Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Sports Medicine Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

465 Full-Text Articles 918 Authors 41,470 Downloads 76 Institutions

All Articles in Sports Medicine

Faceted Search

465 full-text articles. Page 21 of 21.

Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2012, St. Cloud State University 2012 St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2012, St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter

Contents of this issue include:

  • Kelly's Corner by David Bacharach
  • Vitamin D in the Winter by Steven Milkovich
  • Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Friend or Foe? by Kyle Mille
  • Moderate Intensity Exercise Helps Reduce the Risk of Dementia by Emily Willaert
  • Fitness Trends in 2012 by Kelley Holmes
  • Single Serving in the New Year? by Kara Mason
  • Physical Activity and the Brain: HPL Alumni Feature: Dr. Steve Gaskill, 1994


Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Alcohol Intake, And Metabolic Syndrome Incidence In Men, Kerem Shuval, Carrie E. Finley, Karen G. Chartier, Bijal A. Balasubramanian, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Carolyn E. Barlow 2012 University of Texas

Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Alcohol Intake, And Metabolic Syndrome Incidence In Men, Kerem Shuval, Carrie E. Finley, Karen G. Chartier, Bijal A. Balasubramanian, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Carolyn E. Barlow

Social Work Publications

Purpose

To prospectively examine the independent and joint effects of alcohol consumption and cardiorespiratory fitness on the incidence of metabolic syndrome in a cohort of men.

Methods

A prospective examination of 3,411 apparently healthy men at baseline, who came to the Cooper Clinic (Dallas, Texas) for at least 2 preventive visits (1979–2010). Primary exposure variables were cardiorespiratory fitness and alcohol intake; the outcome measure was metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the components thereof. Cox proportional hazard models were computed to assess the relationship between the exposure variables and the incidence of MetS while adjusting for confounders.

Results

Over a ...


Extreme Sports: Are They Worth The Risk?, Angela Walin 2012 St. John Fisher College

Extreme Sports: Are They Worth The Risk?, Angela Walin

3690: A Journal of First-Year Student Research Writing

Overview: Broken bones, head trauma, shark attacks, and casualties all while playing the sport you love. Is it worth it? With extreme sports come extreme risks. There are many controversies over these sports as to whether they are ethical or not and why anybody with the right mindset would consider participating in such events. These sports often involve high speed, great heights, a high level of physical exertion, and highly specialized gear or spectacular stunts. Some popular and quickly growing extreme sports in today’s society are snowboarding, speed and freestyle skiing, surfing, sky diving, mountain climbing, and wake boarding ...


Hamstring Strain Injuries: Factors That Lead To Injury And Re-Injury [Accepted Manuscript], David Opar, Morgan Williams, Anthony Shield 2012 Australian Catholic University

Hamstring Strain Injuries: Factors That Lead To Injury And Re-Injury [Accepted Manuscript], David Opar, Morgan Williams, Anthony Shield

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are common in a number of sports and incidence rates have not declined in recent times. Additionally, the high rate of recurrent injuries suggests that our current understanding of HSI and re-injury risk is incomplete. Whilst the multifactoral nature of HSIs is agreed upon by many, often individual risk factors and/or causes of injury are examined in isolation. This review aims to bring together the causes, risk factors and interventions associated with HSIs to better understand why HSIs are so prevalent. Running is often identified as the primary activity type for HSIs and given the ...


Force Output Comparison Between Six U.S. Collegiate Athletic Teams., Caleb D. Bazyler, George Beckham, Howard Gray, Guy Hornsby, Ashley A. Kavanaugh, Christopher MacDonald, Satoshi Mizuguchi, Michael H. Stone, Michael H. Stone 2012 East Tennessee State University

Force Output Comparison Between Six U.S. Collegiate Athletic Teams., Caleb D. Bazyler, George Beckham, Howard Gray, Guy Hornsby, Ashley A. Kavanaugh, Christopher Macdonald, Satoshi Mizuguchi, Michael H. Stone, Michael H. Stone

ETSU Faculty Works

The aim of the study was to compare allometrically scaled peak force and the force at 250 ms between six U.S. collegiate sport teams using isometric mid-thigh pull. Ninety subjects performed maximum effort of isometric mid-thigh pull to measure force output. The data were averaged within the teams, and statistically compared between teams using one-way ANOVA (p=.01). Significant difference was found that men’s soccer and baseball produced higher allometrically scaled peak force, and men’s soccer, tennis, and baseball produced higher allometrically scaled force at 250 ms. The data indicates that not all sports possess similar strength ...


Differential Gene Expression Of Foxo1, Id1, And Id3 Between Young And Older Men And Associations With Muscle Mass And Function, Thomas W. Buford, Matthew B. Cooke, Brian D. Shelmadine, Geoffrey M. Hudson, Liz L. Redd, Darryn S. Willoughby 2011 University of Florida

Differential Gene Expression Of Foxo1, Id1, And Id3 Between Young And Older Men And Associations With Muscle Mass And Function, Thomas W. Buford, Matthew B. Cooke, Brian D. Shelmadine, Geoffrey M. Hudson, Liz L. Redd, Darryn S. Willoughby

Faculty Publications

Background and aims: Aging is associated with significant losses of skeletal muscle mass and function. Numerous biochemical molecules have been implicated in the development of these age-related changes, however evidence from human models is sparse. Assessment of transcript expression is useful as it requires minimal tissue and may potentially be used in clinical trials. This study aimed to compare mRNA expression of proteolytic genes in skeletal muscle of young (18–35 yrs) and older (55–75 yrs) men.

Methods: Muscle tissue was obtained from young (n=14, 21.35±01.03 yrs) and older (n=13, 63.85±1.83 ...


Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2011, St. Cloud State University 2011 St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2011, St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter

Contents of this issue include:

  • Kelly's Corner by David Bacharach
  • Socket Wall Texture by Janna Miron
  • Don’t Lose the Big Picture: Insights for Training by Dennis Madden
  • Block Angle in Swim Starts by Kate Kaufmann
  • Ischemic Strength Training by Chad Johnson
  • HPL Alumni Feature: Dr. Bruce Johnson, 1983


Post-Exercise Protein Synthesis Rates Are Only Marginally Higher In Type I Compared With Type Ii Muscle Fibres Following Resistance-Type Exercise, René Koopman, Benjamin G. Gleeson, Annemie P. Gijsen, Bart B. L. Groen, Joan M. G. Senden, Michael J. Rennie, Luc J. C. van Loon 2011 Australian Catholic University

Post-Exercise Protein Synthesis Rates Are Only Marginally Higher In Type I Compared With Type Ii Muscle Fibres Following Resistance-Type Exercise, René Koopman, Benjamin G. Gleeson, Annemie P. Gijsen, Bart B. L. Groen, Joan M. G. Senden, Michael J. Rennie, Luc J. C. Van Loon

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

We examined the effect of an acute bout of resistance exercise on fractional muscle protein synthesis rates in human type I and type II muscle fibres. After a standardised breakfast (31 ± 1 kJ kg−1 body weight, consisting of 52 Energy% (En%) carbohydrate, 34 En% protein and 14 En% fat), 9 untrained men completed a lower-limb resistance exercise bout (8 sets of 10 repetitions leg press and leg extension at 70% 1RM). A primed, continuous infusion of l-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine was combined with muscle biopsies collected from both legs immediately after exercise and after 6 h of post-exercise recovery. Single ...


Exercise-Induced Splanchnic Hypoperfusion Results In Gut Dysfunction In Healthy Men, Kim V. Wijck, Kaatje Lenaerts, Luc Van Loon, Wilbert H. M. Peters, Wim A. Buurman, Cornelis H. C. Dejong 2011 Australian Catholic University

Exercise-Induced Splanchnic Hypoperfusion Results In Gut Dysfunction In Healthy Men, Kim V. Wijck, Kaatje Lenaerts, Luc Van Loon, Wilbert H. M. Peters, Wim A. Buurman, Cornelis H. C. Dejong

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Background Splanchnic hypoperfusion is common in various pathophysiological conditions and often considered to lead to gut dysfunction. While it is known that physiological situations such as physical exercise also result in splanchnic hypoperfusion, the consequences of flow redistribution at the expense of abdominal organs remained to be determined. This study focuses on the effects of splanchnic hypoperfusion on the gut, and the relationship between hypoperfusion, intestinal injury and permeability during physical exercise in healthy men. Methods and Findings Healthy men cycled for 60 minutes at 70% of maximum workload capacity. Splanchnic hypoperfusion was assessed using gastric tonometry. Blood, sampled every ...


Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2010, St. Cloud State University 2010 St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter, March 2010, St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter

Contents of this issue include:

  • Kelly's Corner by David Bacharach
  • Evolution of an Ergometer by Eric Wright and Dennis Madden
  • Physical Attributes of Youth in an Urban Tennis Program by Kate Kaufmann
  • Stress and your Health by Ashlee Ford
  • Fluid Intake and Athletic Performance by Ashley Davenport and Chad Johnson
  • Improving Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survival Rate by April Kuschke


Hormone And Adpokine Alterations Across Eleven Weeks Of Training In Division I Collegiate Throwers: An Exploratory Study, W. Guy Hornsby, Christian R. Carter, Guy Gregory Haff, Micheal R. Ramsey, Andy R. Dotterweich, N. Travis Triplett, Charles A. Stuart, Margaret E. Stone, Michael H. Stone 2010 West Virginia University

Hormone And Adpokine Alterations Across Eleven Weeks Of Training In Division I Collegiate Throwers: An Exploratory Study, W. Guy Hornsby, Christian R. Carter, Guy Gregory Haff, Micheal R. Ramsey, Andy R. Dotterweich, N. Travis Triplett, Charles A. Stuart, Margaret E. Stone, Michael H. Stone

ETSU Faculty Works

Conceptually, it is important to understand the underlying physiological mechanisms of any training program model. This understanding aids the coach/sport scientist in making better choices in manipulating variables in formulating the training model. These underlying mechanisms can be associated with training variable manipulation and fatigue management aspects as well as the overall health of the athlete. Hormone and cytokine concentrations can be linked to alterations resulting from the manipulation of training variables and to subsequent alterations in performance (Haff et al., 2008; Ishigaki et al., 2005; Jurimae et al., 2010; Stone et al., 2007). For example, alterations in the ...


Relationships Between Jump Characteristics Of Collegiate Female Athletes Competing In Different Disciplines, Christopher J. MacDonalds, Hugh S. Lamont, John C. Garner, Jeremy A. Gentles, Ashley A. Kavanaugh, Michael H. Stone 2010 East Tennessee State University

Relationships Between Jump Characteristics Of Collegiate Female Athletes Competing In Different Disciplines, Christopher J. Macdonalds, Hugh S. Lamont, John C. Garner, Jeremy A. Gentles, Ashley A. Kavanaugh, Michael H. Stone

ETSU Faculty Works

No abstract provided.


Digital Commons powered by bepress