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Bioethics and Medical Ethics Commons

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Teaching Healthcare Ethics Students How To Cope With Gun Violence, Peter G. Holub 2018 Nova Southeastern University

Teaching Healthcare Ethics Students How To Cope With Gun Violence, Peter G. Holub

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Buchbinder (2017) provides assignments for Financial Management, Epidemiology, Health Policy, Leadership, and Human Resources classes to help students process the physical and emotional effects of gun violence in America. The following additional assignments are provided for bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral level Medical Ethics classes.


Richard Lewontin And The Argument From Ethos, David J. Depew 2018 University of Iowa

Richard Lewontin And The Argument From Ethos, David J. Depew

Poroi

This essay uses rhetorical analysis to defend the population geneticist Richard Lewontin from accusations made by E. O. Wilson and others that his Marxist social philosophy distorts his empirical science. I suggest that Lewontin’s appeal to his own authority as an experimental evolutionary biologist supports his claim that racism has no biological justification and that it is his opponents whose assumptions about society distort their scientific arguments.


Book Review: Surrogacy: A Human Rights Violation By Renate Klein, Kate Rose 2018 Dare To Tell

Book Review: Surrogacy: A Human Rights Violation By Renate Klein, Kate Rose

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


If We Allow Football Players And Boxers To Be Paid For Entertaining The Public, Why Don't We Allow Kidney Donors To Be Paid For Saving Lives?, Philip J. Cook, Kimberly D. Krawiec 2018 Duke Law School

If We Allow Football Players And Boxers To Be Paid For Entertaining The Public, Why Don't We Allow Kidney Donors To Be Paid For Saving Lives?, Philip J. Cook, Kimberly D. Krawiec

Faculty Scholarship

We contrast the compensation ban on organ donation with the legal treatment of football, boxing, and other violent sports where both acute and chronic injuries to participants are common. Our claim is that there is a stronger case for compensating kidney donors than for compensating participants in violent sports. If this proposition is accepted, one implication is that there are only three logically consistent positions: allow compensation for both kidney donation and for violent sports; allow compensation for kidney donation but not for violent sports; or allow compensation for neither. Our current law and practice is perverse in endorsing a ...


Depression: The Often Overlooked Sequela Of Head Trauma, Samuel D. Hodge Jr., Jack E. Hubbard 2017 Temple University

Depression: The Often Overlooked Sequela Of Head Trauma, Samuel D. Hodge Jr., Jack E. Hubbard

Cleveland State Law Review

Depression is a common sequela of head trauma. Approximately half of all individuals with a cranial injury will experience depression within the first year, regardless of the severity of the injury. The ailment is characterized clinically as a mood disorder, often associated with intense feelings of sadness. However, depression is more complex than mood disorders, as many mental and bodily complaints—such as insomnia, fatigue, anxiety, appetite changes, aches and pains, and lack of interest in previously enjoyable activities—are associated with depression. These intense feelings, particularly when combined with despair and hopelessness, can lead to suicide, a dreaded potential ...


The Italian Agreement Between The Government And The Regional Authorities: National Guidelines For Aai And Institutional Context, Martina Simonato, Marta De Santis, Laura Contalbrigo, Daniele Benedetti, Elisabetta Finocchi Mahne, Vincenzo Ugo Santucci, Silvio Borrello, Luca Farina 2017 Italian National Reference Centre for Animal Assisted Interventions

The Italian Agreement Between The Government And The Regional Authorities: National Guidelines For Aai And Institutional Context, Martina Simonato, Marta De Santis, Laura Contalbrigo, Daniele Benedetti, Elisabetta Finocchi Mahne, Vincenzo Ugo Santucci, Silvio Borrello, Luca Farina

People and Animals: The International Journal of Research and Practice

Animal-assisted interventions (AAI) have developed considerably in the last half century, prompting various private and public realities dealing with AAI worldwide to work on and establish standards and best practice. However, AAI are still far from being regulated harmoniously. In this context, Italy offers a unique example at world level: here the spread of AAI has set in motion an ethical and legal reflection that led to the creation of the Italian National Reference Centre for AAI (NRC AAI) by ministerial decree in 2009 and the approval of National Guidelines for AAI in 2015. The Italian legislation on AAI is ...


Autonomy And Patient Care: To What Extent Should Children Make Their Own Decisions?, Heather G. Kuruvilla 2017 Cedarville University

Autonomy And Patient Care: To What Extent Should Children Make Their Own Decisions?, Heather G. Kuruvilla

Heather G. Kuruvilla, Ph.D.

On June 14, 2016, 5-year old Julianna Snow died at home, in accordance with her stated wishes not to return to the hospital. Julianna suffered from a severe form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, an inherited neurodegenerative disorder which, while not always lethal,1 had weakened her body to the extent that even a cold could be fatal. Julianna’s case raises important questions about patient autonomy and end-of-life care for children. The child did not wish to return to the hospital, and was willing to go to heaven instead.6 Though her parents respected her autonomy and honored her decision, the ...


Why American Parents Circumcise Their Sons: An Integrative Review Of Literature, Lacy Lauber 2017 DePaul University

Why American Parents Circumcise Their Sons: An Integrative Review Of Literature, Lacy Lauber

Grace Peterson Nursing Research Colloquium

Background: Since medical evidence supports both pros and cons of routine neonatal male circumcision, expectant and new parents are left to make the decision to circumcise their sons on their own. There is limited research as to why American parents choose to circumcise their newborn sons.

Objectives: The purpose of this integrative literature review is to identify the reasons behind parental decision making in neonatal male circumcision in the United States. Understanding motivating factors in parental decision-making can highlight areas of prenatal education for expectant parents.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted utilizing these online databases: PubMed, The Cumulative ...


Open Access In Health Sciences: Learning, Adapting, And Trying To Grow In Academic And Clinical Settings, Rachel K. Stark, Mickel Paris, Joy Rodriguez 2017 California State University, Sacramento

Open Access In Health Sciences: Learning, Adapting, And Trying To Grow In Academic And Clinical Settings, Rachel K. Stark, Mickel Paris, Joy Rodriguez

Open Access Conference

Increasingly clinical doctors desire and need to publish their research. As a result, the issue of open access is moving into the clinical setting. This presents unique challenges to Health Science Librarians. In addition to working alone and with very limited library budgets, Health Science Librarians must stretch their current role to include becoming an open access expert in order to educate hospital administrators and library users, while giving proper advice and guidance to authors within their institutions. Health Sciences Librarians in academic settings also face limited budgets and increasing requests for access to materials on generally smaller budgets. Issues ...


“First, Do No Harm”: Old And New Paradigms In Prehospital Resuscitation In The Aquatic Domain, John H. Pearn, Richard Charles Franklin 2017 Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

“First, Do No Harm”: Old And New Paradigms In Prehospital Resuscitation In The Aquatic Domain, John H. Pearn, Richard Charles Franklin

International Journal of Aquatic Research and Education

The balance between benefit and risk is central to the work of all those involved in aquatic services. The Hippocratic exhortation of Primum non nocere, “First, do no harm,” has a history of over 2000 years. Superficially, all would support this dictum, but harm can result from inaction. The balance between no or little intervention on the one hand and proactive intervention with iatrogenic risk on the other is complex and enduring. Risk implies that one does not have all the information available to know the exact likelihood of an outcome, a common situation involving rescue, first aid, and resuscitation ...


A Request For Non-Voluntary Euthanasia In Bangladesh: A Moral Assessment, Norman K. Swazo 2017 North South University

A Request For Non-Voluntary Euthanasia In Bangladesh: A Moral Assessment, Norman K. Swazo

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

Government authorities in Bangladesh recently were placed in an awkward and extraordinary position of having to make a presumably difficult decision: how to respond to a man’s request to have his two sons and grandson euthanized. This is an extraordinary request for a developing country’s health service authorities to consider, especially in the context of a Muslim-majority population where any appeal to the legitimacy of suicide (and, by extension, physician-assisted suicide) would be automatically rejected as contrary to Islamic moral and jurisprudential principles. Here the case is reviewed in the context of arguments that engage non-voluntary euthanasia and ...


Presumed Consent For Organ Donation: Principlism Opts Out, Ryan M. Marquardt 2017 Cedarville University

Presumed Consent For Organ Donation: Principlism Opts Out, Ryan M. Marquardt

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

The number of available organs for transplant each year falls woefully short of the number of patients in need of donated organs in the United States. While approval numbers are very high for organ donation, the number of registered donors is much smaller. A commonly proposed solution to increase the pool of organ donors is to replace the current explicit consent policy with a presumed consent system, where everyone is considered to have consented as a donor unless they have opted out by joining a non-donor registry or by some other method. This proposal raises many ethical questions that must ...


Mental Illness And The Grace Of God, Laura K. Sjoquist 2017 Cedarville University

Mental Illness And The Grace Of God, Laura K. Sjoquist

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

This paper will attempt to address God's grace towards those with mental illnesses. It also attempts to provide direction in response to historical church views towards this population. Through scripture, this paper seeks to emphasize the importance of seeing a person as more than what they physically appear capable of - seeing people through God's eyes.


Biblical Ethics And Assisted Suicide, Corbett Hall 2017 New York Institute of Technology - Arkansas State University

Biblical Ethics And Assisted Suicide, Corbett Hall

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

Physician-assisted suicide contradicts the traditional role of doctor as healer and undermines the empathetical relationship between physician and patient. Suicide is a tragedy of despair and the triumph of evil; Christian physicians should consider other means to alleviate the suffering of terminal patients.


Autonomy And Patient Care: To What Extent Should Children Make Their Own Decisions?, Heather G. Kuruvilla 2017 Cedarville University

Autonomy And Patient Care: To What Extent Should Children Make Their Own Decisions?, Heather G. Kuruvilla

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

On June 14, 2016, 5-year old Julianna Snow died at home, in accordance with her stated wishes not to return to the hospital. Julianna suffered from a severe form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, an inherited neurodegenerative disorder which, while not always lethal,1 had weakened her body to the extent that even a cold could be fatal.

Julianna’s case raises important questions about patient autonomy and end-of-life care for children. The child did not wish to return to the hospital, and was willing to go to heaven instead.6 Though her parents respected her autonomy and honored her decision, the ...


Senior Editor's Preview, Dennis Sullivan 2017 Cedarville University

Senior Editor's Preview, Dennis Sullivan

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

Senior Editor's Preview


Emotions, Intuitions And Risk Perception In Critical Care, Oleksandr Dubov 2017 Duquesne University

Emotions, Intuitions And Risk Perception In Critical Care, Oleksandr Dubov

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The theory of decision-making as it applies to bioethics and healthcare assumes a rational decision maker: someone who knows all his alternatives, has clear preferences, can rank and weigh risks and benefits of an intervention, and always acts in his own best interests. However, the growing body of research from the field of decision science shows that, in reality, such a purely rational decision maker does not exist. Instead, patients are rational within personal or environmental constraints such as uncertainty or ambiguity in which non-rational approaches such as emotion and intuition are instrumental. This issue is particularly important in critical ...


Medical Ethics Is More Like Chess Than Checkers, Peter G. Holub 2017 Nova Southeastern University

Medical Ethics Is More Like Chess Than Checkers, Peter G. Holub

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Some naysayers say, “Ethics can’t be taught and good character can’t be learned.” This belief is based on the notion that there is a small window of opportunity, sometime between birth and the teenage years, when a person either develops moral character or doesn’t. Parenting gets most of the credit…or all of the blame. If this perspective is true, then what’s the point of trying to teach ethics to medical, nursing and allied health students?


Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2017, 2017 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter, Fall 2017

Mid-Atlantic Ethics Committee Newsletter

No abstract provided.


A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis 2017 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University

A Deliberate Departure: Making Physician-Assisted Suicide Comfortable For Vulnerable Patients, Browne C. Lewis

Browne C Lewis

This Article is divided into four parts. Part I discusses the history and evolution of the "right to die movement" in the United States. The current legal landscape in the United States is examined in Part II. In Part III, I analyze some of the relevant ethical concerns caused by the availability of physician-assisted suicide. My analysis primarily focuses on the Oregon statutes because it is the oldest physician-assisted suicide law in the United States and has served as a model for laws in the United States and abroad. For example, Lord Falconer's Bill, which was defeated by the ...


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