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Exploring The Relationships Of Power, Attitudes Regarding Intermittent Fetal Monitoring, And Perceived Barriers To Research Utilization With A Labor And Delivery Nurse's Attitude Toward Patient Advocacy, Lisa Heelan 2015 Seton Hall University

Exploring The Relationships Of Power, Attitudes Regarding Intermittent Fetal Monitoring, And Perceived Barriers To Research Utilization With A Labor And Delivery Nurse's Attitude Toward Patient Advocacy, Lisa Heelan

Seton Hall University Dissertations and Theses (ETDs)

A problem identified in nursing practice was the routine use of continuous fetal monitoring (CEFM) with low risk laboring women. CEFM is associated with worsened outcomes for the low risk laboring woman with no benefit to the newborn. In addition, this routine practice does not allow most laboring women the right to make an informed choice regarding treatment options. Nursing includes the role of patient advocacy. There was a need to better understand what is associated with a labor and delivery nurse’s attitude toward patient advocacy.

This descriptive correlational research design examined the relationships of power as knowing participation ...


Euthyphro’S Dilemma And Divine Command Ethics, Charis Steffel 2015 Cedarville University

Euthyphro’S Dilemma And Divine Command Ethics, Charis Steffel

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

Euthyphro, one of the Greek philosopher Plato’s earliest dialogues (about 380 B.C.), presents a dilemma that has troubled philosophers and theologians for centuries. The quandary is provoked by an assertion Euthyphro makes about piety in conversation with Socrates. Euthyphro is planning to prosecute his father for an unintentional murder to avoid being associated with him. He hopes that this will help his standing with the gods. Socrates shows great surprise at Euthyphro’s apparent knowledge of “religion and things pious and impious.” This leads to a discussion concerning the nature of piety, where Euthyphro proposes that whatever is ...


Pope Paul Vi And The Pill, Sara White 2015 Cedarville University

Pope Paul Vi And The Pill, Sara White

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

The Roman Catholic Church has strong moral rules opposing the use of oral contraceptives. The Church still holds the view that a “sexual union must always allow for the possibility of procreation” (Sullivan, 2006, p.1). Pope Paul VI, in his encyclical Humanae Vitae in 1968, stated that that the use of contraceptives was a sin against God. In this paper, I will present the views of Pope Paul VI from this encyclical, then present arguments against his claim that using them violates God’s law.


Abortion And The Link To Breast Cancer, Jennifer Heiden 2015 Cedarville University

Abortion And The Link To Breast Cancer, Jennifer Heiden

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

“It is only reasonable to conclude, from all extant evidence, that induced abortion is indeed a risk factor for breast cancer, despite the strong and pervasive bias in the recent literature in the direction of viewing abortion as safe for women.” So states Joel Brind, in a landmark review of the evidence for the abortion - breast cancer (ABC) link (2005, p. 110). Over the last forty years, this issue has been an intriguing topic of research, for both scientific and ideological reasons. But what can we conclude from the published studies currently available? According to a comprehensive meta-analysis by Beral ...


If Kevorkian Could Meet Hippocrates, Scott Van Dyke 2015 Cedarville University

If Kevorkian Could Meet Hippocrates, Scott Van Dyke

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

No abstract provided.


The Pro-Child Movement: Adopting A Compassionate Strategy, Jessica Seman 2015 Cedarville University

The Pro-Child Movement: Adopting A Compassionate Strategy, Jessica Seman

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

In vitro fertilization (IVF) has become the most common assisted reproductive technique in the United States, accounting for 48,000 births in one recent year alone. This has also given birth to a silent generation of over 500,000 human embryos, waiting in cryopreservation for their chance at birth (Grabill, 2006). For the Christian who believes that conception marks the beginning of human life, the fact of half a million frozen persons creates an ethical challenge of enormous proportion. Besides the obvious solution of not contributing to the problem (by freezing or discarding one’s own embryos), embryo adoption is ...


Roe V. House: A Dialogue On Abortion, Katie Condit 2015 Cedarville University

Roe V. House: A Dialogue On Abortion, Katie Condit

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

No abstract provided.


Substance, Nature, And Human Personhood, John Wildman 2015 Cedarville University

Substance, Nature, And Human Personhood, John Wildman

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

What is a person? The answer to this foundational question may seem intuitive at the first glance. Many would respond, without much thought, that a person is a human being. However, proponents of empirical functionalist philosophy contend that personhood is based on the ability to perform certain actions in actual, not potential, form. They would therefore claim that some members of species homo sapiens may not actually be persons (Singer, 1985). To understand when personhood begins, it is first necessary to understand what a person is. This paper will apply the Aristotelian concepts of substance and nature to define person ...


Embryo Adoption: An Opportunity For Life, Carla Gaines 2015 Cedarville University

Embryo Adoption: An Opportunity For Life, Carla Gaines

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

The world began a new revolution during the second half of the twentieth century. This revolution centered not on industry, but on biotechnology. Researchers unlocked the mysteries of procreation and genetics. The promise of science seduced common sense about the value of human life. Postmodern pluralism embraced the modernist idea of utopia through technology at the cost of the helpless.

Yet civilization is no closer to utopia than it was 50 years ago. Instead, we debate a whole host of new ethical dilemmas. Several debates focus on the creation, storage and eventual destiny of millions of human embryos. Hundreds of ...


The Logic Of Birth Control: A Look At The Numbers, Lydia Wong 2015 Cedarville University

The Logic Of Birth Control: A Look At The Numbers, Lydia Wong

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

If personhood begins at the moment of conception, the failure of an embryo to implant results in the death of a person. Therefore, many in the pro-life community worry about the ethics of using oral contraceptives, if such hormonal birth control actually interferes with implantation (a so-called “abortifacient” effect). Obviously killing is wrong, and death should be avoided. However, even if contraceptives occasionally prevent implantation, a very good case can still be made in favor of their use. This paper seeks to show how contraceptives, even if they cause implantation failure, can be used with a clear conscience.

Life is ...


Human Personhood From A Kantian Perspective, Jennifer Nelson 2015 Cedarville University

Human Personhood From A Kantian Perspective, Jennifer Nelson

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

What sets humans apart from all other creatures? If you were to approach a biological Homo sapiens with the question “what makes you human?” how would they respond? Do we have value simply as humans, or are we nothing more than what we offer the world? Philosophers have discussed these questions for centuries and it seems that there have been a few concrete conclusions. These conclusions depend on how one views ethical theory.

Ethical theory and personhood go hand-in-hand. Immanuel Kant, one of the greatest philosophers of the 18th Century, developed his moral philosophy in what is now known as ...


An Internal Ethical Revolution, Hillary Jones 2015 Cedarville University

An Internal Ethical Revolution, Hillary Jones

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

Despite legislation to protect individuals from slavery and forced prostitution, many continue treating people as property. The Fourteenth Amendment states that persons have the right to “life, liberty, and property,” and U.S. society has never regarded persons as property. Unfortunately, some ethics do not consider all human beings as persons. Personhood denotes being a member of the “moral community.” I base personhood on an ontological perspective, meaning that all human beings are human persons. I also believe that there is no such thing as a “potential person” or a “human non-person” regardless of disability, race, ethnicity, gender or any ...


Tubman Versus Hodgson: A Conversation About Abortion, Nicole Brewin 2015 Cedarville University

Tubman Versus Hodgson: A Conversation About Abortion, Nicole Brewin

CedarEthics: A Journal of Critical Thinking in Bioethics

No abstract provided.


A Consideration Of International Surrogacy Under Act-Utilitarian Ethics, Rosa Dale-Moore 2015 University of Puget Sound

A Consideration Of International Surrogacy Under Act-Utilitarian Ethics, Rosa Dale-Moore

Sound Decisions: An Undergraduate Bioethics Journal

Surrogacy is the practice of a woman who gestates a fetus for another person or couple. Through a contracted agreement, the surrogate gives up the child to this person or couple, who then adopt the baby. Surrogacy companies in other countries than the United States, especially India, has become very prevalent and successful. The surrogates conceivably earn much more money than they ever could at their permanent jobs, as well as often receiving housing and healthcare during and/or after their pregnancy. From a utilitarian point of view, international surrogacy is generally morally permissible because there are many more benefits ...


Protecting Patients’ Autonomy: Supporting The “Right To Die”, Nick Lyon 2015 University of Puget Sound

Protecting Patients’ Autonomy: Supporting The “Right To Die”, Nick Lyon

Sound Decisions: An Undergraduate Bioethics Journal

Due to the intrinsically subjective nature of such complaints from a patient, the critical factor to be considered in the ethics of requests to die will be how the patient views their suffering and quality of life, not the observations of third parties. In this essay I will argue that if a patient makes a considered request to die rather than suffer prolonged physical or mental agony, then those who have the capability to do so should honor that request. I further argue that such an action is entirely morally justifiable. For the purposes of this essay I will use ...


Who’S Still Missing: Arguments For The Inclusion Of Undocumented Immigrants In Universal Healthcare, Alix Melton 2015 University of Puget Sound

Who’S Still Missing: Arguments For The Inclusion Of Undocumented Immigrants In Universal Healthcare, Alix Melton

Sound Decisions: An Undergraduate Bioethics Journal

There are many arguments that have been deployed to argue for the inclusion of immigrants in the Affordable Care Act. The first, the “effortful immigrant frame,” argues that immigrants generally come to the United States for work and often take up employment in hard labor jobs with unsafe working conditions—jobs that most U.S. citizens do not in fact want. Based on their contributions to society, proponents of this viewpoint offer, they ought to qualify for health benefits. A second, and similar, frame is the injustice frame, which offers that undocumented immigrants are a victimized group and should be ...


Is Euthanasia Morally Permissible? Why Or Why Not?, Rae Nathan 2015 University of Puget Sound

Is Euthanasia Morally Permissible? Why Or Why Not?, Rae Nathan

Sound Decisions: An Undergraduate Bioethics Journal

When understanding a specific case in bioethics, it is important to acknowledge four basic bioethical principles: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. These four principles are crucial to understanding, and devising a solution, for a case but certain principles are given more weight than others on a case-by-case determination. The principles guide particular cases, but are open to adjustment. In the biomedical issue of euthanasia pertaining to terminally ill consenting individuals, the most relevant bioethical principles are autonomy and beneficence. My argument is twofold: (1) Both active and passive euthanasia are morally permissible because the ability for patients to have this ...


Ethics Of Ebola Quarantines, Aaron Pomerantz 2015 University of Puget Sound

Ethics Of Ebola Quarantines, Aaron Pomerantz

Sound Decisions: An Undergraduate Bioethics Journal

The current outbreak of EVD has reached major cities, rather than just small, isolated villages. With this increased access to a far greater population of people, letting the disease burn itself out is no longer an option. By forcing cordon sanitaires, Public Health officials run an incredibly high ethical risk, which must be acknowledged, regardless of the danger posed to communities. If countries, NGO’s and the WHO can ensure that the basic needs of those who are caught in forced quarantines are met, then these methods may work. However, if these needs are not met, major ethical issues arise ...


One Final Goodbye, Dennis Baumgardner 2015 bepress (DC Admins)

One Final Goodbye, Dennis Baumgardner

Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews

N/A


Statins And Kidney Failure, Rebekah Pemberton 2015 Liberty University

Statins And Kidney Failure, Rebekah Pemberton

Senior Honors Theses

Use of the HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, also known as statins, in patients with renal dysfunction is laden with controversy. Studies on statin use in renal patients have given varying reports. Some research has indicated that these medications may exacerbate existing renal dysfunction and induce further progression of renal disease. Furthermore, some researchers have suggested statins may actually cause some cases of renal dysfunction through the effects of rhabdomyolysis, acute interstitial nephritis, or necrotizing immune-mediated myopathy, while other researchers have asserted that the statins can have nephroprotective effects. The use of statins is believed to be ineffective in patients who are ...


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