Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Horticulture Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,570 Full-Text Articles 6,218 Authors 1,542,257 Downloads 89 Institutions

All Articles in Horticulture

Faceted Search

4,570 full-text articles. Page 1 of 124.

Maples In The Landscape, Sheriden M. Hansen, Jaydee Gunnell, Andra Emmertson 2021 Utah State University

Maples In The Landscape, Sheriden M. Hansen, Jaydee Gunnell, Andra Emmertson

All Current Publications

Maple trees (Acer sp.) are a common fixture and beautiful addition to Utah landscapes. There are over one hundred species, each with numerous cultivars (cultivated varieties) that are native to both North America and much of Northern Europe. Trees vary in size and shape, from small, almost prostrate forms like certain Japanese maples (Acer palmatum) and shrubby bigtooth maples (Acer grandidentatum) to large and stately shade trees like the Norway maple (Acer platanoides). Tree shape can vary greatly, ranging from upright, columnar, rounded, pyramidal to spreading. Because trees come in a range of shapes and sizes, there is almost always ...


Long-Term Changes In Soil Surface Properties As Affected By Management Practices In A Wheat-Soybean, Double-Crop System, Machaela Morrison 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Long-Term Changes In Soil Surface Properties As Affected By Management Practices In A Wheat-Soybean, Double-Crop System, Machaela Morrison

Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Honors Theses

Long-term agricultural sustainability and productivity are controlled by the integrative effects of different management practices on the soil. Many Arkansas producers use the double-crop system to grow soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr] and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Studying combinations of different, non-traditional, alternative agricultural techniques may help producers better understand the long-term implications of various management practice options on sustainability and productivity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of agricultural management practices, including residue level, tillage, irrigation, and burning, and soil depth on the change in various soil properties from 2010 to 2020 in a long-term ...


Nebline, May 2021, 2021 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Nebline, May 2021

The NEBLINE Newsletter Archive from UNL Extension in Lancaster County

Building Health Equity in Lincoln: Extension Launches Health Equity Coalition

Recipe of the Month

Intensive Gardening Techniques

Garden Guide Things to Do This Month

Naturally Occurring Elements in Groundwater--Part 3 of a Series — Fluoride

Cash Rent Survey

Preparing for the Inevitable: Japanese Beetles

Challenge Accepted! Children Thrive Outside

Heart of 4-H Volunteer Award: Rusty & Heidi Hanley

4-H Announcements for 4-H'ers and Volunteers

Clover College: June 15–18, 2021

EXTENSION CALENDAR

4-H’ers Qualify for State Speech & PSA Contest

4-H Horse Stampede Results


Evaluating Silicon Foliar Sprays As A Strategy To Improve Postproduction Performance Of Potted Basil (Ocimum Basilicum L.), Joshua Tebow 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Evaluating Silicon Foliar Sprays As A Strategy To Improve Postproduction Performance Of Potted Basil (Ocimum Basilicum L.), Joshua Tebow

Horticulture Undergraduate Honors Theses

The objective of the study was to evaluate foliar silicon (Si) applications for effects on the growth and performance of container-grown basil during production and resistance to postproduction wilt in retail. Basil (Ocimum basilicum ‘Genovese’ L.) seedling plugs were transplanted into 10-cm diameter plastic containers with peat-based substrate and grown for 42 d in a polycarbonate greenhouse. Plants were irrigated with fertilizer solution consisting of a 17.0 nitrogen (N)-1.3 phosphorus-14.1 potassium water-soluble fertilizer dissolved in tap water at 150 mg∙L-1 N. Foliar sprays containing sodium silicate at 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg∙L-1 ...


Not All Pollinator Gardens Are Created Equally: Determining Factors Pertinent To Improving Pollinator Garden Effectiveness, Travis Watson 2021 East Tennessee State University

Not All Pollinator Gardens Are Created Equally: Determining Factors Pertinent To Improving Pollinator Garden Effectiveness, Travis Watson

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Increasing evidence documenting the decline of insect populations, resulting from increasing human disturbances has resulted in efforts to establish pollinator gardens to provide additional resources for insect populations. However, our understanding of biotic and abiotic garden characteristics important for attracting and sustaining pollinator diversity is limited. Here, we evaluated 17 pollinator gardens to evaluate the effect of five biotic and three abiotic garden characteristics on pollinator species richness, abundance, and proportional representation of four pollinator functional groups. Plant species richness positively influenced pollinator richness and negatively influenced flower visitation. Bombus proportional abundance responded to several variables (distance to vegetation, plant ...


Conserving Water Through Modular Planting Design: Water-Wise Templates For Ogden's Residential Front Yard Landscapes, Jessica Clements 2021 Utah State University

Conserving Water Through Modular Planting Design: Water-Wise Templates For Ogden's Residential Front Yard Landscapes, Jessica Clements

All Graduate Plan B and other Reports

Due to the arid climate of the Wasatch front and the projected population growth in the next thirty years, water conservation is essential. Consequently, because the landscape consumes 60% of Utah residences’ purified drinking water, water-wise landscaping needs to be a priority. This thesis creates water-wise landscape templates that can be applied to the front yards of Ogden rental properties using a modular planting method. This study determines best practices by researching topics such as water-wise plants for Northern Utah, templates utilized in other areas, modular planting, and existing organizations with similar goals. This results in a user-friendly guide that ...


Vegetable Diseases Of Utah, Claudia Nischwitz, Mair Murray, Nick Volesky 2021 Utah State University

Vegetable Diseases Of Utah, Claudia Nischwitz, Mair Murray, Nick Volesky

All Current Publications

This guide provides a list of vegetable crop diseases that have been documented in Utah along with some that are likely to occur. Plant diseases are caused by pathogens such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and fungal-like organisms. Diagnosing specific plant diseases takes careful observation of signs, symptoms, and sometimes culturing and molecular testing in a laboratory setting.


Does Light Quality Influence Arabidopsis Thaliana Growth In Controlled Environments?, Nathan A. Deppe, Daniel A. Little, Kathleen K. Zapf 2021 Purdue University

Does Light Quality Influence Arabidopsis Thaliana Growth In Controlled Environments?, Nathan A. Deppe, Daniel A. Little, Kathleen K. Zapf

Purdue Methods for Arabidopsis Growth

This study examines the use of diverse lamp types, with inherently different spectral attributes, to determine light quality influence on Arabidopsis thaliana growth in controlled environments.


High Tunnel Pest Management - Aphids, Nick Volesky, Zachery R. Schrumm 2021 Utah State University

High Tunnel Pest Management - Aphids, Nick Volesky, Zachery R. Schrumm

All Current Publications

Aphids are a common pest found on high tunnel crops such as fruits, vegetables, ornamentals, grasses, and weeds. Four aphid species commonly found in Utah in high tunnels are green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), melon aphid (Aphis gossypii), potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae), and cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae). This fact sheet describes different aphids and reviews the aphid life cycle. It also addresses how to monitor for damage caused by aphids and cultural, biological, and chemical controls.


Comparing Biochar-Swine Manure Mixture To Conventional Manure Impact On Soil Nutrient Availability And Plant Uptake—A Greenhouse Study, Chumki Banik, Jacek A. Koziel, Darcy Bonds, Asheesh K. Singh, Mark A. Licht 2021 Iowa State University

Comparing Biochar-Swine Manure Mixture To Conventional Manure Impact On Soil Nutrient Availability And Plant Uptake—A Greenhouse Study, Chumki Banik, Jacek A. Koziel, Darcy Bonds, Asheesh K. Singh, Mark A. Licht

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

The use of swine manure as a source of plant nutrients is one alternative to synthetic fertilizers. However, conventional manure application with >90% water and a low C:N ratio results in soil C loss to the atmosphere. Our hypothesis was to use biochar as a manure nutrient stabilizer that would slowly release nutrients to plants upon biochar-swine manure mixture application to soil. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of biochar-treated swine manure on soil total C, N, and plant-available macro- and micronutrients in greenhouse-cultivated corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Neutral pH red oak ...


Maize Nitrogen Management Using Reactive Sensor And Proactive Maize-N Model Via Fertigation, Mohammed A. Naser 2021 Al-Muthanna University & University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Maize Nitrogen Management Using Reactive Sensor And Proactive Maize-N Model Via Fertigation, Mohammed A. Naser

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Applying a portion of total nitrogen (N) during the growing season has the potential to improve nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by achieving greater synchrony between N supply and crop N demand, allowing for responsive adjustments to actual field conditions. Three studies from 2017-2019 evaluated using reactive sensor and proactive Maize-N model for determining in-season N requirements via fertigation in corn. The first study evaluated the integration of reactive sensor and proactive Maize-N model for determining the timing and rate of in-season N via fertigation. Overall, reactive and proactive fertigation treatments reduced total N applied by 35 to 65 kg N ...


Evaluation Of Broadcast Steam Application With Mustard Seed Meal In Fruiting Strawberry, Dong Sub Kim, Steven Kim, Steven A. Fennimore 2021 University of California, Davis

Evaluation Of Broadcast Steam Application With Mustard Seed Meal In Fruiting Strawberry, Dong Sub Kim, Steven Kim, Steven A. Fennimore

Mathematics and Statistics Faculty Publications and Presentations

Soil disinfestation with steam has potential to partially replace fumigants such as methyl bromide, chloropicrin, and 1,3-dichloropropene because it is effective, safer to apply, and has less negative impact on the environment. Here, we compared the efficacy of steam and steam + mustard seed meal (MSM) to chloropicrin on soil disinfection, plant growth, and fruit yield in a strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) fruiting field. The MSM was applied at 3368 kg·ha−1 before the steam application. Steam was injected into a 3-m-wide reverse tiller that was set to till 30 to 40 cm deep. Soil temperatures at depths of 10 ...


Effects Of Solid Matrix One-Step Planting Practice On Cool Season Turfgrass Germination In Unfavorable Conditions, Ben Duncan 2021 Western Kentucky University

Effects Of Solid Matrix One-Step Planting Practice On Cool Season Turfgrass Germination In Unfavorable Conditions, Ben Duncan

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

The transition zone in the United States is a difficult area to grow and establish turfgrasses. To establish or repair damaged turfgrass areas, seed priming is an often-used practice. Turfgrass companies and researchers are expanding the practice of solid matrix priming to the practice of one step planting. These products contain seed, fertilizers, and often some type of inert matter and/or mulch. This study took place in Bowling Green, KY and Knoxville, TN during the same period to investigate the effects of using these one step planting products compared to standard cool season turfgrass seeding practices. Two Pennington and ...


Soil Erosion Modelling: A Bibliometric Analysis, Nejc Bezak, Matjǎz Mikǒs, Pasquale Borrelli, Christine Alewell, Dinesh Panday, Panos Panagos, 59 co-authors 2021 University of Ljubljana

Soil Erosion Modelling: A Bibliometric Analysis, Nejc Bezak, Matjǎz Mikǒs, Pasquale Borrelli, Christine Alewell, Dinesh Panday, Panos Panagos, 59 Co-Authors

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

Soil erosion can present a major threat to agriculture due to loss of soil, nutrients, and organic carbon. Therefore, soil erosion modelling is one of the steps used to plan suitable soil protection measures and detect erosion hotspots. A bibliometric analysis of this topic can reveal research patterns and soil erosion modelling characteristics that can help identify steps needed to enhance the research conducted in this field. Therefore, a detailed bibliometric analysis, including investigation of collaboration networks and citation patterns, should be conducted. The updated version of the Global Applications of Soil Erosion Modelling Tracker (GASEMT) database contains information about ...


Pie/Decorative Pumpkin Cultivar Evaluation, Chris Smigell, John Strang, John Snyder, Emily Pfeufer, Bob Perry, Emily DeWitt 2021 University of Kentucky

Pie/Decorative Pumpkin Cultivar Evaluation, Chris Smigell, John Strang, John Snyder, Emily Pfeufer, Bob Perry, Emily Dewitt

Midwest Vegetable Trial Reports

Fourteen pie and decorative pumpkin cultivars were evaluated in a replicated trial to determine their performance under Central Kentucky growing conditions. Plants were grown using standard commercial growing practices, using raised beds with trickle tube irrigation and fertigation, and covered with black plastic film. Fungicides and insecticides were applied following University of Kentucky Extension guidelines. Yields per-acre, fruit dimensions, weights and sugar contents were measured. Cultivars were also evaluated for visual attributes, such as size- and color uniformity and stem attractivness. Bisbee Gold’, ‘Baby Wrinkles’, ‘Darling’, ‘Fall Splendor Plus’, ‘Jack Sprat’, ‘Little Giant’ and ‘Cinnamon Girl’ were the best overall ...


Diagnostic Walkabouts: Seventeen Years Of Specialized Training For Horticultural Professionals, Timothy J. Malinich, Jacqueline Kowalski, Charles Behnke 2021 The Ohio State University

Diagnostic Walkabouts: Seventeen Years Of Specialized Training For Horticultural Professionals, Timothy J. Malinich, Jacqueline Kowalski, Charles Behnke

Journal of Extension

A diagnostic walkabout (DW) is an in-field diagnostic training program for professionals in the green industry (greenhouse, landscape, nursery, and turf businesses). DWs have been scheduled annually since 2002 and are easily replicable, fee-based programs that provide cost recovery. DWs also serve as a mentoring program for new Extension educators. Four generations of Extension Educators have participated. Recently, the annual program has been sponsored by state and regional trade associations. What began as an educational outreach program has become a bridge spanning Extension, trade associations, businesses, and generations of Extension educators.


A Microbiome Engineering Framework To Evaluate Rhizobial Symbionts Of Legumes, Kenjiro W. Quides, Hagop S. Atamian 2021 Chapman University

A Microbiome Engineering Framework To Evaluate Rhizobial Symbionts Of Legumes, Kenjiro W. Quides, Hagop S. Atamian

Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles and Research

Background

For well over a century, rhizobia have been recognized as effective biofertilizer options for legume crops. This has led to the widespread use of rhizobial inoculants in agricultural systems, but a recurring issue has emerged: applied rhizobia struggle to provide growth benefits to legume crops. This has largely been attributed to the presence of soil rhizobia and has been termed the ‘rhizobial competition problem.’

Scope

Microbiome engineering has emerged as a methodology to circumvent the rhizobial competition problem by creating legume microbiomes that do not require exogenous rhizobia. However, we highlight an alternative implementation of microbiome engineering that focuses ...


Wayne E. Sabbe Arkansas Soil Fertility Studies 2020, Nathan A. Slaton 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Wayne E. Sabbe Arkansas Soil Fertility Studies 2020, Nathan A. Slaton

Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Series

Rapid technological changes in crop management and production require that the research efforts be presented in an expeditious manner. The contributions of soil fertility and fertilizers are major production factors in all Arkansas crops. The studies described within will allow producers to compare their practices with the university’s research efforts. Additionally, soil-test data and fertilizer sales are presented to allow comparisons among years, crops, and other areas within Arkansas.


Nebline, March 2021, 2021 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Nebline, March 2021

The NEBLINE Newsletter Archive from UNL Extension in Lancaster County

Naturally Occurring Elements in Groundwater - Part 1 of a Series — Calcium and Magnesium

Celebrate National Nutrition Month

RECIPE OF THE MONTH

2021 All-America Selections Vegetable Winners

Starting Seeds Indoors

Garden Guide Things to Do This Month

Planning for Spring Calving Season

Chemigation Trainings

2021 Nebraska On-Farm Research Annual Results Update Meetings

Houseplants: Simple Solutions to Plant Pests

Heart of 4-H Volunteer Award: Whitney Lehn

Meet 2020–2021 4-H Council

4-H Announcements for 4-H'ers and Volunteers

Private Pesticide Applicator Trainings by Zoom

EXTENSION CALENDAR

Upcoming Early Childhood Trainings


Cultivating Hops For Cone Production In Nebraska, Stacy A. Adams 2021 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Cultivating Hops For Cone Production In Nebraska, Stacy A. Adams

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

The hop cone is the primary product of agronomic value when growing Humulus lupulus L. (common hop). Cones are modified stem and leaf structures that protect the female flower cluster that forms chemical compounds important for flavoring beer and other uses. The majority of hops in the United States (~96%) is grown in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. Hops can be grown in very diverse climates, but it is the climatic consistency of the Pacific NW that provides product consistency and reasoning commercial hops production is prevalent in the region. Hops is a niche crop outside of the ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress