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Causes Of Embryonic Death In Captive Whooping Cranes, JULIA N. LETOUTCHAIA, KELLY MAGUIRE, BARRY K. HARTUP 2010 Michigan State University

Causes Of Embryonic Death In Captive Whooping Cranes, Julia N. Letoutchaia, Kelly Maguire, Barry K. Hartup

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

In 2001, the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team and the Whooping Crane Health Advisory Team reemphasized the need for analysis of embryonic deaths within captive breeding flocks to identify preventable deaths and promote increased production of chicks for release programs. We conducted a retrospective study of egg necropsy reports to identify causes of death among developing whooping crane (Grus americana) embryos from captivity. Records from 44 egg necropsies conducted at the International Crane Foundation (ICF) between 2001 and 2008 were reviewed. The eggs were of captive origin (ICF, n = 40; Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, n = 3; Calgary Zoo, n = 1 ...


Population Status And Geographic Distribution Of Greater Sandhill Cranes In The Mid-Continent Population, Gary L. Krapu, David A. Brandt 2010 U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Population Status And Geographic Distribution Of Greater Sandhill Cranes In The Mid-Continent Population, Gary L. Krapu, David A. Brandt

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Number and geographic distribution of greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in the mid-continent population (MCP) of sandhill cranes were evaluated. G. c. tabida comprised 7 of 133 (5.3%) individuals of 3 subspecies which projects to 31,579 ± 11,661 (SE) individuals in an estimated spring MCP of 600,000 cranes. From a platform transmitting terminal (PTT)-marked sample representative of the geographic distribution of G. c. tabida, 10 of 13 (77%) settled during the breeding season in east-central Canada/Minnesota, including 4 in northwestern Minnesota, 4 in Manitoba (2 at sites near the Minnesota border), and 2 in ...


Continued Evaluation Of Post-Fire Recovery And Treatment Effectiveness For Validation Of The Ermit Erosion Model, Peter R. Robichaud, William J. Elliot, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Sarah A. Lewis, Louise E. Ashmun, Peter M. Wohlgemuth, Robert E. Brown 2010 USDA Forest Service

Continued Evaluation Of Post-Fire Recovery And Treatment Effectiveness For Validation Of The Ermit Erosion Model, Peter R. Robichaud, William J. Elliot, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Sarah A. Lewis, Louise E. Ashmun, Peter M. Wohlgemuth, Robert E. Brown

JFSP Research Project Reports

The use and cost of post-fire emergency stabilization treatments continues to grow. To help maximize the impact of these treatments, many assessment teams use the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) erosion model to predict postfire erosion and mitigation effects. However, despite several completed JFSP projects, the long-term effects of these treatments remain unknown, and the ERMiT model has not been validated. Long-term post-fire erosion and runoff data on a variety of mulches and erosion barriers were collected using 12 existing sites throughout the Western U.S. The agricultural straw and wood strand mulch treatments were very effective at reducing erosion ...


Countability Of Sandhill Cranes In Aerial Surveys, DOUGLAS H. JOHNSON, JOHN W. SOLBERG, COURTNEY L. AMUNDSON 2010 USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Countability Of Sandhill Cranes In Aerial Surveys, Douglas H. Johnson, John W. Solberg, Courtney L. Amundson

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Aerial surveys are used to monitor populations of many wildlife species, including sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis). In addition to the usual problems of detectability (involving both availability and perceptibility), aerial surveys of concentrated animals are subject to countability issues; from a rapidly moving aircraft, observers cannot count or accurately estimate the number of animals in a large group. Calibration is sometimes performed in an effort to adjust aerial counts for incomplete detectability and countability by calculating the ratio of animals actually in a group to the number in the group estimated from the aircraft. Here we explore alternative, model-based approaches ...


Aerial Survey Techniques For Breeding Whooping Cranes, BRIAN W. JOHNS 2010 Canadian Wildlife Service

Aerial Survey Techniques For Breeding Whooping Cranes, Brian W. Johns

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Since the discovery of nesting whooping cranes in Wood Buffalo National Park, the Canadian Wildlife Service has conducted aerial surveys to monitor the population. Aerial survey techniques have varied over the years; however, they have generally followed the techniques used by the author since 1991. The technique involves flying a combination of circular flights and transects over known nesting territories and similar looking marshes likely to contain breeding whooping cranes. These aerial surveys account for nearly 100% of the breeding whooping cranes each year.


Winter Distribution Of Greater Sandhill Cranes Marked At Breeding Areas In California, Oregon, And Washington, GARY L. IVEY, JOSEPH D. ENGLER, MARTIN J. ST. LOUIS, MARK A. STERN, SEAN CROSS 2010 International Crane Foundation

Winter Distribution Of Greater Sandhill Cranes Marked At Breeding Areas In California, Oregon, And Washington, Gary L. Ivey, Joseph D. Engler, Martin J. St. Louis, Mark A. Stern, Sean Cross

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Large numbers of greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) have been banded and color-marked at several important breeding sites in the western U.S. since the late 1960s. Crane color-marking began in the late 1960s at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in eastern Oregon. Crane marking programs were initiated at Sycan Marsh, Summer Lake Wildlife Area (both in south-central Oregon), as well as at Modoc NWR in the mid-1980s. In the mid-1990s, a marking program was initiated at Conboy Lake NWR in south-central Washington. This paper reviews winter records and distribution of marked birds from these sites within the Central ...


Whooping Crane Migrational Habitat Use Of The Platte River, Nebraska, 2001-2006, SHAY HOWLIN, CLAYTON DERBY, DALE STRICKLAND 2010 Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc.

Whooping Crane Migrational Habitat Use Of The Platte River, Nebraska, 2001-2006, Shay Howlin, Clayton Derby, Dale Strickland

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

The Platte River Endangered Species Partnership monitored whooping crane (Grus americana) habitat use along the Platte River between Chapman and Lexington, Nebraska during 11 migration seasons from 2001 to 2006. Daily aerial surveys took place in the morning from 21 March to 29 April in the spring and from 9 October to 10 November in the fall. Decoy detection trials were conducted during each of the 11 survey seasons to calculate actual sample inclusion probabilities for crane groups detected during monitoring flights. The detectability model found significant differences in detectability among strata (upland or channel), contractor, and altitude of the ...


Mississippi Sandhill Crane Conservation Update 2006-2008, SCOTT G. HEREFORD, LAUREN E. BILLODEAUX 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

Mississippi Sandhill Crane Conservation Update 2006-2008, Scott G. Hereford, Lauren E. Billodeaux

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

The Mississippi sandhill crane (MSC, Grus canadensis pulla) is an endangered non-migratory subspecies found in the wild only on and near the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge (MSCNWR) in Jackson County in southeastern Mississippi (Gee and Hereford 1995). The MSC is adapted to the wet pine savannas and open pinelands of the Southeastern Outer Gulf Coastal Plain. By the 1970s, their numbers had decreased to 30-40 individuals including only 5-6 nesting pairs. The firemaintained savannas, once a dominant feature of the landscape, were converted to pine plantations and human development or had degraded to overgrown pine scrub. The MSCNWR ...


Home Range Size And Habitat Use Of Mississippi Sandhill Crane Colts, SCOTT G. HEREFORD, TRACY E. GRAZIA, JEREME N. PHILLIPS, GLENN H. OLSEN 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

Home Range Size And Habitat Use Of Mississippi Sandhill Crane Colts, Scott G. Hereford, Tracy E. Grazia, Jereme N. Phillips, Glenn H. Olsen

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Recruitment in the endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) is minimal, with the population of 110 sustained by an annual augmentation of captive-reared juveniles. Suitability of available habitat quality is likely involved in nesting success. Thousands of hectares of pine savanna were restored for crane use, but it is not clear how much was being used by crane families. We used 3-g subcutaneous transmitters to radio-tag 27 colts over 6 years from 1998 to 2002 and 2004 to determine home range and habitat use. Using a hand-held receiver, H-antenna and standard triangulation, location data were collected twice daily along ...


The Role Of Retrieval And Translocation In A Reintroduced Population Of Migratory Whooping Cranes, SARA E. ZIMORSKI, RICHARD P. URBANEK 2010 International Crane Foundation

The Role Of Retrieval And Translocation In A Reintroduced Population Of Migratory Whooping Cranes, Sara E. Zimorski, Richard P. Urbanek

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

Beginning in 2001, a reintroduction project was initiated using captive-reared whooping cranes (Grus americana) to establish a migratory flock in eastern North America. From May 2003 to August 2008, 23 of these birds were retrieved and translocated in 15 separate events. These individuals consisted of 14 cranes that had been led to Florida by ultralight aircraft on their first autumn migration (UL) and 9 cranes that had been directly released in autumn in Wisconsin (DAR). Of 104 (86 UL and 18 DAR) reintroduced individuals that eventually departed from their release location, 22% were later retrieved 1-3 times. Lake Michigan posed ...


The Direct Autumn Release Of Whooping Cranes Into The Eastern Migratory Population: A Summary Of The First Three Years, MARIANNE M. WELLINGTON, RICHARD P. URBANEK 2010 International Crane Foundation

The Direct Autumn Release Of Whooping Cranes Into The Eastern Migratory Population: A Summary Of The First Three Years, Marianne M. Wellington, Richard P. Urbanek

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

This paper describes methods used in an experimental direct autumn release of captive produced whooping cranes (Grus americana) into a reintroduced migratory population in eastern North America. Eighteen chicks (4 in 2005, 4 in 2006, and 10 in 2007) were eventually released in the vicinity of adult whooping cranes or wild sandhill cranes (G. canadensis). Chicks were reared by costumed aviculturists using strict isolation-rearing techniques at the International Crane Foundation (ICF) and then transferred to Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in central Wisconsin. Initially, 23 chicks were transferred from ICF to Necedah at ages of 17-46 days. Isolation-rearing techniques continued in ...


Survival, Reproduction, And Movements Of Migratory Whooping Cranes During The First Seven Years Of Reintroduction, RICHARD P. URBANEK, LARA E. A. FONDOW, SARA E. ZIMORSKI 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Survival, Reproduction, And Movements Of Migratory Whooping Cranes During The First Seven Years Of Reintroduction, Richard P. Urbanek, Lara E. A. Fondow, Sara E. Zimorski

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

An effort to reintroduce a migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana) into eastern North America began in 2001. During 2001-2007, 125 juveniles were costume/isolation-reared and released: 106 were led by ultralight aircraft from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), central Wisconsin, to Chassahowitzka NWR, central Gulf Coast of Florida, on their first autumn migration (ultralight-led or UL). The remaining 19 individuals were released directly on Necedah NWR during autumn of the hatch year (direct autumn release or DAR). Of 86 UL and 13 DAR cranes that completed their first spring migration, 72 (84%) and 5 (38%), respectively, returned unassisted ...


Development Of The Whooping Crane Tracking Project Geographic Information System, MARTHA TACHA, ANDY BISHOP, JUSTIN BREI 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Development Of The Whooping Crane Tracking Project Geographic Information System, Martha Tacha, Andy Bishop, Justin Brei

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

The highest losses in the Aransas-Wood Buffalo whooping crane population occur during migration. Conservation and recovery of the endangered whooping crane requires understanding of migration patterns to identify important stopover areas and potential sources of mortality or disturbance. We converted the Cooperative Whooping Crane Tracking Project database, containing more than 3 decades of data on whooping crane sightings, to a geographic information system (GIS) to allow coarse scale spatial analyses of whooping crane migration patterns in the United States portion of the Central Flyway. At this writing, the geodatabase contains point data for 1,981 confirmed whooping crane sightings through ...


Changes In Winter Whooping Crane Territories And Range 1950-2006, THOMAS V. STEHN, FELIPE PRIETO 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Changes In Winter Whooping Crane Territories And Range 1950-2006, Thomas V. Stehn, Felipe Prieto

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

The whooping crane (Grus americana) winters on the Texas coast primarily in salt marsh habitat. The location of adult whooping crane winter territories during 9 winters between 1950 and 2006 was derived from aerial census data digitized onto infrared photos using GIS software. Range expansion, including changes in distribution and size of winter territories, was analyzed over a 57-year period as flock size increased by 765%. Crane pairs have opted to establish territories in or close to the traditional winter area rather than moving long distances along the coast. This distribution seems based on the preference of the male crane ...


Reproductive Health And Performance Of The Florida Flock Of Introduced Whooping Cranes, MARILYN G. SPALDING, MARTIN J. FOLK, STEPHEN A. NESBITT, RICHARD KILTIE 2010 University of Florida

Reproductive Health And Performance Of The Florida Flock Of Introduced Whooping Cranes, Marilyn G. Spalding, Martin J. Folk, Stephen A. Nesbitt, Richard Kiltie

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

We retrospectively examined the reproductive parameters of 122 breeding-age whooping cranes (Grus americana) in a reintroduced flock in central Florida from 1992 to 2007. The flock performed poorly when compared with an existing wild flock for all reproductive parameters when controlled for age. Pairs first formed in 1995, nested in 1999, and the first chick fledged in 2002. By 2007, 19 of 63 clutches produced 25 chicks, 9 of which fledged. Drought conditions were ruled out as the sole cause of failure when the drought lessened and productivity increased, but not in all years. We examined adult health, mortality, gonad ...


Effectiveness Of Fuel Treatments For Mitigating Wildfire Severity: A Manager‐Focused Review And Synthesis, Philip N. Omi, Erik J. Martinson Mr. 2010 Omi Associates

Effectiveness Of Fuel Treatments For Mitigating Wildfire Severity: A Manager‐Focused Review And Synthesis, Philip N. Omi, Erik J. Martinson Mr.

JFSP Research Project Reports

The 2008 Request for Applications from the Joint Fire Science Program called for a synthesis of the extant literature that addresses the effectiveness of fuel treatments. We employed a four‐pronged approach to address this task, including several scoping exercises with land managers, a literature review, a meta‐analysis, and development of an online pictorial database.


A Retrospective Serological Survey For Infectious Bursal Disease Virus In Free-Ranging Sandhill Cranes In South-Central Wisconsin, RICHARD R. SIM, BARRY K. HARTUP 2010 University of Wisconsin

A Retrospective Serological Survey For Infectious Bursal Disease Virus In Free-Ranging Sandhill Cranes In South-Central Wisconsin, Richard R. Sim, Barry K. Hartup

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

A retrospective serosurvey of resident sandhill cranes (Grus candensis pratensis) in Florida suggested Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV, family Birnaviridae) may have been enzootic there as early as 1992, with 13-63% seroprevalence among age classes and wide geographic distribution of seropositive cranes. The purpose of our study was to describe the prevalence of antibodies to IBDV serotype 2 in a local population of greater sandhill cranes (G. c. tabida) near Briggsville, Wisconsin, that overlapped with resident Florida birds in winter during the same time period. Blood samples were collected June through October between 1996 and 1999 as part of a ...


Summary Of Sandhill Crane Hunting Seasons In Kansas 1993-2007, DAVID E. SHARP, HELEN M. HANDS, JAMES A. DUBOVSKY, JOHN E. CORNELY 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Summary Of Sandhill Crane Hunting Seasons In Kansas 1993-2007, David E. Sharp, Helen M. Hands, James A. Dubovsky, John E. Cornely

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

The mid-continent population of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) is the largest population of cranes in North America. Hunting seasons for sandhill cranes were closed in 1916 and gradually resumed in Mexico (1940), the United States (1961), and Canada (1964). As knowledge of the biology of cranes and experience with hunting seasons increased, areas in which hunting was permitted expanded, and by 1992 all but 2 states (Nebraska and Kansas) in the U.S. portion of the Central Flyway conducted sport hunting seasons for this population. In 1993 Kansas resumed hunting and initial seasons were limited to specified geographic areas of ...


An Enhanced Online Piled Fuels Biomass Calculator, Clinton S. Wright, Paige C. Eagle 2010 USDA Forest Service

An Enhanced Online Piled Fuels Biomass Calculator, Clinton S. Wright, Paige C. Eagle

JFSP Research Project Reports

A web-programming project was undertaken to allow users of the online Hand-piled Fuels Biomass Calculator to also estimate the volume, biomass and potential emissions of mechanically piled fuels. Machine pile calculations encoded in the decision support software CONSUME 3.0 were added to the online Calculator to achieve this objective. In addition, the ability to batch process piled fuels data was added to the online Calculator to ease data input for large analysis projects. A stand-alone version of the Calculator was developed for users without access to the Internet. As it is executed within a standard web browser (e.g ...


Sandhill Cranes Of Coastal British Columbia: Results Of Helicopter Surveys And Preliminary Observations Of Habitat Use, KRISTA ROESSINGH, BRIONY PENN 2010 University of Victoria

Sandhill Cranes Of Coastal British Columbia: Results Of Helicopter Surveys And Preliminary Observations Of Habitat Use, Krista Roessingh, Briony Penn

North American Crane Workshop Proceedings

A pilot study on sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) was conducted on the central coast of British Columbia in May 2006, followed by 2 summers of inventory and observation in 2007 and 2008. Fieldwork consisted of gathering local knowledge of crane locales, helicopter and boat surveys, and observations from blinds. We located 29 nest sites on 14 different islands and 1 mainland peninsula, as well as several beach foraging areas and bog roost sites. Observed average crane and nest density in areas of suitable habitat was 0.21/km2 and 0.044/km2, respectively, for 2007 and 2008. Nest ...


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