be safer than traditional cigarettes and have used them as a replacement or adjunct nicotine source to prevent withdrawal symptoms. Electronic cigarettes are designed to mimic traditional cigarettes and expel a vapor composed of nicotine, water, glycerol, propylene glycol and other flavorings. Many e-cigarette companies use appealing platforms, which promise smoking cessation and harm reduction, to attract consumers; however, several studies have found e-cigarettes actually ...


Improving Healthcare Costs And Patient Outcomes Across Healthcare Professions, Hannah Lamb, Jourdan Ujlaki, Paige Torbet, Isabel Cwikla, Rebecca Worden, Michael Rush 2019 Ohio Northern University

Improving Healthcare Costs And Patient Outcomes Across Healthcare Professions, Hannah Lamb, Jourdan Ujlaki, Paige Torbet, Isabel Cwikla, Rebecca Worden, Michael Rush

Pharmacy and Wellness Review

Healthcare professionals must be aware of the importance of preventive medicine and the responsibility they have in contributing to it. There are three levels of preventive medicine that a healthcare professional can provide based on the patient population that is receiving care and the goals of the particular service. Preventive medicine has the ability to improve both overall healthcare costs and have a positive impact on a patient's quality of life. All healthcare professionals have the potential to fulfill a role in each level of preventive medicine, and should understand the role of each member of the healthcare team ...


A Novel Tool To Improve Shared Decision Making And Adherence In Multiple Sclerosis: Development And Preliminary Testing, Nananda Col, Carolina Ionete, Idanis Berrios Morales, Lori Pbert 2019 Shared Decision Making Resources

A Novel Tool To Improve Shared Decision Making And Adherence In Multiple Sclerosis: Development And Preliminary Testing, Nananda Col, Carolina Ionete, Idanis Berrios Morales, Lori Pbert

UMass Worcester PRC Publications

Background. Most people with multiple sclerosis (MS) want to be involved in medical decision making about disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), but new approaches are needed to overcome barriers to participation.

Objectives. We sought to develop a shared decision-making (SDM) tool for MS DMTs, evaluate patient and provider responses to the tool, and address challenges encountered during development to guide a future trial.

Methods. We created a patient-centered design process informed by image theory to develop the MS-SUPPORT SDM tool. Development included semistructured interviews and alpha and beta testing with MS patients and providers. Beta testing assessed dissemination and clinical integration strategies ...


Medically Tailored Meals As A Prescription For Treatment Of Food-Insecure Type 2 Diabetics, Leslie J. Rabaut 2019 Aurora Health Care

Medically Tailored Meals As A Prescription For Treatment Of Food-Insecure Type 2 Diabetics, Leslie J. Rabaut

Aurora Family Medicine Residents

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an immense burden to the health of our population and to our current health care system, and the weight of this burden is only projected to multiply in coming years. A nutritious diet is an indispensable aspect of diabetes treatment, and the lack of access to food engenders poor disease-state control, which correlates with increased health care utilization. Interventions aimed at improving access to food through medically tailored meals (MTMs) have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the health of food-insecure type 2 diabetic patients and reducing health care costs. Further studies are necessary to increase the ...


Modeling Resilience In Resettled Syrian Refugees With Disabilities, Nicholas Sherwood 2019 George Mason University

Modeling Resilience In Resettled Syrian Refugees With Disabilities, Nicholas Sherwood

Conference: The Social Practice of Human Rights

Since 2011, the ongoing conflict in Syria has displaced millions of individuals, many of whom are now resettled across foreign borders. The US currently hosts 21,000 Syrian refugees, and of these, at least 5,000 have a form of disability. Furthermore, many US-based resettlement agencies currently experience strain providing the specialized care required by many of these resettled Syrian refugees with disabilities (RSRD) in large part due to austerity measures imposed by the US Federal government. This research project asks of RSRD themselves: given the limitations placed on your care providers, what personal sources of strength do you utilize ...


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