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User Experience In The Visual Notifications On Smart Devices, Young Ae Kim 2022 University of South Dakota

User Experience In The Visual Notifications On Smart Devices, Young Ae Kim

Dissertations and Theses

Notifications on smart devices have a crucial role for the end-users to help decide their action to the information. Despite the flexible customization of notifications for the intuitive user experience, users feel overwhelmed by the number of notifications they receive daily. The nature of notifications is short-lived, but they are extremely intrusive and disengaging. While user experience and user interface are advanced, notifications have remained broken despite their complexity. In fact, the notifications have the poorest usability that users may struggle to customize notifications in their smart devices and choose to ignore them. Irrelevant notifications not only get ignored, but …


Comparative Genomics, Evolutionary Epidemiology, And Rbd-Hace2 Receptor Binding Pattern In B.1.1.7 (Alpha) And B.1.617.2 (Delta) Related To Their Pandemic Response In Uk And India, Chiranjib Chakraborty, Ashish Ranjan Sharma, Manojit Bhattacharya, Bidyut Mallik, Shyam Sundar Nandi, Sang-Soo Lee 2022 Adamas University

Comparative Genomics, Evolutionary Epidemiology, And Rbd-Hace2 Receptor Binding Pattern In B.1.1.7 (Alpha) And B.1.617.2 (Delta) Related To Their Pandemic Response In Uk And India, Chiranjib Chakraborty, Ashish Ranjan Sharma, Manojit Bhattacharya, Bidyut Mallik, Shyam Sundar Nandi, Sang-Soo Lee

Journal Articles: Cellular & Integrative Physiology

BACKGROUND: The massive increase in COVID-19 infection had generated a second wave in India during May-June 2021 with a critical pandemic situation. The Delta variant (B.1.617.2) was a significant factor during the second wave. Conversely, the UK had passed through the crucial phase of the pandemic from November to December 2020 due to B.1.1.7. The study tried to comprehend the pandemic response in the UK and India to the spread of the B.1.1.7 (Alpha, UK) variant and B.1.617.2 (Delta, India) variant.

METHODS: This study was performed in three directions to understand the pandemic response of the two emerging variants. First, …


Time-Dependent Alteration In The Chemoreflex Post-Acute Lung Injury, Kajal Kamra, Nikolay Karpuk, Ryan Adam, Irving H. Zucker, Harold D. Schultz, Han-Jun Wang 2022 University of Nebraska Medical Center

Time-Dependent Alteration In The Chemoreflex Post-Acute Lung Injury, Kajal Kamra, Nikolay Karpuk, Ryan Adam, Irving H. Zucker, Harold D. Schultz, Han-Jun Wang

Journal Articles: Cellular & Integrative Physiology

Acute lung injury (ALI) induces inflammation that disrupts the normal alveolar-capillary endothelial barrier which impairs gas exchange to induce hypoxemia that reflexively increases respiration. The neural mechanisms underlying the respiratory dysfunction during ALI are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the chemoreflex in mediating abnormal ventilation during acute (early) and recovery (late) stages of ALI. We hypothesized that the increase in respiratory rate (fR) during post-ALI is mediated by a sensitized chemoreflex. ALI was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats using a single intra-tracheal injection of bleomycin (Bleo: low-dose = 1.25 mg/Kg or …


Multimodal Medicine: Pain Control Potential, Tyler Ostlund 2022 Roseman University of Health Sciences

Multimodal Medicine: Pain Control Potential, Tyler Ostlund

Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner

Due to the continual problem with overuse of, overdose on, and abuse of opioid medications for the past three decades it is paramount that effective, cheap, and above all safe forms of pain control are studied and applied. Multimodal pain management utilizes a combination of pharmacological and non pharmacological therapies in synergy to control pain and reduce dependence on strictly opioids. Combining the effects of medications or therapies that focus on treating different types or sources of pain such as inflammatory pain, neurological pain, etc. With the adoption of this method of pain management, the longstanding effects of the opioid …


Assessment Of Scientific Payload Carrying Spirulina Onboard Blue Origin’S New Shepard Vehicle, Pedro J. Llanos, Morgan Shilling, Kristina Andrijauskaite, Kody Kidder, Vijay V. Duraisamy 2022 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Assessment Of Scientific Payload Carrying Spirulina Onboard Blue Origin’S New Shepard Vehicle, Pedro J. Llanos, Morgan Shilling, Kristina Andrijauskaite, Kody Kidder, Vijay V. Duraisamy

Publications

The research team at ERAU and UTHSCSA analyzed the effects of suborbital flight stressors and various light conditions (red, white, no light) on the Arthrospira platensis (Spirulina), onboard Blue Origin’s New Shepard vehicle. Commercially available cyanobacterium species were cultivated and closely monitored in mother colonies several months before the suborbital flight mission. The aim of this study was to estimate the biomass production and growth as a potential dietary alternative for prospective human spaceflight's life support system. Spirulina samples were flown in a NanoLab with adjacent avionics supporting the light conditions and sensors to monitor the temperature, relative humidity, and …


Single-Cell Analysis Of Aneurysmal Aortic Tissue In Patients With Marfan Syndrome Reveals Dysfunctional Tgf-Β Signaling, Ashley Dawson, Yanming Li, Yang Li, Pingping Ren, Hernan G. Vasquez, Chen Zhang, Kimberly R. Rebello, Waleed Ageedi, Alon R. Azares, Aladdein Burchett Mattar, Mary Burchett Sheppard, Hong S. Lu, Joseph S. Coselli, Lisa A. Cassis, Alan Daugherty, Ying H. Shen, Scott A. LeMaire 2021 Baylor College of Medicine

Single-Cell Analysis Of Aneurysmal Aortic Tissue In Patients With Marfan Syndrome Reveals Dysfunctional Tgf-Β Signaling, Ashley Dawson, Yanming Li, Yang Li, Pingping Ren, Hernan G. Vasquez, Chen Zhang, Kimberly R. Rebello, Waleed Ageedi, Alon R. Azares, Aladdein Burchett Mattar, Mary Burchett Sheppard, Hong S. Lu, Joseph S. Coselli, Lisa A. Cassis, Alan Daugherty, Ying H. Shen, Scott A. Lemaire

Saha Cardiovascular Research Center Faculty Publications

The molecular and cellular processes leading to aortic aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome (MFS) remain poorly understood. In this study, we examined the changes of aortic cell populations and gene expression in MFS by performing single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA seq) on ascending aortic aneurysm tissues from patients with MFS (n = 3) and age-matched non-aneurysmal control tissues from cardiac donors and recipients (n = 4). The expression of key molecules was confirmed by immunostaining. We detected diverse populations of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), fibroblasts, and endothelial cells (ECs) in the aortic wall. Aortic tissues from MFS showed alterations …


The Effect Of Cancer Cachexia Progression On The Feeding Regulation Of Skeletal Muscle Protein Turnover, Brittany R. Franch 2021 University of Tennessee Health Science Center

The Effect Of Cancer Cachexia Progression On The Feeding Regulation Of Skeletal Muscle Protein Turnover, Brittany R. Franch

Theses and Dissertations (ETD)

Cancer cachexia is defined as the unintentional loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without fat loss that cannot be reversed by conventional nutritional support. Cachexia occurs in ~20% of cancer patients. More specifically, 50% of lung cancer patients, the most common cancer worldwide, develop cachexia. Cachexia occurs most often in lung and gastrointestinal cancers, whereas breast and prostate have the lowest rate of cachexia. Cancer-induced cachexia disrupts skeletal muscle protein turnover (decreasing protein synthesis and increasing protein degradation). Skeletal muscle’s capacity for protein synthesis is highly sensitive to local and systemic stimuli that are controlled by mTORC1 and AMPK …


Role Of Meibum And Tear Phospholipids In The Evaporative Water Loss Associated With Dry Eye., Samiyyah M. Sledge 2021 University of Louisville

Role Of Meibum And Tear Phospholipids In The Evaporative Water Loss Associated With Dry Eye., Samiyyah M. Sledge

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

It is generally believed that the tear film lipid surface film inhibits the rate of evaporation (Revap) of the underlying tear aqueous. It is also generally believed that changes in the composition of the tear film lipid layer is responsible for an increase in Revap in patients with dry eye. Both of these ideas have never been proven. The purpose of the current studies was to test these ideas. Revap was measured in vitro gravimetrically. Lipid spreading was measured using Raman spectroscopy and microscopy. The influence of the following surface films on the Revap of the sub phase of physiologically …


Airway Epithelial Innate Immunity, Sebastian L. Johnston, David L. Goldblatt, Scott E. Evans, Michael J. Tuvim, Burton F. Dickey 2021 The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Airway Epithelial Innate Immunity, Sebastian L. Johnston, David L. Goldblatt, Scott E. Evans, Michael J. Tuvim, Burton F. Dickey

School of Medicine Publications and Presentations

Besides providing an essential protective barrier, airway epithelial cells directly sense pathogens and respond defensively. This is a frontline component of the innate immune system with specificity for different pathogen classes. It occurs in the context of numerous interactions with leukocytes, but here we focus on intrinsic epithelial mechanisms. Type 1 immune responses are directed primarily at intracellular pathogens, particularly viruses. Prominent stimuli include microbial nucleic acids and interferons released from neighboring epithelial cells. Epithelial responses revolve around changes in the expression of interferon-sensitive genes (ISGs) that interfere with viral replication, as well as the further induction of interferons that …


Race And Drug Toxicity: A Study Of Three Cardiovascular Drugs With Strong Pharmacogenetic Recommendations., Travis J. O'Brien, Kevin Fenton, Alfateh Sidahmed, April Barbour, Arthur F Harralson 2021 George Washington University

Race And Drug Toxicity: A Study Of Three Cardiovascular Drugs With Strong Pharmacogenetic Recommendations., Travis J. O'Brien, Kevin Fenton, Alfateh Sidahmed, April Barbour, Arthur F Harralson

Pharmacology and Physiology Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Physiological Roles Of Mammalian Transmembrane Adenylyl Cyclase Isoforms, Katrina F. Ostrom, Justin E. LaVigne, Tarsis F. Brust, Roland Seifert, Carmen Dessauer, Val J. Watts, Rennolds S. Ostrom 2021 Claremont McKenna College

Physiological Roles Of Mammalian Transmembrane Adenylyl Cyclase Isoforms, Katrina F. Ostrom, Justin E. Lavigne, Tarsis F. Brust, Roland Seifert, Carmen Dessauer, Val J. Watts, Rennolds S. Ostrom

Pharmacy Faculty Articles and Research

Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of ATP to the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP. Mammals possess nine isoforms of transmembrane ACs, dubbed AC1-9, that serve as major effector enzymes of G protein-coupled receptors. The transmembrane ACs display varying expression patterns across tissues, giving potential for them having a wide array of physiologic roles. Cells express multiple AC isoforms, implying that ACs have redundant functions. Furthermore, all transmembrane ACs are activated by Gαs so it was long assumed that all ACs are activated by Gαs-coupled GPCRs. AC isoforms partition to different microdomains of the plasma membrane and form …


Nsaids Naproxen, Ibuprofen, Salicylate, And Aspirin Inhibit Trpm7 Channels By Cytosolic Acidification, Rikki Chokshi, Orville Bennett, Tetyana Zhelay, J. Ashot Kozak 2021 Wright State University - Main Campus

Nsaids Naproxen, Ibuprofen, Salicylate, And Aspirin Inhibit Trpm7 Channels By Cytosolic Acidification, Rikki Chokshi, Orville Bennett, Tetyana Zhelay, J. Ashot Kozak

Neuroscience, Cell Biology & Physiology Faculty Publications

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used for relieving pain and inflammation accompanying numerous disease states. The primary therapeutic mechanism of these widely used drugs is the inhibition of cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 (COX1, 2) enzymes that catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. At higher doses, NSAIDs are used for prevention of certain types of cancer and as experimental treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. In the immune system, various NSAIDs have been reported to influence neutrophil function and lymphocyte proliferation, and affect ion channels and cellular calcium homeostasis. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) cation channels are highly expressed in …


Identification And Characterization Of Cyps Induced In The Drosophila Antenna By Exposure To A Plant Odorant, Shane R Baldwin, Pratyajit Mohapatra, Monica Nagalla, Rhea Sindvani, Desiree Amaya, Hope A Dickson, Karen Menuz 2021 University of Connecticut

Identification And Characterization Of Cyps Induced In The Drosophila Antenna By Exposure To A Plant Odorant, Shane R Baldwin, Pratyajit Mohapatra, Monica Nagalla, Rhea Sindvani, Desiree Amaya, Hope A Dickson, Karen Menuz

Department of Medicine Faculty Papers

Degrading Enzymes (ODEs). However, their contribution to olfactory signaling in vivo is poorly understood. This is due in part to the challenge of identifying which of the dozens of antennal-expressed CYPs might inactivate a given odorant. Here, we tested a high-throughput deorphanization strategy in Drosophila to identify CYPs that are transcriptionally induced by exposure to odorants. We discovered three CYPs selectively upregulated by geranyl acetate using transcriptional profiling. Although these CYPs are broadly expressed in the antenna in non-neuronal cells, electrophysiological recordings from CYP mutants did not reveal any changes in olfactory neuron responses to this odorant. Neurons were desensitized …


Role Of Emotional Intelligence In Job Performance Of Healthcare Providers Working In Public Sector Hospitals Of Pakistan, Nimra Zaman, Khalida Naz Memon, Faryal Zaman, Komal Zaman Khan, Shazia Rahman Shaikh 2021 LIAQUAT UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES, DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES, JAMSHORO, PAKISTAN

Role Of Emotional Intelligence In Job Performance Of Healthcare Providers Working In Public Sector Hospitals Of Pakistan, Nimra Zaman, Khalida Naz Memon, Faryal Zaman, Komal Zaman Khan, Shazia Rahman Shaikh

Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences

Objective. To determine the association between emotional intelligence (EI) and job performance (JP) of health care providers (HCPs). Methods. Healthcare professionals from various hospitals were chosen for a cross-sectional study. The survey was conducted using a three-part questionnaire including the demographic profile, Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence (EI) Scale, and an individual work performance (JP) questionnaire. The relationship of predictor variables on JP was sought by applying Chi-square test and multiple regression analysis. Results. About 43.3% of the 50.8% of participants who scored well on the EI scale also scored high on the JP scales. The remaining …


Understanding The Effect Of Dietary Palmitic Acid On Glycolysis During Innate Immune Memory In Macrophages, Khaleda A. Aqaei 2021 Portland State University

Understanding The Effect Of Dietary Palmitic Acid On Glycolysis During Innate Immune Memory In Macrophages, Khaleda A. Aqaei

University Honors Theses

Trained immunity is long-term innate immune memory induced by a primary stimulus, which leads to hyper-inflammation upon secondary stimulation with a homologous or heterologous ligand. Trained immunity is mediated by epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming of the target cell and leads to modification of gene expression and cellular function. Classically, trained immunity is initiated by β-glucans, an inflammatory molecule found on the exterior of fungal species. Interestingly, our lab has recently described that dietary fatty acids can initiate trained immunity, working through similar pathways as β-glucans. Specifically, our data show that a pre-treatment with a specific dietary saturated fatty acid (SFA), …


Placenta-Specific Slc38a2/Snat2 Knockdown Causes Fetal Growth Restriction In Mice, Owen R. Vaughan, Katarzyna Maksym, Elena Silva, Kenneth Barentsen, Russel V. Anthony, Sara L. Hillman, Thomas L. Brown, Rebecca Spencer, Anna L. David, Fredrick J. Rosario, Theresa L. Powell, Thomas Jansson 2021 Wright State University - Main Campus

Placenta-Specific Slc38a2/Snat2 Knockdown Causes Fetal Growth Restriction In Mice, Owen R. Vaughan, Katarzyna Maksym, Elena Silva, Kenneth Barentsen, Russel V. Anthony, Sara L. Hillman, Thomas L. Brown, Rebecca Spencer, Anna L. David, Fredrick J. Rosario, Theresa L. Powell, Thomas Jansson

Neuroscience, Cell Biology & Physiology Faculty Publications

Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a complication of pregnancy that reduces birth weight, markedly increases infant mortality and morbidity and is associated with later-life cardiometabolic disease. No specific treatment is available for FGR. Placentas of human FGR infants have low abundance of sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (Slc38a2/SNAT2), which supplies the fetus with amino acids required for growth. We determined the mechanistic role of placental Slc38a2/SNAT2 deficiency in the development of restricted fetal growth, hypothesizing that placenta-specific Slc38a2 knockdown causes FGR in mice. Using lentiviral transduction of blastocysts with a small hairpin RNA (shRNA), we achieved 59% knockdown of …


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (Covid-19): Multisystem Review Of Pathophysiology, Tanveer Mir, Talal Almas, Jasmeet Kaur, Mohammed Faisaluddin, David Song, Waqas Ullah, Sahil Mamtani, Hiba Rauf, Sunita Yadav, Sharaad Latchana, Nara Miriam Michaelson, Michael Connerney, Yasar Sattar 2021 Wayne State University

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (Covid-19): Multisystem Review Of Pathophysiology, Tanveer Mir, Talal Almas, Jasmeet Kaur, Mohammed Faisaluddin, David Song, Waqas Ullah, Sahil Mamtani, Hiba Rauf, Sunita Yadav, Sharaad Latchana, Nara Miriam Michaelson, Michael Connerney, Yasar Sattar

Division of Internal Medicine Faculty Papers & Presentations

Abstract Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic is associated with high morbidity and mortality. COVID-19, which is caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS CoV-2), affects multiple organ systems through a myriad of mechanisms. Afflicted patients present with a vast constellation of symptoms, from asymptomatic disease to life-threatening complications. The most common manifestations pertain to mild pulmonary symptoms, which can progress to respiratory distress syndrome and venous thromboembolism. However, in patients with renal failure, life-threatening cardiac abnormalities can ensue. Various mechanisms such as viral entry through Angiotensin receptor (ACE) affecting multiple organs and thus releasing pro-inflammatory markers have been postulated. …


The Effects Of Estrogen In The Glucoregulatory Response To Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes, Mitchell James Sammut 2021 Western University

The Effects Of Estrogen In The Glucoregulatory Response To Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes, Mitchell James Sammut

Undergraduate Student Research Internships Conference

Regular exercise has shown to benefit the health of individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, a barrier to regular exercise for this population is the fear of low blood glucose (BG) levels, also known as hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can result in short and long-term side-effects, such as recurring loss of consciousness or in severe cases death.

In non-diabetics, sex-related differences in fuel selection during exercise are well established. Women shift towards using fats as fuel whereas men rely mostly on sugars (i.e., carbohydrates) for energy production. Exercise during the luteal phase of the female menstrual cycle, where estrogen levels …


Point Substitutions In G Protein-Coupled Receptors, Jessica Brown 2021 Western University

Point Substitutions In G Protein-Coupled Receptors, Jessica Brown

Undergraduate Student Research Internships Conference

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are proteins that are important in physiological regulatory processes within the body, and for this reason are important drug targets. When bound to an agonist, such as neurotransmitters or hormones, the receptor adopts an active state to allow these biochemical pathways to occur. However, mutations can arise within the receptor that affect its ability to bind its agonist. This natural variation found within the genome can make it difficult to design pharmaceuticals to target the receptors.

To see the effects of these point substitutions on agonist-induced receptor activation, mutations were made within a negative allosteric site …


A Distinct Difference Between Air And Mucosal Temperatures In Human Respiratory Tract, Mehdi Khosravi, Ruei-Lung Lin, Ashish P. Maskey, Subodh Pandey, An-Hsuan Lin, Lu-Yuan Lee 2021 University of Kentucky

A Distinct Difference Between Air And Mucosal Temperatures In Human Respiratory Tract, Mehdi Khosravi, Ruei-Lung Lin, Ashish P. Maskey, Subodh Pandey, An-Hsuan Lin, Lu-Yuan Lee

Internal Medicine Faculty Publications

xtensive evidence indicates that several types of temperature-sensitive ion channels are abundantly expressed in the sensory nerves innervating airway mucosa. Indeed, airway temperature is known to play an important role in regulating respiratory functions. However, the actual airway mucosal temperature and its dynamic changes during the respiratory cycle have not been directly measured. In previous studies, airway tissue temperature was often estimated by indirect measurement of the peak exhaled breath temperature (PEBT). In view of the poor thermal conductivity of air, we believe that the airway tissue temperature cannot be accurately determined by the exhaled air temperature, and this study …


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