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Molecular Basis Of A Novel Adaptation To Hypoxic-Hypercapnia In A Strictly Fossorial Mole, Kevin L. Campbell, Jay F. Storz, Anthony V. Signore, Hideaki Moriyama, Kenneth C. Catania, Alexander P. Payson, Joseph Bonaventura, Jörg Stetefeld, Roy E. Weber 2010 University of Manitoba

Molecular Basis Of A Novel Adaptation To Hypoxic-Hypercapnia In A Strictly Fossorial Mole, Kevin L. Campbell, Jay F. Storz, Anthony V. Signore, Hideaki Moriyama, Kenneth C. Catania, Alexander P. Payson, Joseph Bonaventura, Jörg Stetefeld, Roy E. Weber

Jay F. Storz Publications

Background: Elevated blood O2 affinity enhances survival at low O2 pressures, and is perhaps the best known and most broadly accepted evolutionary adjustment of terrestrial vertebrates to environmental hypoxia. This phenotype arises by increasing the intrinsic O2 affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb) molecule, by decreasing the intracellular concentration of allosteric effectors (e.g., 2,3-diphosphoglycerate; DPG), or by suppressing the sensitivity of Hb to these physiological cofactors.

Results: Here we report that strictly fossorial eastern moles (Scalopus aquaticus) have evolved a low O2 affinity, DPG-insensitive Hb - contrary to expectations for a mammalian species that is adapted ...


Phenotypic Plasticity And Genetic Adaptation To High-Altitude Hypoxia In Vertebrates, Jay F. Storz, Graham R. Scott, Zachary A. Cheviron 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Phenotypic Plasticity And Genetic Adaptation To High-Altitude Hypoxia In Vertebrates, Jay F. Storz, Graham R. Scott, Zachary A. Cheviron

Jay F. Storz Publications

High-altitude environments provide ideal testing grounds for investigations of mechanism and process in physiological adaptation. In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the acclimatization response to high-altitude hypoxia derives from studies of animal species that are native to lowland environments. Such studies can indicate whether phenotypic plasticity will generally facilitate or impede adaptation to high altitude. Here, we review general mechanisms of physiological acclimatization and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in birds and mammals. We evaluate whether the acclimatization response to environmental hypoxia can be regarded generally as a mechanism of adaptive phenotypic plasticity, or whether it might sometimes represent ...


Genetic Differences In Hemoglobin Function Between Highland And Lowland Deer Mice, Jay F. Storz, Amy M. Runck, Hideaki Moriyama, Roy E. Weber, Angela Fago 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Genetic Differences In Hemoglobin Function Between Highland And Lowland Deer Mice, Jay F. Storz, Amy M. Runck, Hideaki Moriyama, Roy E. Weber, Angela Fago

Jay F. Storz Publications

In high-altitude vertebrates, adaptive changes in blood–O2 affinity may be mediated by modifications of hemoglobin (Hb) structure that affect intrinsic O2 affinity and/or responsiveness to allosteric effectors that modulate Hb–O2 affinity. This mode of genotypic specialization is considered typical of mammalian species that are high-altitude natives. Here we investigated genetically based differences in Hb–O2 affinity between highland and lowland populations of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), a generalist species that has the broadest altitudinal distribution of any North American mammal. The results of a combined genetic and proteomic analysis revealed that deer ...


A Signal-Substrate Match In The Substrate-Borne Component Of A Multimodal Courtship Display, Damian O. Elias, Andrew C. Mason, Eileen Hebets 2010 University of California, Berkeley

A Signal-Substrate Match In The Substrate-Borne Component Of A Multimodal Courtship Display, Damian O. Elias, Andrew C. Mason, Eileen Hebets

Eileen Hebets Publications

The environment can impose strong limitations on the efficacy of signal transmission. In particular, for vibratory communication, the signaling environment is often extremely heterogeneous at small scales. Nevertheless, natural selection is expected to select for signals well-suited for effective transmission. Here, we test for substrate-dependent signal efficacy in the wolf spider Schizocosa stridulans Stratton 1991. We first explore the transmission characteristics of this important signaling modality by playing recorded substrate-borne signals through three different substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and red clay) and measuring the propagated signal. We found that the substrate-borne signal of S. stridulans attenuates the least on ...


Multimodal Courtship Efficacy Of Schizocosa Retrorsa Wolf Spiders: Implications Of An Additional Signal Modality, Aaron S. Rundus, Roger D. Santer, Eileen Hebets 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Multimodal Courtship Efficacy Of Schizocosa Retrorsa Wolf Spiders: Implications Of An Additional Signal Modality, Aaron S. Rundus, Roger D. Santer, Eileen Hebets

Eileen Hebets Publications

Here, we simultaneously examine both content and efficacy-based sources of selection on the visual and seismic multimodal courtship display of the wolf spider Schizocosa retrorsa. Immature field-collected S. retrorsa were reared in the laboratory on either high-quantity diet (HD) or low-quantity diet (LD) treatments. On maturation, females of each diet treatment were run in simultaneous mate choice trials with both a HD and an LD male (content-based selection). Simultaneous mate choice trials were conducted across different signaling environments (efficacy-based selection) in a fully crossed 2 × 2 design with visual treatments of light/dark (visual signal present/absent) and seismic treatments ...


Mate Choice And Learning, Eileen Hebets, Laura Sullivan-Beckers 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Mate Choice And Learning, Eileen Hebets, Laura Sullivan-Beckers

Eileen Hebets Publications

While an individual’s genetic framework is a major contributor in determining its eventual mate choice, the role of the environment in further influencing mating decisions has long been recognized. Animals gather information from the environment throughout life, and in some cases, may apply this information to increase their odds of obtaining a high-quality mate. In short, these individuals learn. Moreover, such learning can have a social component. “Social learning” is a general term that describes any learning based on observing, interacting with, and/or imitating others in a social context. Social learning can transmit information vertically, generation to generation ...


No Interaction Between Competition And Herbivory In Limiting Introduced Cirsium Vulgare Rosette Growth And Reproduction, Tomomi Suwa, Svata M. Louda, F. Leland Russell 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

No Interaction Between Competition And Herbivory In Limiting Introduced Cirsium Vulgare Rosette Growth And Reproduction, Tomomi Suwa, Svata M. Louda, F. Leland Russell

Svata M. Louda Publications

Both competition and herbivory have been shown to reduce plant survival, growth, and reproduction. Much less is known about whether competition and herbivory interact in determining plant performance, especially for introduced, weedy plant species in the invaded habitat. We simultaneously evaluated both the main and interactive effects of plant neighbors and insect herbivory on rosette growth and seed reproduction in the year of flowering for Cirsium vulgare (bull thistle, spear thistle), an introduced Eurasian species, in tallgrass prairie in 2 years. Effects of insect herbivory were strong and consistent in both years, causing reduced plant growth and seed production, whereas ...


Evolutionary Aspects Of Urea Utilization By Fungi, Dhammika H. M. L. P Navarathna, Steven D. Harris, David D. Roberts, Kenneth W. Nickerson 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Evolutionary Aspects Of Urea Utilization By Fungi, Dhammika H. M. L. P Navarathna, Steven D. Harris, David D. Roberts, Kenneth W. Nickerson

Kenneth Nickerson Papers

The higher fungi exhibit a dichotomy with regard to urea utilization. The hemiascomycetes use urea amidolyase (DUR1,2), whereas all other higher fungi use the nickel-containing urease. Urea amidolyase is an energy-dependent biotincontaining enzyme. It likely arose before the Euascomycete/Hemiascomycete divergence c. 350 million years ago by insertion of an unknown gene into one copy of a duplicated methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase (MccA). The dichotomy between urease and urea amidolyase coincides precisely with that for the Ni/Co transporter (Nic1p), which is present in the higher fungi that use urease and is absent in those that do not. We suggest ...


Candida Albicans Cellwall Components And Farnesol Stimulate The Expression Of Both Inflammatory And Regulatory Cytokines In The Murine Raw264.7 Macrophage Cell Line, Suman Ghosh, Nina Howe, Katie Volk, Swetha Tati, Kenneth W. Nickerson, Thomas M. Petro 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Candida Albicans Cellwall Components And Farnesol Stimulate The Expression Of Both Inflammatory And Regulatory Cytokines In The Murine Raw264.7 Macrophage Cell Line, Suman Ghosh, Nina Howe, Katie Volk, Swetha Tati, Kenneth W. Nickerson, Thomas M. Petro

Kenneth Nickerson Papers

Candida albicans causes candidiasis, secretes farnesol, and switches from yeast to hyphae to escape from macrophages after phagocytosis. However, before escape, macrophages may respond to C. albicans’ pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and dectin-1 receptors by expressing cytokines involved in adaptive immunity, inflammation, and immune regulation. Therefore, macrophages and the RAW264.7 macrophage line were challenged with C. albicans preparations of live wild-type cells, heat-killed cells, a live mutant defective in hyphae formation, a live mutant producing less farnesol, or an isolate producing farnesoic acid instead of farnesol. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1b, IL- 10, and tumor ...


Waterfowl Of North America: Black & White Photographs (Following Page 210), Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Black & White Photographs (Following Page 210), Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Fulvous Whistling Duck, Pair
Cuban Whistling Duck, Pair
Black-bellied Whistling Duck, Pair
Mute Swan, Subadult
Mute Swan, Adults
Trumpeter Swan, Pair
Whistling Swan, Adult
White-fronted Goose, Adult
White-fronted Goose, Adult
Lesser Snow Goose, Adult
Lesser Snow Goose, Adults
Ross Goose, Adults
Emperor Goose, Adult
Aleutian Canada Goose, Adult
Cackling Canada Goose, Adult
Atlantic Canada Goose, Pair
Baffin Island Canada Goose, Pair
Barnacle Goose, Female and brood
Pacific Brant Goose, Pair at nest
Pacific Brant Goose, Adult
Muscovy Duck, Adult male
Wood Duck, Adult male
Wood Duck, Pair resting
European Wigeon, Adult males
European Wigeon, Pair
American Wigeon, Adult male
American ...


Waterfowl Of North America: Index, Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Index, Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

English vernacular names of waterfowl indexed here are in general those used in this book for species or larger groupings. Vernacular names for subspecies are only indexed to those pages where they may be listed among the subspecies included in the species accounts. Pages that include the primary discussions of each species are indicated by boldface under the species' vernacular name and its scientific name. Species other than waterfowl are not indexed.

acuta, Anas, 257-267
[through]
Wood Duck, 13, 14, 16, 20, 24,28, 35, 161, 169-180, 480, 486, 490; map, 172


Waterfowl Of North America: Black & White Photographs (Following Page 338), Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Black & White Photographs (Following Page 338), Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Gadwall, Pair
Gadwall, Adult male
Baikal Teal, Pair
American Green-winged Teal, Pair
Baikal Teal, Adult male
American Green-winged Teal, Adult male
Common Mallard, Adult male
Common Mallard, Brooding female
Mexican Mallard, Pair
Florida Mallard, Pair
Northern Pintail, Adult male
Bahama Pintail, Adult male
Garganey, Adult male
Garganey, Pair
Blue-winged Teal, Pair
Cinnamon Teal, Pair
Northern Shoveler, Adult male
Northern Shoveler, Pair
Canvasback, Adult female
Canvasback, Pair
Redhead, Adult male
Redhead, Adult female
Ring-necked Duck, Pair
Ring-necked Duck, Pair
Tufted Duck, Pair
Greater Scaup, Pair
Greater Scaup, Adult male
Lesser Scaup, Pair
American Common Eider, Adult males
American Common Eider, Group ...


Waterfowl Of North America: Black & White Photographs (Following Page 450), Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Black & White Photographs (Following Page 450), Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Steller Eider, Pair
Spectacled Eider, Adult female
Spectacled Eider, Adult male
Oldsquaw, Male in Summer
Oldsquaw, Male in Winter
Oldsquaw, Female in late Spring
Harlequin Duck, Adult male
Harlequin Duck, Pair
American Black Scoter, Male (Courtesy Felix Neck Wildlife Trust)
European Black Scoter, Pair
Surf Scoter, Male (San Diego Zoo Photo)
Surf Scoter, Pair
White-winged Scoter, Male (Courtesy Felix Neck Wildlife Trust)
White-winged Scoter, Adult female
Bufflehead, Adult males
Bufflehead, Pair
Barrow Goldeneye, Adult male
Common Goldeneye, Pair
Common Goldeneye, Courting pair
Smew, Pair
Smew, Adult male
Hooded Merganser, Adult female
Hooded Merganser, Adult male
Red-breasted Merganser, Adult male
Red-breasted ...


Waterfowl Of North America: Color Photographs (Following Page 50), Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Color Photographs (Following Page 50), Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Trumpeter Swan, Adult (drinking)
Lesser Snow Goose (Blue Phase), Adult and young
Lesser Canada Goose, Adults
Atlantic Brant, Adult
Barnacle Goose, Adults
Wood Duck, Adult Male
American Wigeon, Pair
Gadwall, Pair
Green-winged Teal, Pair
Mexican Mallard, Adult Male
Florida Mallard, Pair
Northern Pintail, Pair
Blue-winged Teal, Pair
Cinnamon Teal, Pair
Shoveler, Pair
Canvasback, Pair
Redhead, Pair
Ring-necked Duck, Pair
Greater Scaup, Pair
King Eider, Pair
Steller Eider, Adults
Harlequin Duck,Male
Surf Scoter, Male
Bufflehead, Pair
Barrow Goldeneye, Pair
Common Goldeneye, Pair
Hooded Merganser, Displaying Male
Red-breasted Merganser, Male
Common Merganser, Pair
Ruddy Duck, Male


Waterfowl Of North America: Name Derivations, Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Name Derivations, Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Excluding extralimital species and most subspecies unless these are sometimes considered full species.

Aix [through] Spatula


Waterfowl Of North America: Stiff-Tailed Ducks Tribe Oxyurini, Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Stiff-Tailed Ducks Tribe Oxyurini, Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

This bizarre group of diving ducks differs from the rest of the Anatidae in so many respects that by any standard it demands special attention. Of the eight species that are presently recognized, most are placed in the genus Oxyura, which name refers to the stiffened, elongated tail feathers typical of the group. In these species the tail feathers extend well beyond the rather short tail coverts and are usually narrow-vaned, so that the individual rectrices tend to separate when spread. The feet are unusually large, and the legs are placed farther to the rear of the body than in ...


Waterfowl Of North America: Sources, Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Sources, Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Approximately 500 citations.

See also the updated bibliography in the 2010 supplement: "North America’s Ducks, Geese and Swans in the 21st Century"


Transgenic Rat Model Of Neurodegeneration Caused By Mutation In The Tdp Gene, Hongxia Zhou, Cao Huang, Han Chen, Dian Wang, Carlisle P. Landel, Pedro Yuxing Xia, Robert Bowser, Yong-Jian Liu, Xu Gang Xia 2010 Thomas Jefferson University

Transgenic Rat Model Of Neurodegeneration Caused By Mutation In The Tdp Gene, Hongxia Zhou, Cao Huang, Han Chen, Dian Wang, Carlisle P. Landel, Pedro Yuxing Xia, Robert Bowser, Yong-Jian Liu, Xu Gang Xia

Papers from the Nebraska Center for Biotechnology

TDP-43 proteinopathies have been observed in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 (i.e., TDP) have been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in frontotemporal lobe degeneration associated with motor neuron disease. To study the consequences of TDP mutation in an intact system, we created transgenic rats expressing normal human TDP or a mutant form of human TDP with a M337V substitution. Overexpression of mutant, but not normal, TDP caused widespread neurodegeneration that predominantly affected the motor system. TDP mutation reproduced ALS phenotypes in transgenic rats, as seen by progressive degeneration of motor ...


Waterfowl Of North America: Frontmatter & Preface, Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Waterfowl Of North America: Frontmatter & Preface, Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Contents
Lists of tables and maps
List of plates
Preface

It was with a considerable degree of hesitation that, during the winter of 1970-71, I sat down and contemplated the scope and structure of a possible book on the waterfowl of North America. On my bookshelf behind me were copies of A. C. Bent's Life Histories of North American Wild Fowl, F. H. Kortright's The Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North America, and Jean Delacour's The Waterfowl of the World. My task, as I saw it, was to try to develop a book that might be useful ...


North America’S Ducks, Geese And Swans In The 21st Century: A 2010 Supplement To Waterfowl Of North America, Paul A. Johnsgard 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

North America’S Ducks, Geese And Swans In The 21st Century: A 2010 Supplement To Waterfowl Of North America, Paul A. Johnsgard

Waterfowl of North America, Revised Edition (2010)

Since the 1975 publication of Waterfowl of North America, a great deal of ornithological literature has appeared concerning North American ducks, geese & swans. The most significant of these are the species accounts in the American Ornithologists’ Union The Birds of North America (B.O.N.A.) series, 46 of which were published between 1993 and 2003, and which include all the species known to breed in the United States and Canada (see references).

Population data of wild species are constantly changing, and sometimes of limited accuracy, but long-term averages or trends are often significant. National population surveys such as the annual U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Breeding Bird Surveys, and annual hunter-kill (“harvest”) surveys by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Canadian Wildlife Service are thus of both immediate and long-term interest.

Text updates for the following species accounts are minimal. I have stressed apparent population trends and identified new major literature sources. I have also modified the majority of the range maps to make them more closely conform to our present-day knowledge of breeding and wintering ranges. The breeding ranges of some species are still inadequately known, such as those of the scoters, which breed in large regions of Canada and Alaska that are still only poorly surveyed. Not only have breeding ranges changed or become clearer, but also many wintering ranges have changed markedly since the 1970s, in conjunction with global warming trends (Johnsgard, 2009; Niven, Butcher & Bancroft, 2009).


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