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The Use Of High Frequency Gps Data To Classify Main Behavioural Categories In A Przewalski’S Horse In The Mongolian Gobi, Petra Kaczensky, Klaus Huber 2010 University of Veterinary Medicine

The Use Of High Frequency Gps Data To Classify Main Behavioural Categories In A Przewalski’S Horse In The Mongolian Gobi, Petra Kaczensky, Klaus Huber

Erforschung biologischer Ressourcen der Mongolei / Exploration into the Biological Resources of Mongolia, ISSN 0440-1298

Behavioral observations of free ranging animals can provide important insight into many aspects of their biology but are not without problems. The recent development of GPS technology allows to remotely collect high precision location data at fixed intervals. We tested whether it is possible to classify the behavior of a Przewalski’s horse in the Mongolian Gobi into Resting, Grazing and Moving based on GPS locations collected at 15 minute intervals by comparing GPS data with direct observations. Although behavioral categories lasting for 15 minutes could by fairly reliably separated based on the distances covered between successive fixes, almost half ...


Characteristics Of Mongolian Wild Ass Hooves (Equus Hemionus Hemionus), Jan Gahsche, Michael Stubbe, Matthias Oppermann, N. Batsajchan, Annegret Stubbe 2010 Klitten, Germany

Characteristics Of Mongolian Wild Ass Hooves (Equus Hemionus Hemionus), Jan Gahsche, Michael Stubbe, Matthias Oppermann, N. Batsajchan, Annegret Stubbe

Erforschung biologischer Ressourcen der Mongolei / Exploration into the Biological Resources of Mongolia, ISSN 0440-1298

Measurements of hoof angles, hoof length, toe length, etc., and non-metrical hoof characters of Mongolian Wild Ass carcasses collected in in the South Gobi and in Bordzongijn-Gobi desert are presented. Khulan hooves are flat, wide and look big in relation to the animal’s dimensions. Remarkably is the wide variability in size, angles, in non metric characteristics like shape, color and the occurrence of particularly prolonged hoof wall and flaring walls. For example, toe angles are 52° for front and 54° for hind hooves on average. This measures and the suggested graphical model of the „ideal hoof shape“ can assist ...


Beobachtungen Zu Unterscheidungsmerkmalen An Equidenschädeln, Speziell Zwischen Denen Von Mongolischen Dschiggetai Und Pferden, Roland Müller, Joachim Wussow 2010 Martin-Luther-Universität

Beobachtungen Zu Unterscheidungsmerkmalen An Equidenschädeln, Speziell Zwischen Denen Von Mongolischen Dschiggetai Und Pferden, Roland Müller, Joachim Wussow

Erforschung biologischer Ressourcen der Mongolei / Exploration into the Biological Resources of Mongolia, ISSN 0440-1298

First paragraph:

Von STUBBE et.al. wurden zwischen 2001 und 2004 in der Südmongolei ca. 400 Schädel des Dschiggetai (Equus hemionus hemionus) gesammelt.


Temporal Dynamics Of Group Size And Sexual Segregation In Ibex, N. J. Singh, S. Amgalanbaatar, Richard P. Reading 2010 Imperial College London

Temporal Dynamics Of Group Size And Sexual Segregation In Ibex, N. J. Singh, S. Amgalanbaatar, Richard P. Reading

Erforschung biologischer Ressourcen der Mongolei / Exploration into the Biological Resources of Mongolia, ISSN 0440-1298

Group size is an important variable describing behavioral ecology of animals. A variety of factors such as habitat characteristics, life history, spatio-temporal resource dynamics, population density, predation risk, competition with kin, and social learning often determine group size in large mammals. We studied temporal dynamics of group size in Siberian ibex (Capra sibirica) in a protected area in Mongolia. We measured monthly and yearly variations in typical group size and used the sexual segregation and aggregation statistic to assess sexual segregation. Ibex formed the largest groups in November and smallest groups in July. However, group sizes did not significantly differ ...


A Review Of The Blaesiina (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae, Gymnetini), Brett C. Ratcliffe 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

A Review Of The Blaesiina (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae, Gymnetini), Brett C. Ratcliffe

Papers in Entomology

The two genera comprising the subtribe Blaesiina (Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Gymnetini) are reviewed. Each genus contains two species, with Blaesia Burmeister occurring in southern South America and Halffterinetis Morón & Nogueira occurring in northern Mexico. Descriptions, keys, distributions, biology, and illustrations are provided. The biogeography of the Blaesiina is discussed with a hypothesis to explain the current disjunct distributions. I provide a new state record for Halffterinetis gonzaloi Morón & Nogueira in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.


Synopsis Of The Aroid Scarabs In The Genus Peltonotus Burmeister (Scarabaeidae, Dynastinae, Cyclocephalini) From Sumatra And Description Of A New Species, Mary Liz Jameson, Stanislav Jakl 2010 Wichita State University

Synopsis Of The Aroid Scarabs In The Genus Peltonotus Burmeister (Scarabaeidae, Dynastinae, Cyclocephalini) From Sumatra And Description Of A New Species, Mary Liz Jameson, Stanislav Jakl

Papers in Entomology

We provide a synopsis of the Sumatran species in the scarab beetle genus Peltonotus Burmeister (Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini), describe a new species of Peltonotus from Sumatra, and describe the male of P. cybele Jameson & Wada from Sumatra (previously known only by the female holotype). To enable identification, we include a key to the five Sumatran species of Peltonotus, comparative images and diagnoses for all species, and temporal and geographical distributions.


A Revision Of The Argentinean Endemic Genus Eucranium Brullé (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) With Description Of One New Species And New Synonymies, Federico C. Ocampo 2010 CCT-CONICET Mendoza

A Revision Of The Argentinean Endemic Genus Eucranium Brullé (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) With Description Of One New Species And New Synonymies, Federico C. Ocampo

Papers in Entomology

The South American genus Eucranium Brullé has been revised and now includes six species: E. arachnoides Brullé, E. belenae Ocampo new species, E. cyclosoma Burmeister, E. dentifrons Guérin-Méneville, E. planicolle Burmeister, and E. simplicifrons Fairmaire. Eucranium pulvinatum Burmeister is a new junior synonym of Eucranium arachnoides Brullé, and Eucranium lepidum Burmeister is a new junior synonym of E. dentifrons Guérin-Méneville. The following lectotypes and neotypes are designated: Eucranium pulvinatum Burmeister, lectotype; Eucranium planicolle Burmeister, lectotype; Psammotrupes dentifrons Guérin-Méneville, neotype; and Eucranium lepidum Burmeister, neotype. Description of the genus and new species, diagnosis and illustrations, and distribution maps are provided for ...


The South American Dung Beetle Genus Ennearabdus Lansberge (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Eucraniini), Federico C. Ocampo 2010 CCT-CONICET, Mendoza

The South American Dung Beetle Genus Ennearabdus Lansberge (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Eucraniini), Federico C. Ocampo

Papers in Entomology

The South American endemic dung beetle genus Ennearabdus Lansberge is revised. Description, diagnosis and illustrations are presented for the only known species of the genus, E. lobocephalus (Harold). A lectotype is designated for Onthophagus lobocephalus Harold, the type species of Ennearabdus. The biology, biogeography, conservation status, and distribution based on the predictive distribution model of E. lobocephalus are also discussed.


Comparison Of Percent Hatch And Fungal Infestation In Channel Catfish Eggs After Copper Sulfate, Diquat Bromide, Formalin, And Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment, Andrew J. Mitchell, David L. Straus, Bradley Farmer, Ray Carter 2010 United States Department of Agriculture

Comparison Of Percent Hatch And Fungal Infestation In Channel Catfish Eggs After Copper Sulfate, Diquat Bromide, Formalin, And Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment, Andrew J. Mitchell, David L. Straus, Bradley Farmer, Ray Carter

Publications from USDA-ARS / UNL Faculty

Reduced survival of fish eggs is often a result of infestation with fungi Saprolegnia spp. However, timely chemical treatments often limit these infestations and increase survival. The effect of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CSP; 10 mg of CSP/L of water), diquat bromide (25 mg of diquat cation/L), formalin (433 mg/L), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 250 mg/L) on percent hatch and fungal infestation in eggs of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was compared in two identical trials (five replicates for each chemical treatment per trial). The percent hatch in all chemical treatments was significantly better than ...


Pedigree Analyses Of The Mississippi Sandhill Crane, JESSICA R. HENKEL 2010 University of New Orleans

Pedigree Analyses Of The Mississippi Sandhill Crane, Jessica R. Henkel

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

The genetic status of the critically endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was analyzed using 2008 studbook data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service managed captive breeding and release program. Since the captive breeding program was established in 1964, gene diversity has decreased 6%, average mean kinship is at the level of first cousin, and inbreeding coefficients have been observed as high as 0.375. These high inbreeding levels were correlated with lower survivorship, and an analysis of the mate suitability of current pairs at the release site revealed poor mate suitability indices. These factors may be ...


Thirty Years Of Mortality Assessment In Whooping Crane Reintroductions: Patterns And Implications, BARRY K. HARTUP, MARILYN G. SPALDING, NANCY J. THOMAS, GRETCHEN A. COLE, YOUNG JUN KIM 2010 International Crane Foundation

Thirty Years Of Mortality Assessment In Whooping Crane Reintroductions: Patterns And Implications, Barry K. Hartup, Marilyn G. Spalding, Nancy J. Thomas, Gretchen A. Cole, Young Jun Kim

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

We reviewed postmortem data to identify primary causes of mortality in reintroduced whooping cranes (Grus americana) and assess their potential for mitigation in future reintroduction efforts. In total, 240 cases from 3 populations were reviewed for causes of death, including the Rocky Mountain migratory population (n = 24, release dates 1975-1989), the Florida resident population (n = 186, 1993-2005), and the Wisconsin migratory population (n = 30, 2001-ongoing). Traumatic injury was the leading cause of mortality among the reintroduced whooping cranes, most commonly from predation (n = 120 or 50%, range 8-58% per project) or collision with fixed structures such as electrical power lines ...


Methods To Reduce Crop Depredation By Cranes In Siberia (Trans-Baikal Region), OLEG A. GOROSHKO 2010 Daursky State Nature Biosphere Reserve, Chita Institute of Natural Resources

Methods To Reduce Crop Depredation By Cranes In Siberia (Trans-Baikal Region), Oleg A. Goroshko

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Methods of reducing crop depredation by cranes were tested in Daursky State Nature Biosphere Reserve on the steppes of southern Siberia. The Torey Lakes and numerous small lakes support autumn gathering of cranes and waterfowl. Croplands (mainly oats and wheat) attract staging cranes, geese, and ducks. Up to 42,000 demoiselle (Anthropoides virgo) and 1,100 hooded cranes (Grus monacha) (>10% of world populations for these species) can feed in the fields near the reserve and cause significant damage (up to 70% in some wheat fields). We investigated the problem during 1992-2004 and suggested various methods to reduce damage. The ...


Impacts Of Global And Regional Climate On Whooping Crane Demography: Trends And Extreme Events, KARINE GIL, WILLIAM GRANT, R. DOUGLAS SLACK, ENRIQUE WEIR 2010 Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust

Impacts Of Global And Regional Climate On Whooping Crane Demography: Trends And Extreme Events, Karine Gil, William Grant, R. Douglas Slack, Enrique Weir

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

We analyzed long-term demographic and environmental data to understand the role of large scale climatic factors (the Pacific Decadal Oscillations [PDO]) and environmental factors in 3 regions of North America on natality and mortality of the remnant migratory whooping crane (Grus americana) population. This is an endangered species that spends winters at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Texas, breeds at Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP) in Canada and “…uses Nebraska as a primary stopover”. Long term data (27 years) of demography and environmental factors (PDO index, temperature and precipitation at WBNP, Nebraska and ANWR, pond water depth at WBNP ...


An Individual Whooping Crane's Family History, KARINE GIL, FELIPE CHAVEZ-RAMIREZ, BRIAN W. JOHNS, THOMAS V. STEHN, ROBIN SILVA 2010 Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust

An Individual Whooping Crane's Family History, Karine Gil, Felipe Chavez-Ramirez, Brian W. Johns, Thomas V. Stehn, Robin Silva

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Between 1977 and 1988, 12 cohorts (134 individuals) of whooping cranes (Grus americana) were banded in Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP, Canada-breeding ground) and monitored from Canada to Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR, Texas-wintering ground). During 2004, historical data on banded individuals was analyzed to estimate population parameters and life table of the wild population. This study used information from one of the few banded cranes known to be alive in 2008 since 1978. A genealogy tree (Family Tree Maker software) was developed from individual RwR-nil to represent its descendents and relatives, as well as a map (GIS) for geographic ...


Icf Conservation Education: Bridging Crane Conservation And The International Education Community, JOAN GARLAND, KORIE KLINK 2010 International Crane Foundation

Icf Conservation Education: Bridging Crane Conservation And The International Education Community, Joan Garland, Korie Klink

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Education, at multiple levels with audiences in Wisconsin, Florida, Texas, and along the flyways where sandhill (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G. americana) sometimes find themselves in close quarters with people, is the key to protecting North America's cranes. The migration of these birds highlights the dependence of cranes and other wildlife on wetlands along the migration routes. Most of these wetlands are privately owned, so the decisions and conservation outlook of future generations are critical to the survival of these cranes. The International Crane Foundation's (ICF) conservation education programs and materials focus on the importance of crane ...


Evaluating The Effects Of Pinyon Thinning Treatments At A Wildland Urban Interface, J. R. Matchett, Matthew L. Brooks, Anne Halford, Dale Johnson, Helen Smith 2010 US Geological Survey

Evaluating The Effects Of Pinyon Thinning Treatments At A Wildland Urban Interface, J. R. Matchett, Matthew L. Brooks, Anne Halford, Dale Johnson, Helen Smith

JFSP Research Project Reports

This study evaluated the short-term effects of thinning methods for pinyon pine woodlands at two sites in the southwestern Great Basin. Both cut/pile/burn and mastication treatments were equally effective at reducing the target fuels which were mature, live pinyon trees. Application costs though differed substantially, with the cut/pile/burn technique being less expensive. Thinning treatments increased the abundance of herbaceous vegetation, although in some cases the strength of the increase was constrained by the level of pre-treatment tree dominance. Increases in perennial grass cover and density in response to thinning were usually greatest at lower levels of ...


Exploring The Traditional Use Of Fire In The Coastal Mountains Of Central California, Brent E. Johnson, Rand R. Everett, Kent G. Lightfoot, Charles J. Stiplen 2010 University of California

Exploring The Traditional Use Of Fire In The Coastal Mountains Of Central California, Brent E. Johnson, Rand R. Everett, Kent G. Lightfoot, Charles J. Stiplen

JFSP Research Project Reports

This study brought together a team of ecologists, archaeologists, environmental historians, indigenous peoples, and land managers within a research framework combining an ethnographic investigation of traditional practices with cutting-edge paleoecological techniques to answer questions about Indian utilization of fire as an ecological and cultural landscape management tool in Central Coastal California. The study was designed around four key elements: (1) examining fire regimes for research sites using a combination of fire scar dendrochronology, phytoliths, archaeology, historical information, and traditional ecological knowledge; (2) attempting to formalize a methodology for using phytoliths to estimate the fire return interval and intensity in grassland ...


Fire Regimes Of The Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal And Spatial Variability Over Multiple Scales And Implications For Ecosystem Management, Charles W. Lafon, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Sally P. Horn, Robert N. Klein 2010 Texas A&M University

Fire Regimes Of The Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal And Spatial Variability Over Multiple Scales And Implications For Ecosystem Management, Charles W. Lafon, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Sally P. Horn, Robert N. Klein

JFSP Research Project Reports

Information about historic fire regimes and the departure of current fire regimes from historic conditions is essential for guiding and justifying management actions, such as prescribed burning programs for ecosystem process restoration and fuel reduction. Such information is noticeably lacking for the southern Appalachian Mountains, where human populations are encroaching onto wildland areas, and where decades of fire exclusion have contributed to the decline of fire-associated communities and also to altered fuel loads. We address this knowledge gap via a multi-scale investigation of the variability in fire regimes over time and space using tree-ring reconstructions of fire history and stand ...


Fuel Consumption And Smoke Emissions From Landscape-Scale Burns In Eastern Hardwoods, Matthew Dickinson, Ann Acheson, Robert Kremens 2010 US Forest Service

Fuel Consumption And Smoke Emissions From Landscape-Scale Burns In Eastern Hardwoods, Matthew Dickinson, Ann Acheson, Robert Kremens

JFSP Research Project Reports

Our project used remotely-sensed infrared radiation measurements to estimate fuel consumption in eastern mixed-oak forests and facilitated the development of smoke management expertise and processes for complying with EPA regulations in Ohio and Kentucky. As a result of two workshops, Ohio developed a Smoke Management Plan designed to ensure that best management practices were being used across land ownerships and to facilitate mandated information sharing with the Ohio EPA and US EPA. Ohio also established a Prescribed Fire Council as a result of this process. Kentucky opted for a less formal response to EPA regulations, establishing a Prescribed Fire Council ...


Developing And Using Fire Scar Histories In The Southern And Eastern United States, Richard P. Guyette, Martin Spetich, Daniel C. Dey 2010 University of Missouri-Columbia

Developing And Using Fire Scar Histories In The Southern And Eastern United States, Richard P. Guyette, Martin Spetich, Daniel C. Dey

JFSP Research Project Reports

Land managers developing fire management plans in the eastern and southern United States lack quantitative information on historic fire regimes. Twelve new fire histories were developed from dated fire scars on trees from regions where no fire scar history data had existed before in the states of Alabama, Louisiana, Kentucky, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Michigan. Sites represent highly variable climates from extreme cold (with long snow cover duration) to subtropical. All sites utilized oak or pine recorder species that were collected from closed forest to open savanna structures. Pre-industrial mean fire intervals ranged from 3 to more than 35 years at ...


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