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Survival In An Urbanized Landscape: Radio-Tracking Fledgling Eastern Bluebirds (Sialia Sialis) On Golf Courses, Allyson Kathleen Jackson 2010 College of William & Mary - Arts & Sciences

Survival In An Urbanized Landscape: Radio-Tracking Fledgling Eastern Bluebirds (Sialia Sialis) On Golf Courses, Allyson Kathleen Jackson

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Transforming Growth Factor - Beta (Tgfß) Stimulated Isoform Specific Activation Of Akt2 Via Ras Mediates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (Emt), Praveen Chander 2010 Cleveland State University

Transforming Growth Factor - Beta (Tgfß) Stimulated Isoform Specific Activation Of Akt2 Via Ras Mediates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (Emt), Praveen Chander

ETD Archive

TGFß induces epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) accompanied by cellular differentiation and migration. EMT has emerged as a fundamental process governing embryonic development, adult tissue homeostasis and metastatic progression. Our lab had earlier identified a post-transcriptional pathway by which TGFß modulates expression of EMT-specific proteins. It was shown that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP E1) binds a structural, 33 nucleotides (nt) TGF beta-activated translation (BAT) element in the 3'-UTR of disabled-2 (Dab2) and interleukin-like EMT inducer (ILEI)transcripts, and repress their translation. This inhibition is removed following hnRNP E1 phosphorylation by activated Akt2. We now show that specific activation of Akt2 ...


Functional Properties Of The Hiv-1 Subtype C Envelope Glycoprotein Associated With Mother-To-Child Transmission, Hong Zhang, Marzena Rola, John T. West, Damien C. Tully, Piotr Kubis, Jun He, Chipepo Kankasa, Charles Wood 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Functional Properties Of The Hiv-1 Subtype C Envelope Glycoprotein Associated With Mother-To-Child Transmission, Hong Zhang, Marzena Rola, John T. West, Damien C. Tully, Piotr Kubis, Jun He, Chipepo Kankasa, Charles Wood

Virology Papers

Understanding the properties of viruses capable of establishing infection during perinatal transmission of HIV-1 is critical for designing effective means of limiting transmission. We previously demonstrated that the newly transmitted viruses (in infant) were more fit in growth, as imparted by their envelope glycoproteins, than those in their corresponding mothers. Here, we further characterized the viral envelope glycoproteins from six mother-infant transmission pairs and determined whether any specific envelope functions correlate with HIV-1 subtype C perinatal transmission. We found that most newly transmitted viruses were less susceptible to neutralization by their maternal plasma compared to contemporaneous maternal viruses. However, the ...


Enhancement Of Autophagy During Lytic Replication By The Kaposi’S Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication And Transcription Activator, Hui-Ju Wen, Zhilong Yang, You Zhou, Charles Wood 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Enhancement Of Autophagy During Lytic Replication By The Kaposi’S Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication And Transcription Activator, Hui-Ju Wen, Zhilong Yang, You Zhou, Charles Wood

Virology Papers

Autophagy is one of two major degradation systems in eukaryotic cells. The degradation mechanism of autophagy is required to maintain the balance between the biosynthetic and catabolic processes and also contributes to defense against invading pathogens. Recent studies suggest that a number of viruses can evade or subvert the host cell autophagic pathway to enhance their own replication. Here, we investigated the effect of autophagy on the KSHV (Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus) life cycle. We found that the inhibition of autophagy reduces KSHV lytic reactivation from latency, and an enhancement of autophagy can be detected during KSHV lytic replication. In ...


Weed Control In Organic Cropping Systems, Stephen L. Young 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Weed Control In Organic Cropping Systems, Stephen L. Young

West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

Organic producers and many conventional producers rank weed control as their number one production cost. For organic producers particularly, weed control has become increasingly important as organic production has increased its market share. According to the USDA Census of Agriculture, in 2005, for the first time, all 50 states had certified organic farmland, with over 1.6 million total ha (4 million acres) dedicated to organic production systems. In 2006, four major universities in the United States offered new degree programs in organic agriculture with the anticipation that, in five to six years, organic crops will comprise 5 to 10 ...


Price Discovery In Nebraska Cattle Markets, Matt Stockton, David A. Bessler, Roger K. Wilson 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Price Discovery In Nebraska Cattle Markets, Matt Stockton, David A. Bessler, Roger K. Wilson

West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

Monthly observations on prices from 10 weight/gender classifications of Nebraska beef cattle are studied in an error correction model (ECM) framework. This study attempts a replication of the 2003 paper on Texas prices by Bessler and Davis, where they find medium heifers (600–700 lb) at the center of price discovery. Using the ECM results Nebraska light steers are found to be weakly exogenous, with the innovation accounting results showing marked differences. Industry structure, production choices, and animal type and breeding herd differences between Texas and Nebraska are proposed as plausible reasons for partial (or incomplete) success at replication.


Effects Of Maternal Nutrition On Conceptus Growth And Offspring Performance: Implications For Beef Cattle Production, Richard N. Funston, David M. Larson, K. A. Vonnahme 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Effects Of Maternal Nutrition On Conceptus Growth And Offspring Performance: Implications For Beef Cattle Production, Richard N. Funston, David M. Larson, K. A. Vonnahme

West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

Developmental programming is the concept that a maternal stimulus or insult at a critical period in fetal development has long-term effects on the offspring. Historically, considerable effort has been made to understand how nutrition influences health and productivity during the postnatal period. Whereas maternal nutrition during pregnancy plays an essential role in proper fetal and placental development, less is known about how maternal nutrition affects the health and productivity of the offspring. Conceptus growth is sensitive to direct and indirect effects of maternal dietary intake. Even from the earliest stages of embryonic life, when nutrient requirements for conceptus growth are ...


Estrus Synchronization And Periconceptual Supplementation Affect The Profitability Of A Replacement Heifer Enterprise, D. M. Larson, R. D. Richardson, K. H. Ramsay, R. N. Funston 2010 University of Nebraska West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

Estrus Synchronization And Periconceptual Supplementation Affect The Profitability Of A Replacement Heifer Enterprise, D. M. Larson, R. D. Richardson, K. H. Ramsay, R. N. Funston

West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

Experiments evaluated estrus synchronization and periconceptual supplementation on pregnancy rate and calf production. Approximately one-half of heifers in 2 pastures (yr 1) or 4 pastures (yr 2) were injected with prostaglandin F (PGF; n = 1,182) or not (NPGF; n = 1,208) 5 d after fertile bulls were introduced for 25 d. In yr 2, a total of 1,230 heifers were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 pastures; 2 received a supplement providing 100 g/d of Ca propionate (1.4 kg/d, 20% CP) 2 d before through 19 d after bull exposure and 2 did not ...


Pollen Interception By Linyphiid Spiders In A Corn Agroecosystem: Implications For Dietary Diversification And Risk-Assessment, Julie A. Peterson, Susan Romero, James D. Harwood 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Pollen Interception By Linyphiid Spiders In A Corn Agroecosystem: Implications For Dietary Diversification And Risk-Assessment, Julie A. Peterson, Susan Romero, James D. Harwood

West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

Dietary diversification, including consumption of plant tissues such as pollen, can enhance the fecundity of generalist predators, resulting in improved control of pest prey. Supplemental pollen feeding has been observed in many natural enemies, including sheet-web spiders (Araneae: Linyphiidae), which represent a major component of food webs in agroecosystems. Their horizontal, ground-based webs have the potential to intercept pollen grains during anthesis of crop plants, providing the opportunity for consumption of pollen to occur. In laboratory feeding trials, Frontinella communis and Tennesseellum formicum (Araneae: Linyphiidae) readily fed on pollen grains dusted on their webs, with 82 and 92% of spiders ...


Crop Residue Cover Effects On Evaporation, Soil Water Content, And Yield Of Deficit‐Irrigated Corn In West‐Central Nebraska, Simon van Donk, Derrel L. Martin, Suat Irmak, Steven R. Melvin, Jim Peterson, Don Davison 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Crop Residue Cover Effects On Evaporation, Soil Water Content, And Yield Of Deficit‐Irrigated Corn In West‐Central Nebraska, Simon Van Donk, Derrel L. Martin, Suat Irmak, Steven R. Melvin, Jim Peterson, Don Davison

West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

Competition for water is becoming more intense in many parts of the U.S., including west‐central Nebraska. It is believed that reduced tillage, with more crop residue on the soil surface, conserves water, but the magnitude of water conservation is not clear. A study was initiated on the effect of residue on soil water content and corn yield at North Platte, Nebraska. The experiment was conducted in 2007 and 2008 on plots planted to field corn (Zea mays L.). In 2005 and 2006, soybean was grown on these plots. There were two treatments: residue‐covered soil and bare soil ...


Meeting The Common Needs Of A More Effective And Efficient Testing And Assessment Paradigm For Chemical Risk Management, Steven P. Bradbury, Vicki Dellarco, Tala Henry, Phil Sayre, Jennifer Seed 2010 Iowa State University

Meeting The Common Needs Of A More Effective And Efficient Testing And Assessment Paradigm For Chemical Risk Management, Steven P. Bradbury, Vicki Dellarco, Tala Henry, Phil Sayre, Jennifer Seed

Steven P. Bradbury

Significant advances have been made in human health and ecological risk assessment over the last decade. Substantial challenges, however, remain in providing credible scientific information in a timely and efficient manner to support chemical risk assessment and management decisions. A major challenge confronting risk managers is the need for critical information to address risk uncertainties in large chemical inventories such as high- and medium-production-volume industrial chemicals or pesticide inert ingredients. From a strategic and tactical viewpoint, an integrated approach that relies on all existing knowledge and uses a range of methods, including those from emerging and novel technologies, is needed ...


Application Of The Tissue Residue Approach In Ecological Risk Assessment, Steven P. Bradbury, Keith G. Sappington, Todd S. Bridges, Russell J. Erickson, A. Jan Hendriks, Roman P. Lanno, James P. Meador, David R. Mount, Mike H. Salazar, Doug J. Spry 2010 Radboud University

Application Of The Tissue Residue Approach In Ecological Risk Assessment, Steven P. Bradbury, Keith G. Sappington, Todd S. Bridges, Russell J. Erickson, A. Jan Hendriks, Roman P. Lanno, James P. Meador, David R. Mount, Mike H. Salazar, Doug J. Spry

Steven P. Bradbury

The objective of this work is to present a critical review of the application of the tissue residue approach (TRA) in ecological risk and/or impact assessment (ERA) of chemical stressors and environmental criteria development. A secondary goal is to develop a framework for integrating the TRA into ecological assessments along with traditional, exposure concentration-based assessment approaches. Although widely recognized for its toxicological appeal, the utility of the TRA in specific applications will depend on numerous factors, such as chemical properties, exposure characteristics, assessment type, availability of tissue residue-response data, and ability to quantify chemical exposure. Therefore, the decision to ...


Tillage System And Fertilizer Placement Methods For Corn And Soybean Production, Antonio P. Mallarino, Ryan Rusk 2010 Iowa State University

Tillage System And Fertilizer Placement Methods For Corn And Soybean Production, Antonio P. Mallarino, Ryan Rusk

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

No-till management results in little or no incorporation of crop residues and fertilizer with soil. Subsurface banding phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) fertilizers with planter attachments or before planting could be more effective than broadcast fertilization because both nutrients accumulate at or near the soil surface. A long-term study was initiated in 1994 to evaluate P and K fertilizer placement for corn and soybean managed with no-till and chisel-plow tillage.


2009 Home Demonstration Gardens, Cynthia L. Haynes 2010 Iowa State University

2009 Home Demonstration Gardens, Cynthia L. Haynes

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Vegetable gardening is increasingly popular in today’s economy, especially since there is the potential to save money by growing food at home. One of the themes for the 2009 Home Demonstration Garden was vegetables that have the potential to reduce grocery bills. Certain vegetables such as potatoes, winter squash, onions, tomatoes, beans, and beets can be stored or processed, allowing them to be kept long after harvest. Other themes featured in the 2009 Home Demonstration Garden were white pumpkins, annual grasses, and new or unusual flowers.


Corn Residue Removal Effects On Grain Yield And Soil Quality, Mark A. Licht 2010 Iowa State University

Corn Residue Removal Effects On Grain Yield And Soil Quality, Mark A. Licht

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

In recent years there has been a greater focus on removing corn residue from fields following harvest. The two main reasons are for use as a low cost feedstuff for cattle production and for future use in cellulosic ethanol production. This leads to the question “What effects will there be from removing corn residue following harvest?” This trial was set up to address potential soil quality concerns as well as look at impacts on grain yield.


Fungicide And Insecticide Study On Soybean, Nathan R. Bestor, Rebecca Ritson, Daren S. Mueller, Alison E. Robertson, Matthew E. O'Neal 2010 Iowa State University

Fungicide And Insecticide Study On Soybean, Nathan R. Bestor, Rebecca Ritson, Daren S. Mueller, Alison E. Robertson, Matthew E. O'Neal

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

The study was designed to optimize insecticide and fungicide usage on soybean by comparing different products applied at different timings. To explain yield responses, foliar disease severity and aphid populations were assessed throughout the season.


Weed Management Programs In Corn, Michael D. Owen, James F. Lux, Damian D. Franzenburg, Dean M. Grossnickle 2010 Iowa State University

Weed Management Programs In Corn, Michael D. Owen, James F. Lux, Damian D. Franzenburg, Dean M. Grossnickle

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

The purpose of this study was to evaluate various herbicides and application timings in corn for crop injury and weed control.


Northwest And Allee Farms Summary, Ryan Rusk 2010 Iowa State University

Northwest And Allee Farms Summary, Ryan Rusk

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Includes:

Northwest Research Farm Summary

Allee Demonstration Farm Summary


Seasonal And Rotational Influences On Corn Nitrogen Requirements, John E. Sawyer, Daniel W. Barker 2010 Iowa State University

Seasonal And Rotational Influences On Corn Nitrogen Requirements, John E. Sawyer, Daniel W. Barker

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

This project was designed to study the N fertilization needs in continuous corn (CC) and corn rotated with soybean (SC) as influenced by location and climate. Multiple rates of N fertilizer are spring applied, with the intent to measure yield response to N within each rotation on a yearly basis for multiple years at multiple sites across Iowa. This will allow the determination of N requirements for each rotation, differences that exist between the two rotations, responses to applied N across different soils and climatic conditions, and evaluation of tools used to adjust N application.


Tile Spacing Results, Greg Brenneman 2010 Iowa State University

Tile Spacing Results, Greg Brenneman

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

In 1999, a 45-acre tile spacing project was installed adjacent to the Southeast Research Farm. This was done through donations by local drainage contractors, tile companies, and with assistance from the staff at the Southeast Research Farm. The goal was to compare recommended tile spacing (75 ft) with closer tile spacings.


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