Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Other Plant Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

796 Full-Text Articles 2403 Authors 102925 Downloads 51 Institutions

All Articles in Other Plant Sciences

Faceted Search

796 full-text articles. Page 1 of 20.

Phenotypic Variation And Genetic Purity Of The Original 'Prime-Jim®' X 'Arapaho' Population, Loren M. Luther 2017 University of Arkansas

Phenotypic Variation And Genetic Purity Of The Original 'Prime-Jim®' X 'Arapaho' Population, Loren M. Luther

Horticulture Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 2013, Castro et al., produced the first linkage map for primocane-fruiting blackberries using the cross ‘Prime-Jim®’ x ‘Arapaho.’ This mapping population has been maintained since the original experiment with the hopes of conducting future studies. Further research was determined to be needed on the population to better characterize additional phenotypic traits, and since nine years had passed since the seedlings were established, there was a need to assess the continued genetic purity of the population using molecular methods. Phenotypic data was collected to analyze the variation of the population including soluble solids content, titratable acidity, average weight, shape, and ...


Corn Residue Use By Livestock In The United States, Marty R. Schmer, Rachael M. Brown, Virginia L. Jin, Robert B. Mitchell, Daren D. Redfearn 2017 USDA-ARS

Corn Residue Use By Livestock In The United States, Marty R. Schmer, Rachael M. Brown, Virginia L. Jin, Robert B. Mitchell, Daren D. Redfearn

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

Corn (Zea mays L.) residue grazing or harvest provides a simple and economical practice to integrate crops and livestock, but limited information is available on how widespread corn residue utilization is practiced by US producers. In 2010, the USDA Economic Research Service surveyed producers from 19 states on corn grain and residue management practices. Total corn residue grazed or harvested was 4.87 million ha. Approximately 4.06 million ha was grazed by 11.7 million livestock (primarily cattle) in 2010. The majority of grazed corn residue occurred in Nebraska (1.91 million ha), Iowa (385,000 ha), South Dakota ...


Location Choices Of Ethanol Firms In The Midwest Corn Belt, Monica A. Haddad, Gary Taylor, Francis Y. Owusu 2017 Iowa State University

Location Choices Of Ethanol Firms In The Midwest Corn Belt, Monica A. Haddad, Gary Taylor, Francis Y. Owusu

Monica Haddad

The Corn Belt has experienced a rapid expansion of corn-based ethanol plants. This has provided researchers the opportunity to examine the relative importance to the renewable fuels industry of several location factors previously identified as important to agro-industries. Using probit regression this study identifies the factors significant to ethanol firms’ location decisions in the four-state study area of Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota and Nebraska. In Iowa and Illinois, where corn is largely ubiquitous, firms move beyond corn supply to consider other localized factors in their decisionmaking process. Factors such as rail access, population density and proximity to blending terminals emerge as ...


Glucose-Abl1-Tor Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning To Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation, Margarita Marroquin-Guzman, Guangchao Sun, Richard Wilson 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Glucose-Abl1-Tor Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning To Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation, Margarita Marroquin-Guzman, Guangchao Sun, Richard Wilson

Papers in Plant Pathology

The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon- responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis ...


Genes Linked To Production Of Secondary Metabolites In Talaromyces Atroroseus Revealed Using Crispr-Cas9, Maria Lund Nielsen, Thomas Isbrandt, Kasper Bøwig Rasmussen, Ulf Thrane, Jakob Blæsbjerg Hoof, Thomas Ostenfeld Larsen, Uffe Hasbro Mortensen 2017 Technical University of Denmark

Genes Linked To Production Of Secondary Metabolites In Talaromyces Atroroseus Revealed Using Crispr-Cas9, Maria Lund Nielsen, Thomas Isbrandt, Kasper Bøwig Rasmussen, Ulf Thrane, Jakob Blæsbjerg Hoof, Thomas Ostenfeld Larsen, Uffe Hasbro Mortensen

Papers in Plant Pathology

The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in ...


The Morphogenesis-Related Ndr Kinase Pathway Of Colletotrichum Orbiculare Is Required For Translating Plant Surface Signals Into Infection-Related Morphogenesis And Pathogenesis, Sayo Kodama, Junya Ishizuka, Ito Miyashita, Takaaki Ishii, Takumi Nishiuchi, Hideto Miyoshi, Yasuyuki Kubo 2017 Kyoto Prefectural University

The Morphogenesis-Related Ndr Kinase Pathway Of Colletotrichum Orbiculare Is Required For Translating Plant Surface Signals Into Infection-Related Morphogenesis And Pathogenesis, Sayo Kodama, Junya Ishizuka, Ito Miyashita, Takaaki Ishii, Takumi Nishiuchi, Hideto Miyoshi, Yasuyuki Kubo

Papers in Plant Pathology

Plant infection by pathogenic fungi involves the differentiation of appressoria, specialized infection structures, initiated by fungal sensing and responding to plant surface signals. How plant fungal pathogens control infection-related morphogenesis in response to plant-derived signals has been unclear. Here we showed that the morphogenesis-related NDR kinase pathway (MOR) of the cucumber anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum orbiculare is crucial for appressorium development following perception of plant-derived signals. By screening of random insertional mutants, we identified that the MOR element CoPag1 (Perish-in-theabsence-of-GYP1) is a key component of the plant-derived signaling pathway involved in appressorium morphogenesis. Constitutive activation of the NDR kinase CoCbk1 ...


Genes Linked To Production Of Secondary Metabolites In Talaromyces Atroroseus Revealed Using Crispr-Cas9, Maria Lund Nielsen, Thomas Isbrandt, Kasper Bøwig Rasmussen, Ulf Thrane, Jakob Blæsbjerg Hoof, Thomas Ostenfeld Larsen, Uffe Hasbro Mortensen 2017 Technical University of Denmark

Genes Linked To Production Of Secondary Metabolites In Talaromyces Atroroseus Revealed Using Crispr-Cas9, Maria Lund Nielsen, Thomas Isbrandt, Kasper Bøwig Rasmussen, Ulf Thrane, Jakob Blæsbjerg Hoof, Thomas Ostenfeld Larsen, Uffe Hasbro Mortensen

Papers in Plant Pathology

The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in ...


Muti Site Screening Identifies And Verifies Levels Of Resistance To White Mold In Common Bean In 2016, Robert Higgins, James R. Steadman 2017 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Muti Site Screening Identifies And Verifies Levels Of Resistance To White Mold In Common Bean In 2016, Robert Higgins, James R. Steadman

Papers in Plant Pathology

The development of common bean cultivars with partial resistance and/ or avoidance to white mold (WM) caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum would benefit producers by reducing yield loss and reducing input costs for fungicides. Our main objective in this study is to identify bean germplasm supplied by bean breeders from across the USA and Belgium with levels of partial resistance to WM. Breeders sent seed of 9 bean lines for field testing and 25 bean lines for greenhouse testing with putative sources of resistance to our laboratory. The seeds were divided in equal amounts for field (400g/line) and/or greenhouse ...


Phenotypic And Genotypic Characterization Of Relevant Sclerotinia Sclerotiorum Isolates, Thomas J. Justo Miorini, Anthony G. Pannullo, T. Hornby, Robert Higgins, Sydney E. Everhart, James R. Steadman 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Phenotypic And Genotypic Characterization Of Relevant Sclerotinia Sclerotiorum Isolates, Thomas J. Justo Miorini, Anthony G. Pannullo, T. Hornby, Robert Higgins, Sydney E. Everhart, James R. Steadman

Papers in Plant Pathology

Knowledge of pathogen population structure is useful to identify isolates for screening cultivars and lines for resistance. For S. sclerotiorum, causal agent of white mold in more than 400 plant species, including common bean and soybean, breeding for resistance is particularly challenging. The objective of this study was to characterize phenotypic and genotypic variation of S. sclerotiorum isolates from soybean production areas of the U.S.A. (15), Brazil (75), and Argentina (5) to compare them with 366 isolates from dry bean characterized previously (Everhart et al., 2016).


Nitrogen Pulses And Competition Between Native And Invasive Plant Species, Nicolas Matallana, Mandy L. Slate, Ragan M. Callaway 2017 University of Montana, Missoula

Nitrogen Pulses And Competition Between Native And Invasive Plant Species, Nicolas Matallana, Mandy L. Slate, Ragan M. Callaway

Undergraduate Theses and Professional Papers

Variation in the timing and size of resource fluctuations can influence how plants grow, allocate biomass, and reproduce. Resources are sometimes made available in relatively continuous, reliable pulses while other times they are temporally separated and unpredictable. Native and invasive plant species are thought to respond differently to resource fluctuations, or pulses, which can influence competitive outcomes. The “Fluctuating Resource Hypothesis” predicts that resource fluctuations benefit invasive species more than native species, potentially because many invaders are highly effective at rapidly capturing resources. In a field setting, we examined the effects of varying nitrogen pulses on competition between exotic invasive ...


Stress-Responsive Pathways And Small Rna Changes Distinguish Variable Developmental Phenotypes Caused By Msh1 Loss, Mon-Ray Shao, Sunil Kumar Kenchanmane Raju, John D. Laurie, Robersy Sanchez, Sally A. Mackenzie 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Stress-Responsive Pathways And Small Rna Changes Distinguish Variable Developmental Phenotypes Caused By Msh1 Loss, Mon-Ray Shao, Sunil Kumar Kenchanmane Raju, John D. Laurie, Robersy Sanchez, Sally A. Mackenzie

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

Background: Proper regulation of nuclear-encoded, organelle-targeted genes is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial function. Among these genes, MutS Homolog 1 (MSH1) is notable for generating an assortment of mutant phenotypes with varying degrees of penetrance and pleiotropy. Stronger phenotypes have been connected to stress tolerance and epigenetic changes, and in Arabidopsis T-DNA mutants, two generations of homozygosity with the msh1 insertion are required before severe phenotypes begin to emerge. These observations prompted us to examine how msh1 mutants contrast according to generation and phenotype by profiling their respective transcriptomes and small RNA populations.

Results: Using RNA-seq, we analyze pathways that ...


Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow From Glyphosate-Resistant Common Waterhemp (Amaranthus Rudis Sauer): Consequences For The Dispersal Of Resistance Genes, Debalin Sarangi, Andrew J. Tyre, Eric L. Patterson, Todd A. Gaines, Suat Irmak, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist, Amit J. Jhala 2017 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow From Glyphosate-Resistant Common Waterhemp (Amaranthus Rudis Sauer): Consequences For The Dispersal Of Resistance Genes, Debalin Sarangi, Andrew J. Tyre, Eric L. Patterson, Todd A. Gaines, Suat Irmak, Stevan Z. Knezevic, John L. Lindquist, Amit J. Jhala

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

Gene flow is an important component in evolutionary biology; however, the role of gene flow in dispersal of herbicide-resistant alleles among weed populations is poorly understood. Field experiments were conducted at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) from glyphosate-resistant (GR) to -susceptible (GS) common waterhemp using a concentric donorreceptor design. More than 130,000 common waterhemp plants were screened and 26,199 plants were confirmed resistant to glyphosate. Frequency of gene flow from all distances, directions, and years was estimated with a double exponential decay model using Generalized Nonlinear Model (package gnm) in R. PMGF declined ...


The Role Of Tre6p And Snrk1 In Maize Early Kernel Development And Events Leading To Stress-Induced Kernel Abortion, Samuel W. Bledsoe, Clémence Henry, Cara A. Griffiths, Matthew J. Paul, Regina Feil, John E. Lunn, Mark Stitt, L. Mark Lagrimini 2017 EAG Laboratories

The Role Of Tre6p And Snrk1 In Maize Early Kernel Development And Events Leading To Stress-Induced Kernel Abortion, Samuel W. Bledsoe, Clémence Henry, Cara A. Griffiths, Matthew J. Paul, Regina Feil, John E. Lunn, Mark Stitt, L. Mark Lagrimini

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

Background: Drought stress during flowering is a major contributor to yield loss in maize. Genetic and biotechnological improvement in yield sustainability requires an understanding of the mechanisms underpinning yield loss. Sucrose starvation has been proposed as the cause for kernel abortion; however, potential targets for genetic improvement have not been identified. Field and greenhouse drought studies with maize are expensive and it can be difficult to reproduce results; therefore, an in vitro kernel culture method is presented as a proxy for drought stress occurring at the time of flowering in maize (3 days after pollination). This method is used to ...


Advancing Nasa’S Airmoss P-Band Radar Root Zone Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm Via Incorporation Of Richards’ Equation, Morteza Sadeghi, Alireza Tabatabaeenejad, Markus Tuller, Mahta Moghaddam, Scott B. Jones 2016 Utah State University

Advancing Nasa’S Airmoss P-Band Radar Root Zone Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm Via Incorporation Of Richards’ Equation, Morteza Sadeghi, Alireza Tabatabaeenejad, Markus Tuller, Mahta Moghaddam, Scott B. Jones

Plants, Soils, and Climate Faculty Publications

P-band radar remote sensing applied during the Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission has shown great potential for estimation of root zone soil moisture. When retrieving the soil moisture profile (SMP) from P-band radar observations, a mathematical function describing the vertical moisture distribution is required. Because only a limited number of observations are available, the number of free parameters of the mathematical model must not exceed the number of observed data. For this reason, an empirical quadratic function (second order polynomial) is currently applied in the AirMOSS inversion algorithm to retrieve the SMP. The three free parameters ...


Can Sub-Saharan Africa Feed Itself?, Martin K. van Ittersum, Lenny G. J. van Bussel, Joost Wolf, Patricio Grassini, Justin van Wart, Nicolas Guilpart, Lieven Claessens, Hugo de Groot, Keith Wiebe, Daniel Mason-D'Croz, Haishun Yang, Hendrik Boogard, Pepijn A. J. van Oort, Marloes P. van Loon, Kazuki Saito, Ochieng Adimo, Samuel Adjei-Nsiah, Alhassane Agali, Abdullahi Bala, Regis Chikowo, Kayuki Kaizzi, Mamoutou Kouressy, Joachim H. J. R. Makoi, Korodjouma Ouattara, Kindie Tesfaye, Kenneth G. Cassman 2016 Wageningen Agricultural University

Can Sub-Saharan Africa Feed Itself?, Martin K. Van Ittersum, Lenny G. J. Van Bussel, Joost Wolf, Patricio Grassini, Justin Van Wart, Nicolas Guilpart, Lieven Claessens, Hugo De Groot, Keith Wiebe, Daniel Mason-D'Croz, Haishun Yang, Hendrik Boogard, Pepijn A. J. Van Oort, Marloes P. Van Loon, Kazuki Saito, Ochieng Adimo, Samuel Adjei-Nsiah, Alhassane Agali, Abdullahi Bala, Regis Chikowo, Kayuki Kaizzi, Mamoutou Kouressy, Joachim H. J. R. Makoi, Korodjouma Ouattara, Kindie Tesfaye, Kenneth G. Cassman

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

Although global food demand is expected to increase 60% by 2050 compared with 2005/2007, the rise will be much greater in sub- Saharan Africa (SSA). Indeed, SSA is the region at greatest food security risk because by 2050 its population will increase 2.5-fold and demand for cereals approximately triple, whereas current levels of cereal consumption already depend on substantial imports. At issue is whether SSA can meet this vast increase in cereal demand without greater reliance on cereal imports or major expansion of agricultural area and associated biodiversity loss and greenhouse gas emissions. Recent studies indicate that the ...


Can Functional Traits Predict Plant Community Response To Global Change?, Sarah Kimball, Jennifer L. Funk, Marko J. Spasojevic, Katharine N. Suding, Scot Parker, Michael K. Goulden 2016 University of California - Irvine

Can Functional Traits Predict Plant Community Response To Global Change?, Sarah Kimball, Jennifer L. Funk, Marko J. Spasojevic, Katharine N. Suding, Scot Parker, Michael K. Goulden

Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles and Research

One primary goal at the intersection of community ecology and global change biology is to identify functional traits that are useful for predicting plant community response to global change. We used observations of community composition from a long-term field experiment in two adjacent plant communities (grassland and coastal sage shrub) to investigate how nine key plant functional traits were related to altered water and nitrogen availability following fire. We asked whether the functional responses of species found in more than one community type were context dependent and whether community-weighted mean and functional diversity were significantly altered by water and nitrogen ...


Can Functional Traits Predict Plant Community Response To Global Change?, Sarah Kimball, Jennifer L. Funk, Marko J. Spasojevic, Katharine N. Suding, Scot Parker, Michael K. Goulden 2016 University of California - Irvine

Can Functional Traits Predict Plant Community Response To Global Change?, Sarah Kimball, Jennifer L. Funk, Marko J. Spasojevic, Katharine N. Suding, Scot Parker, Michael K. Goulden

Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles and Research

One primary goal at the intersection of community ecology and global change biology is to identify functional traits that are useful for predicting plant community response to global change. We used observations of community composition from a long-term field experiment in two adjacent plant communities (grassland and coastal sage shrub) to investigate how nine key plant functional traits were related to altered water and nitrogen availability following fire. We asked whether the functional responses of species found in more than one community type were context dependent and whether community-weighted mean and functional diversity were significantly altered by water and nitrogen ...


Measuring Leaf Area Index (Lai) And Vegetation Growing Season Length To Better Understand The Interactions And Feedbacks Between Vegetation And The Changing Climate., Steven Schwarz 2016 Murray State University

Measuring Leaf Area Index (Lai) And Vegetation Growing Season Length To Better Understand The Interactions And Feedbacks Between Vegetation And The Changing Climate., Steven Schwarz

Scholars Week

The purpose of this research was to measure and model vegetation growing seasons of deciduous tree species located at Murray State University Hancock Biological Station. The study began in September of 2015, and consisted of collecting leaf area index (LAI) from 3 defined locations using the Decagon LP80 Ceptometer, and Sentek soil probes to measure soil moisture/temperature. LAI data were collected weekly at various times, while soil temperature and moister recordings were collected in 60 minute intervals at depths of 5 to 55 cm in 10 cm increments. This study was important because it is essential to measure LAI ...


Comparison Of The Production Of Bibb Lettuce Reared In Indoor Aquaponics System Using Large Mouth Bass (Micropterus Salmoides) Vs. Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus), George J. Pate 2016 Kentucky State University

Comparison Of The Production Of Bibb Lettuce Reared In Indoor Aquaponics System Using Large Mouth Bass (Micropterus Salmoides) Vs. Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus), George J. Pate

Posters-at-the-Capitol

Aquaponics is a sustainable food production system that combines hydroponic plant growth with fish rearing in a recirculating aquaculture system. Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) are predominantly raised in aquaponics due to their fast growth rates and ability to tolerate a variety of water conditions. As aquaponics becomes more popular in temperate climate zones, farmers are looking for alternative fish species that are more compatible with cooler temperatures and have a higher market value than tilapia. Authors will determine if plant growth factors as well as, the availability of nutrients in aquaponic systems are affected by the difference in nutrient requirements ...


Sensitivity Of Seven Diverse Species To Blue And Green Light: Interactions With Photon Flux, Michael Chase Snowden, Bruce Bugbee, Kevin R. Cope 2016 Utah State University

Sensitivity Of Seven Diverse Species To Blue And Green Light: Interactions With Photon Flux, Michael Chase Snowden, Bruce Bugbee, Kevin R. Cope

Plants, Soils, and Climate Faculty Publications

Despite decades of research, the effects of spectral quality on plant growth, and development are not well understood. Much of our current understanding comes from studies with daily integrated light levels that are less than 10% of summer sunlight thus making it difficult to characterize interactions between light quality and quantity. Several studies have reported that growth is increased under fluorescent lamps compared to mixtures of wavelengths from LEDs. Conclusions regarding the effect of green light fraction range from detrimental to beneficial. Here we report the effects of eight blue and green light fractions at two photosynthetic photon fluxes (PPF ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress