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Nervous System Diseases Commons

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Survival And Prognostic Factors In Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancers And Brain Metastases: Have We Made Progress?, Minesh Mehta 2019 Baptist Health Medical Group; Miami Cancer Institute

Survival And Prognostic Factors In Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancers And Brain Metastases: Have We Made Progress?, Minesh Mehta

Minesh Mehta

No abstract provided.


Management Of Patients With Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer And Adverse Prognostic Features: Multi-National Radiation Treatment Recommendations Are Heterogeneous, Minesh Mehta 2019 Baptist Health Medical Group; Miami Cancer Institute

Management Of Patients With Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer And Adverse Prognostic Features: Multi-National Radiation Treatment Recommendations Are Heterogeneous, Minesh Mehta

Minesh Mehta

No abstract provided.


The Association Between Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Reactivation And Alzheimer’S Disease, Andrew Allee 2019 Lincoln University, Jefferson City Missouri

The Association Between Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Reactivation And Alzheimer’S Disease, Andrew Allee

BIO 410 Spring 2019 Research Papers

This review will focus on the interaction of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and its causative role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) noting specifically, the epidemiological relevance of addressing this problem, as well as the molecular pathways associated. HSV-1 reactivation tends to be one of the primary causative events that is responsible for many of the pathologies associated with AD, such as: amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation caused by malfunctioning cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as tau hyperphosphorylation. HSV-1 reactivation is a primary causative event in downstream dysfunction and is also shown to be directed ...


Assessment Of Motor Function, Motor Learning, & Olivary Climbing Fiber Distribution Within Developmental Hyperserotonemia Rat Model For Autism Spectrum Disorder, Elizabeth Diane Holland 2019 Missouri State University

Assessment Of Motor Function, Motor Learning, & Olivary Climbing Fiber Distribution Within Developmental Hyperserotonemia Rat Model For Autism Spectrum Disorder, Elizabeth Diane Holland

MSU Graduate Theses

While Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is defined by deficits in social communication, compromised motor function and motor learning have been increasingly reported. Motor deficits could compound social impairment through delayed language acquisition, reduced opportunity for social interaction, and affected nonverbal communication. One area of interest in the investigation of motor dysfunction is the cerebellum, where altered cerebellar structure and connectivity have been reported in those diagnosed with ASD. Morphological and functional changes in cerebellar circuitry could disrupt motor skill development and may be associated with developmental alterations of the serotonergic system. Elevated blood serotonin in perinatal development, developmental hyperserotonemia (DHS ...


Vile Blood: Hereditary Degeneracy In Victorian England, Dalton Lee Brock 2019 Arkansas Tech University

Vile Blood: Hereditary Degeneracy In Victorian England, Dalton Lee Brock

Theses and Dissertations from 2019

During the late 1800s, the people of England grew anxious about hereditary degeneracy. That anxiety was rooted in the medical literature of the Victorian period. Nature predetermined individuals to be either healthy or unhealthy. Unhealthy individuals were marked by degenerative mental or physical characteristics such as epilepsy. Medical professionals, including Henry Maudsley, emphasized reversion and its hereditary nature as a threat to individuals and society. All based their works and arguments on Charles Darwin’s idea of inheritance. Darwin, in turn, had adopted and modified Lamarckian inheritance to make up for the absence of an inheritance principle in his theory ...


Gigantic Stomach: A Rare Manifestation Of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Amaninder Dhaliwal, Sarvani Madiraju, Banreet S. Dhindsa, Getaw W. Hassen, Fedja A. Rochling 2019 University of Nebraska Medical Center

Gigantic Stomach: A Rare Manifestation Of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Amaninder Dhaliwal, Sarvani Madiraju, Banreet S. Dhindsa, Getaw W. Hassen, Fedja A. Rochling

School of Medicine Faculty Publications

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by degeneration and atrophy of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles after a latent period of apparently normal development and function. The gastrointestinal manifestations start in the second decade of life and are mainly due to atrophy of smooth muscle layers. Refractory gastroparesis and chronic constipation can lead to severe gastric and small bowel dilatation, which can be life threatening. Here, we present a case of a 21-year-old male with a gigantic stomach secondary to DMD resolved with conservative management and no surgical intervention.


An Integrative Approach To Mindfulness-Based Symptom Management For Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lisa Barer 2019 Lesley University

An Integrative Approach To Mindfulness-Based Symptom Management For Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lisa Barer

Mindfulness Studies Theses

Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a chronic health condition; its etiology is poorly understood, and treatment options are limited to management of symptoms. Current recommended treatment options are controversial, and evidence of effectiveness is limited. This paper proposes a novel model for symptom management of ME/CFS using mindfulness-based interventions, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and relaxation techniques. A comprehensive review of available evidence is used to support this approach. The idea is that, working synergistically, these three approaches, grounded by mindfulness-based principles, can address many of the symptoms of the illness and help patients better cope and ...


Neuroblastoma In Adolescents And Children Older Than 10 Years: Unusual Clinicopathologic And Biologic Features, Laura McCarthy, Katherine Chastain, Terrie Flatt, Eugenio Taboada, Robert E. Garola, John Herriges, Linda D. Cooley, Atif Ahmed 2019 Children's Mercy Hospital

Neuroblastoma In Adolescents And Children Older Than 10 Years: Unusual Clinicopathologic And Biologic Features, Laura Mccarthy, Katherine Chastain, Terrie Flatt, Eugenio Taboada, Robert E. Garola, John Herriges, Linda D. Cooley, Atif Ahmed

Posters

This poster describes four cases of neuroblastoma diagnosed since 2008 in children greater than 10 years and presents their clinical, histologic and biologic features, emphasizing unusual clinicopathologic characteristics and the role of DNA microarray analysis and Next Generation Sequencing in their management.


Sleep And Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction In Alzheimer’S Disease, Sarah G Bridgeman 2019 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Sleep And Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction In Alzheimer’S Disease, Sarah G Bridgeman

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


The 5-Ht1a-R Knockout Mouse As A Model Of Later Life Anxiety Disorders: Implications For Sex Differences, Tatyana Budylin 2019 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

The 5-Ht1a-R Knockout Mouse As A Model Of Later Life Anxiety Disorders: Implications For Sex Differences, Tatyana Budylin

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Anxiety affects nearly twice as many women as it affects men across all cultures and economic groups. Importantly, girls have a higher chance of inheriting anxiety disorders than boys, and many anxiety disorders appear at a very young age. However, little is known about sex differences in brain and behavioral development and how they relate to anxiety in adulthood. Serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) mediated signaling has been implicated in depression and anxiety, however most studies that focus on the involvement of the 5-HT1A-R have been conducted in adults. Little is known about how the 5-HT1A ...


The Effect Of Cysteine-Reactive Catechol Antioxidants On Alcohol Dehydrogenase As A Model For Oxidative Stress In Neurodegenerative Disease, Rachel Smith 2019 William & Mary

The Effect Of Cysteine-Reactive Catechol Antioxidants On Alcohol Dehydrogenase As A Model For Oxidative Stress In Neurodegenerative Disease, Rachel Smith

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The cellular mechanisms underlying age-related neurodegeneration, especially in disease states, are poorly understood. Oxidative stress has been heavily implicated as one factor both produced by and contributing to the progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. In particular, it can destroy a cell’s ability to produce energy through aerobic and anaerobic respiration, thus leading to the death of individual cells and brain tissues as a whole. This study focuses on the relationship between oxidative stress and energy production in disease states. In particular, we examine the ability of catechol molecules to take on pro-oxidative properties and modify ...


Inclusion Body Myositis, Sreelakshmi Panginikkod, Rina Musa 2019 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Inclusion Body Myositis, Sreelakshmi Panginikkod, Rina Musa

Open Access Articles

Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most common subtype of autoimmune myopathy in patients older than the age of 50 years. Several diagnostic criteria have been proposed for IBM based on expert opinion and consensus groups. Their use in clinical practice is however limited due to low sensitivity. The European Neuromuscular Centre (ENMC) 2011 clinically defined diagnostic criteria have a high specificity of greater than 99% to diagnose IBM, but like other criteria, its sensitivity is low at 57%. ENMC 2011 Inclusion Body Myositis Diagnostic Criteria Mandatory Features: 1. Age of onset later than 45 years. 2. Duration of symptoms ...


Uhthoff Phenomenon, Sreelakshmi Panginikkod, Lokesh A.. Rukmangadachar 2019 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Uhthoff Phenomenon, Sreelakshmi Panginikkod, Lokesh A.. Rukmangadachar

Open Access Articles

Uhthoff's phenomenon (also known as Uhthoff sign or Uhthoff syndrome) is described as temporary, short-lived (less than 24 hours) and stereotyped worsening of neurological function among multiple sclerosis patients in response to increases in core body temperature. This phenomenon is named after Wilhelm Uhthoff, a German ophthalmologist who described it. In 1890, Uhthoff first described exercise-induced amblyopia in multiple sclerosis patients. In 1961, this phenomenon was given his surname, Uhthoff's Phenomenon (UP), by G. Ricklefs[1]. In four out of 100 MS patients, Uhthoff observed the appearance of reversible optic symptoms induced by an increase in body temperature ...


Male Determining Gene Nix May Bring An End To Transmission Of Diseases Through Mosquitoes, Mohammed Mahdi 2019 University of Southern Maine

Male Determining Gene Nix May Bring An End To Transmission Of Diseases Through Mosquitoes, Mohammed Mahdi

Thinking Matters Symposium

Female mosquitoes take blood from humans to gain protein needed to produce eggs, and in the process they can transmit viruses, such as Zika, Dengue, and chikungunya, or parasites, such as malaria. Male mosquitoes do not transmit diseases. This literature review will examine what is known about how sex is determined in mosquitoes and how this can be used to manipulate the females that spread diseases to humans. Using CRISPR Cas9, the lab of Zhijian Tu removed the Nix gene from mosquito embryos; all of these were feminized. Ectopic overexpression of Nix gene product in mosquito embryos caused even genetically ...


Headaches In Athletes, Michael Swartzon 2019 Doctors Hospital; Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

Headaches In Athletes, Michael Swartzon

Michael Swartzon

No abstract provided.


Optimization Of Ribosome Profiling Using Low-Input Brain Tissue From Fragile X Syndrome Model Mice, Botao Liu, Gemma Molinaro, Huan Shu, Emily E. Stackpole, Kimberly M. Huber, Joel D. Richter 2019 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Optimization Of Ribosome Profiling Using Low-Input Brain Tissue From Fragile X Syndrome Model Mice, Botao Liu, Gemma Molinaro, Huan Shu, Emily E. Stackpole, Kimberly M. Huber, Joel D. Richter

Open Access Articles

Dysregulated protein synthesis is a major underlying cause of many neurodevelopmental diseases including fragile X syndrome. In order to capture subtle but biologically significant differences in translation in these disorders, a robust technique is required. One powerful tool to study translational control is ribosome profiling, which is based on deep sequencing of mRNA fragments protected from ribonuclease (RNase) digestion by ribosomes. However, this approach has been mainly applied to rapidly dividing cells where translation is active and large amounts of starting material are readily available. The application of ribosome profiling to low-input brain tissue where translation is modest and gene ...


Systematic Literature Review Of Quetiapine For The Treatment Of Psychosis In Patients With Parkinsonism, Jack J. Chen, Henry Hua, Lilian Massihi, Ivan Portillo, Azita Alipour, William Ondo, Khashayar Dashtipour 2019 American University of Health Sciences

Systematic Literature Review Of Quetiapine For The Treatment Of Psychosis In Patients With Parkinsonism, Jack J. Chen, Henry Hua, Lilian Massihi, Ivan Portillo, Azita Alipour, William Ondo, Khashayar Dashtipour

Library Articles and Research

Objective:

The purpose of this article was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of quetiapine compared with placebo or other interventions for psychosis in parkinsonism.

Methods:

Participants with a diagnosis of parkinsonism participated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy and tolerability of quetiapine for psychotic symptoms within a defined follow-up period. The authors conducted searches on PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials, and EMBASE for articles published from January 1991 to October 2017. Study methodology and patient- and treatment-level data were independently extracted and summarized by using descriptive statistics. Studies underwent quality assessment for risk of bias.

Results ...


Correction Of Pseudoexon Splicing Caused By A Novel Intronic Dysferlin Mutation, Janice A. Dominov, Ozgun Uyan, Diane McKenna-Yasek, Babi Ramesh Reddy Nallamilli, Virginie Kergourlay, Marc Bartoli, Nicolas Levy, Judith Hudson, Teresinha Evangelista, Hanns Lochmuller, Martin Krahn, Laura Rufibach, Madhuri Hegde, Robert H. Brown Jr. 2019 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Correction Of Pseudoexon Splicing Caused By A Novel Intronic Dysferlin Mutation, Janice A. Dominov, Ozgun Uyan, Diane Mckenna-Yasek, Babi Ramesh Reddy Nallamilli, Virginie Kergourlay, Marc Bartoli, Nicolas Levy, Judith Hudson, Teresinha Evangelista, Hanns Lochmuller, Martin Krahn, Laura Rufibach, Madhuri Hegde, Robert H. Brown Jr.

Open Access Articles

Objective: Dysferlin is a large transmembrane protein that functions in critical processes of membrane repair and vesicle fusion. Dysferlin-deficiency due to mutations in the dysferlin gene leads to muscular dystrophy (Miyoshi myopathy (MM), limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B), distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset (DMAT)), typically with early adult onset. At least 416 pathogenic dysferlin mutations are known, but for approximately 17% of patients, one or both of their pathogenic variants remain undefined following standard exon sequencing methods that interrogate exons and nearby flanking intronic regions but not the majority of intronic regions.

Methods: We sequenced RNA from ...


Investigating The Role Of Free Radicals In Huntington's Disease Using Drosophila Melanogaster, Jennifer Libov 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Investigating The Role Of Free Radicals In Huntington's Disease Using Drosophila Melanogaster, Jennifer Libov

Honors Theses, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

During normal cell metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as a byproduct of oxidative phosphorylation. ROS are utilized in the cell as a signaling molecule and can be maintained at healthy levels by cellular antioxidants. However, when the cell experiences oxidative stress due to environmental or genetic conditions, levels of ROS can exceed healthy levels and inhibit necessary life functions by damaging biomolecules and cellular structures. This loss of function can lead to physiological decline and neurodegeneration, such as in diseases like Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and, potentially, Huntington’s disease. The following experiments use the model ...


Delayed Recognition Of Acute Stroke By Emergency Department Staff Following Failure To Activate Stroke By Emergency Medical Services, Joseph Tennyson, Sean S. Michael, Marguerite N. Youngren, Martin A. Reznek 2019 University of Massachusetts Medical School

Delayed Recognition Of Acute Stroke By Emergency Department Staff Following Failure To Activate Stroke By Emergency Medical Services, Joseph Tennyson, Sean S. Michael, Marguerite N. Youngren, Martin A. Reznek

Open Access Articles

Introduction: Early recognition and pre-notification by emergency medical services (EMS) improves the timeliness of emergency department (ED) stroke care; however, little is known regarding the effects on care should EMS providers fail to pre-notify. We sought to determine if potential stroke patients transported by EMS, but for whom EMS did not provide pre-notification, suffer delays in ED door-to-stroke-team activation (DTA) as compared to the other available cohort of patients for whom the ED is not pre-notified-those arriving by private vehicle.

Methods: We queried our prospective stroke registry to identify consecutive stroke team activation patients over 12 months and retrospectively reviewed ...


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