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Corn Nitrogen Fertilization Requirement And Corn–Soybean Productivity With A Rye Cover Crop, Jose L. Pantoja, Krishna P. Woli, John E. Sawyer, Daniel W. Barker 2017 Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas Pichincha

Corn Nitrogen Fertilization Requirement And Corn–Soybean Productivity With A Rye Cover Crop, Jose L. Pantoja, Krishna P. Woli, John E. Sawyer, Daniel W. Barker

John E. Sawyer

Winter rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop (RCC) has potential to reduce NO3–N loss from corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] fields. However, RCC effects on annual crop productivity and corn optimal N fertilization requirement are unclear. The objectives were to evaluate corn and soybean yield response to RCC and corn optimal N rate. Treatments were no-RCC and RCC with six fertilizer N rates (0–225 kg N ha-1) applied to corn in a no-till corn–soybean (CS) rotation at four Iowa sites in 2009 through 2011. The RCC biomass and N uptake was low ...


Does Nitrogen Fertilizer Application Rate To Corn Affect Nitrous Oxide Emissions From The Rotated Soybean Crop?, Javed Iqbal, David C. Mitchell, Daniel W. Barker, Fernando Miguez, John E. Sawyer, Jose Pantoja, Michael J. Castellano 2017 Iowa State University

Does Nitrogen Fertilizer Application Rate To Corn Affect Nitrous Oxide Emissions From The Rotated Soybean Crop?, Javed Iqbal, David C. Mitchell, Daniel W. Barker, Fernando Miguez, John E. Sawyer, Jose Pantoja, Michael J. Castellano

John E. Sawyer

Little information exists on the potential for N fertilizer application to corn (Zea mays L.) to affect N2O emissions during subsequent unfertilized crops in a rotation. To determine if N fertilizer application to corn affects N2O emissions during subsequent crops in rotation, we measured N2O emissions for 3 yr (2011–2013) in an Iowa, corn–soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation with three N fertilizer rates applied to corn (0 kg N ha−1, the recommended rate of 135 kg N ha−1, and a high rate of 225 kg N ha−1); soybean ...


Standardized Research Protocols Enable Transdisciplinary Research Of Climate Variation Impacts In Corn Production Systems, E. J. Kladivko, M. J. Helmers, L. J. Abendroth, D. Herzmann, R. Lal, M. J. Castellano, D. S. Mueller, J. E. Sawyer, R. P. Anex, R. W. Arritt, B. Basso, J. V. Bonta, L. C. Bowling, R. M. Cruse, N. R. Fausey, J. R. Frankenberger, P. W. Gassman, A. J. Gassmann, C. L. Kling, A. Kravchenko, J. G. Lauer, F. E. Miguez, E. D. Nafziger, N. Nkongolo, M. O'Neal, L. B. Owens, P. R. Owens, P. Scharf, M. J. Shipitalo, J. S. Strock, M. B. Villamil 2017 Purdue University

Standardized Research Protocols Enable Transdisciplinary Research Of Climate Variation Impacts In Corn Production Systems, E. J. Kladivko, M. J. Helmers, L. J. Abendroth, D. Herzmann, R. Lal, M. J. Castellano, D. S. Mueller, J. E. Sawyer, R. P. Anex, R. W. Arritt, B. Basso, J. V. Bonta, L. C. Bowling, R. M. Cruse, N. R. Fausey, J. R. Frankenberger, P. W. Gassman, A. J. Gassmann, C. L. Kling, A. Kravchenko, J. G. Lauer, F. E. Miguez, E. D. Nafziger, N. Nkongolo, M. O'Neal, L. B. Owens, P. R. Owens, P. Scharf, M. J. Shipitalo, J. S. Strock, M. B. Villamil

John E. Sawyer

The important questions about agriculture, climate, and sustainability have become increasingly complex and require a coordinated, multifaceted approach for developing new knowledge and understanding. A multistate, transdisciplinary project was begun in 2011 to study the potential for both mitigation and adaptation of corn-based cropping systems to climate variations. The team is measuring the baseline as well as change of the system's carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and water footprints, crop productivity, and pest pressure in response to existing and novel production practices. Nine states and 11 institutions are participating in the project, necessitating a well thought out approach to coordinating ...


The Fungicidal Action Of Formaldehyde, I. E. Melhus, J. C. Gilman, J. B. Kendrick 2017 Iowa State College

The Fungicidal Action Of Formaldehyde, I. E. Melhus, J. C. Gilman, J. B. Kendrick

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

'rhe work presented in this bulletin attempts to open up this field of investigation and supply data bearing on the toxic action of formaldehyde and the influence thereon of concentration of the solution, of temperature of treatment and of duration of exposure. The data is limited to two organisms, Actinomyces scabies and Rhizocttpmoia solani, as they occur on the surfaces of potato tubers. Both laboratory and field work were carried on, altho the latter was limited due to the time required to get results and the non-controlled external factors which influence such results.


Relation Of The Barberry To Stem Rust In Iowa, I. E. Melhus, L. W. Durrell, R. S. Kirby 2017 Iowa State College

Relation Of The Barberry To Stem Rust In Iowa, I. E. Melhus, L. W. Durrell, R. S. Kirby

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

It has been definitely known since 1865 that the European barberry is the alternate host of stem rust (Puccinia graminis); yet the exact relation of this shrub to the annual appearance of stem rust of our grains and grasses is not well understood. Tulasne brothers (18) (1847), de Bary (1) (1865) and others rarely described and figured the morphology of teleutosporic germination. They gave little consideration, however, to the questions as to what environmental conditions influence such germination and the production, dissemination, viability and growth of the sporidia—conditions that have a fundamental bearing on serious attacks of stem rust.


The Effect Of Crown Gall Upon A Young Apple Orchard, Laurenz Greene, I. E. Melhus 2017 Iowa State College

The Effect Of Crown Gall Upon A Young Apple Orchard, Laurenz Greene, I. E. Melhus

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

This bulletin contains a record of progress in a study of the effect of crown gall upon an apple orchard from the time it is set out until it becomes of bearing age. The relative influence of various types of galls upon the annual growth of the trees has been considered and some data have been gathered on the amount and position of the galls in relation to the growth and percentage of stand in the orchard. Also, the susceptibility of certain kinds of apple trees to crown gall after they have been planted in the orchard, and the persistence ...


Studies On The Crown Rust Of Oats, I. E. Melhus, L. W. Durrell 2017 Iowa State College

Studies On The Crown Rust Of Oats, I. E. Melhus, L. W. Durrell

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

During some seasons crown rust of oats (Puccinia coronata Corda) becomes a serious limiting factor in successful oat production in Iowa. It is not uncommon to have this rust occur in epidemic form one year and the following year to have only a small amount of the disease present. Up to the present time the various factors which influence the growth, development and epidemiology of this rust have not been definitely studied.


Studies On A Fusarium Disease Of Corn And Sorghum (Preliminary), L. H. Pammel, C. M. King, J. L. Seal 2017 Iowa State College

Studies On A Fusarium Disease Of Corn And Sorghum (Preliminary), L. H. Pammel, C. M. King, J. L. Seal

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

A new fusarium disease of corn made its appearance in Iowa, during the season of 1914, seriously injuring the corn crop 01' the state and causing a loss estimated at more than $15,000,000. It was not confined to Iowa, for reports of a similar disease were sent to the Iowa Agricultural Experiment station by H. B. Clark of Blair, Neb., who found an abundance of it there and elsewhere in that state. One of the authors observed the fusarium that same season in western I Illinois and northern Missouri and Dr. E. C. Stakman reported that it occurred ...


Towards The Development Of A Sustainable Soya Bean-Based Feedstock For Aquaculture, Hyunwoo Park, Steven Weier, Fareha Razvi, Pamela A. Peña, Neil A. Sims, Jennica Lowell, Cory Hungate, Karma Kissinger, Gavin Key, Paul Fraser, Jonathan Napier, Edgar B. Cahoon, Thomas Clemente 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Towards The Development Of A Sustainable Soya Bean-Based Feedstock For Aquaculture, Hyunwoo Park, Steven Weier, Fareha Razvi, Pamela A. Peña, Neil A. Sims, Jennica Lowell, Cory Hungate, Karma Kissinger, Gavin Key, Paul Fraser, Jonathan Napier, Edgar B. Cahoon, Thomas Clemente

Faculty Publications from the Center for Plant Science Innovation

Soya bean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is sought after for both its oil and protein components. Genetic approaches to add value to either component are ongoing efforts in soya bean breeding and molecular biology programmes. The former is the primary vegetable oil consumed in the world. Hence, its primary usage is in direct human consumption. As a means to increase its utility in feed applications, thereby expanding the market of soya bean coproducts, we investigated the simultaneous displacement of marine ingredients in aquafeeds with soya bean-based protein and a high Omega-3 fatty acid soya bean oil, enriched with alpha-linolenic and ...


Supplemental Data, Russell J. Ingram, Foster Levy, Cindy L. Barrett, James T. Donaldson 2017 University of Georgia

Supplemental Data, Russell J. Ingram, Foster Levy, Cindy L. Barrett, James T. Donaldson

ETSU Faculty Works

No abstract provided.


Glucose-Abl1-Tor Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning To Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation, Margarita Marroquin-Guzman, Guangchao Sun, Richard Wilson 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Glucose-Abl1-Tor Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning To Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation, Margarita Marroquin-Guzman, Guangchao Sun, Richard Wilson

Papers in Plant Pathology

The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon- responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis ...


Expression Of Apoplast-Targeted Plant Defensin Mtdef4.2 Confers Resistance To Leaf Rust Pathogen Puccinia Triticina But Does Not Affect Mycorrhizal Symbiosis In Transgenic Wheat, Jagdeep Kaur, John Fellers, Alok Adholeya, Siva L.S. Velivelli, Kaoutar El-Mounadi, Natalya Nersesian, Thomas E. Clemente, Dilip Shah 2017 Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Expression Of Apoplast-Targeted Plant Defensin Mtdef4.2 Confers Resistance To Leaf Rust Pathogen Puccinia Triticina But Does Not Affect Mycorrhizal Symbiosis In Transgenic Wheat, Jagdeep Kaur, John Fellers, Alok Adholeya, Siva L.S. Velivelli, Kaoutar El-Mounadi, Natalya Nersesian, Thomas E. Clemente, Dilip Shah

Faculty Publications from the Center for Plant Science Innovation

Rust fungi of the order Pucciniales are destructive pathogens of wheat worldwide. Leaf rust caused by the obligate, biotrophic basidiomycete fungus Puccinia triticina (Pt) is an economically important disease capable of causing up to 50 % yield losses. Historically, resistant wheat cultivars have been used to control leaf rust, but genetic resistance is ephemeral and breaks down with the emergence of new virulent Pt races. There is a need to develop alternative measures for control of leaf rust in wheat. Development of transgenic wheat expressing an antifungal defensin offers a promising approach to complement the endogenous resistance genes within the wheat ...


Effect Of Foliar Fungicides On Standability Of Corn, Alison Robertson, Dan Schaben 2017 Iowa State University

Effect Of Foliar Fungicides On Standability Of Corn, Alison Robertson, Dan Schaben

Farm Progress Reports

Fungicide use on hybrid corn continues to be of interest to many farmers in Iowa. Fungicides keep crops greener even after black layer development. Many farmers have reported corn stands better when a fungicide is applied. Consequently, some farmers apply a fungicide, even in the absence of disease, to assist with harvest. There are no published data to support this observation, therefore the objective of this trial was to determine if a fungicide application at VT reduced stalk lodging at harvest.


Evaluation Of Foliar Fungicideson Soybeans In Southwest Iowa, Daren Mueller, Jean Batzer, Yuba Kandel, Stith Wiggs 2017 Iowa State University

Evaluation Of Foliar Fungicideson Soybeans In Southwest Iowa, Daren Mueller, Jean Batzer, Yuba Kandel, Stith Wiggs

Farm Progress Reports

Foliar fungicides were assessed on soybeans for foliar disease management and yield response across seven Iowa State University research station locations including the Northwest Farm (Sutherland), Northern Farm (Kanawha), Northeast Farm (Nashua), Johnson Farm (Ames), Armstrong Farm (Lewis), McNay Farm (Chariton), and Southeast Farm (Crawfordsville).


Comparing Between-Row Mulchesin Organic Muskmelon And Squash—Year 1, Hayley Nelson, Mark Gleason 2017 Iowa State University

Comparing Between-Row Mulchesin Organic Muskmelon And Squash—Year 1, Hayley Nelson, Mark Gleason

Farm Progress Reports

Organic farmers must plan carefully to manage weeds and soil health. Mulching not only aids weed management, but also can improve soil quality. Organic-matter mulches compete with weeds for sunlight, moisture, nutrients, and growing space. They also improve soil health by reducing soil erosion and increasing soil organic matter. Organic matter contributes greatly to soil structure and microbial activity, both of which are essential to plant health.

The goal of this trial was to compare the effectiveness of two mulch treatments to suppress weeds, improve soil organic matter, and increase yields of organic muskmelon and acorn squash.


Improving Row Cover Systems For Organic Management Of Bacterial Wilt In Muskmelon And Squash—Year 1, Hayley Nelson, Mark Gleason 2017 Iowa State University

Improving Row Cover Systems For Organic Management Of Bacterial Wilt In Muskmelon And Squash—Year 1, Hayley Nelson, Mark Gleason

Farm Progress Reports

Bacterial wilt is a devastating disease of cucurbit crops (melon, cucumber, squash, pumpkin) in Iowa. Striped and spotted cucumber beetles transmit the bacteria (Erwinia tracheiphila) to cucurbit plants when their infected frass comes in contact with feeding wounds and floral nectaries. Infected plants usually wilt and die within two weeks.


Effectiveness Of Foliar Fungicides By Timing On Northern Leaf Blight On Hybrid Corn In Northeast Iowa, Alison Robertson, Ken Pecinovsky 2017 Iowa State University

Effectiveness Of Foliar Fungicides By Timing On Northern Leaf Blight On Hybrid Corn In Northeast Iowa, Alison Robertson, Ken Pecinovsky

Farm Progress Reports

Fungicide use on hybrid corn continues to be of interest to many farmers in Iowa. The number of fungicides registered for use on corn continues to increase, especially with the introduction of various generics. The objectives of this project were to 1) assess the effect of timing of application of fungicides on disease, 2) evaluate the yield response of hybrid corn to foliar fungicide application, and 3) discern differences, if any, between fungicide products.


Evaluation Of Foliar Fungicides On Soybeans In Northeast Iowa, Daren Mueller, Jean Batzer, Yuba Kandel, Stith Wiggs 2017 Iowa State University

Evaluation Of Foliar Fungicides On Soybeans In Northeast Iowa, Daren Mueller, Jean Batzer, Yuba Kandel, Stith Wiggs

Farm Progress Reports

Foliar fungicides were assessed on soybeans for foliar disease management and yield response across seven Iowa State University research station locations including the Northwest Farm (Sutherland), Northern Farm (Kanawha), Northeast Farm (Nashua), Johnson Farm (Ames), Armstrong Farm (Lewis), McNay Farm (Chariton), and Southeast Farm (Crawfordsville).


Foliar Fungicides In Alfalfa Production: A Five-Year Summary, Brian J. Lang, Ken Pecinovsky 2017 Iowa State University

Foliar Fungicides In Alfalfa Production: A Five-Year Summary, Brian J. Lang, Ken Pecinovsky

Farm Progress Reports

Over the past five years, Iowa State University (ISU) has conducted 15 site-years of foliar fungicide research trials at the ISU Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm, Nashua, Iowa. This report summarizes 191 fungicide treatments by harvest comparisons from this research.


On-Farm Corn And Soybean Fungicide Trials, Jim Fawcett, Josh Sievers, Joel DeJong, Cody Schneider 2017 Iowa State University

On-Farm Corn And Soybean Fungicide Trials, Jim Fawcett, Josh Sievers, Joel Dejong, Cody Schneider

Farm Progress Reports

An application of foliar fungicide to corn and soybean has become a common input for many farmers in Iowa. The effect of fungicide on corn and soybean yield, however, can vary from year to year. Environmental conditions, such as rainfall and temperature, influence disease development, which will determine whether a fungicide affects yield. Because environmental conditions vary from one year to the next, it is difficult to predict how and when to use a fungicide. The objective of these trials was to evaluate whether the application of a foliar fungicide would result in a yield increase in corn and soybean.


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