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Does Presentation Make A Difference To Risk Perception: Testing Different Formats For Communication Of Cancer Risks, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

Does Presentation Make A Difference To Risk Perception: Testing Different Formats For Communication Of Cancer Risks, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

Evidence suggests that the presentation format of risk information can affect people’s perceptions of risk and influence health-related decisions. In these studies we investigated the impact of four different risk presentation formats: standard presentation, risk ladder, different base rates and visual representations on women’s perceptions of developing breast cancer of lymphoma. We found that the different presentations had virtually no impact on the participant’s risk estimates. Only in the second study relating to risk perceptions for lymphoma was there a significant difference between conditions for estimated 10-year-risk, with those in the ladder present condition reporting a lower ...


Branding: An Adolescent Sun Protection Perspective, Melissa Lynch, Sandra C. Jones, Lyn Phillipson 2010 University of Wollongong

Branding: An Adolescent Sun Protection Perspective, Melissa Lynch, Sandra C. Jones, Lyn Phillipson

Sandra Jones

Australian adolescents are consistently found to exhibit low levels of adherence to sun protection guidelines, resulting in high levels of skin cancer incidence in later life. Given the importance of image, appearance, and peer approval factors in adolescent sun protection, this study sought to examine adolescents’ perceptions of the “sun protection brand,” its competing brands, and possible complementary brands. A series of 14 focus groups were conducted with adolescents in Years 9 and 10 (junior high school), and the results are examined in the context of potential branding-related marketing strategies to overcome some of the barriers to sun protection.


Putting The ‘Community’ Back Into Community Standards For Advertising, Katherine van Putten, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

Putting The ‘Community’ Back Into Community Standards For Advertising, Katherine Van Putten, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

The Advertising Standards Board passes judgments on complaints each year against what is referred to as prevailing community standards. There is however, no explicit definition of what these prevailing community standards are. This research found that there were two major issues that were of most concern to the public in regard to (un)acceptable advertising: the portrayal of women and the consequences of social marketing advertisements. Neither of these issues are adequately addressed by the current advertising Code of Ethics. The results of this research suggest there is an urgent need to develop a set of evidence based community standards ...


Are Negative Reactions To Sexist Appeals In Alcohol Advertisements A Function Of Feminism Or Gender?, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

Are Negative Reactions To Sexist Appeals In Alcohol Advertisements A Function Of Feminism Or Gender?, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

Anecdotal evidence suggests that the use of sexual appeals in alcohol advertising is increasing. It has been shown that the use of sex appeals may result in a more negative attitude towards the brand, particularly among female consumers. This study investigates the proposition that this is the effect of feminist ideology rather than, or in addition to, biological gender. The results show that female respondents have more negative attitudes towards alcohol advertisements utilizing overt (or demeaning) sexual appeals than males and more positive attitudes towards alcohol advertisements utilizing feminist (empowering) appeals than males; and that there is no consistent independent ...


Pop Promotions For Alcolhol: Increasing Brand Loyalty Or Just Increasing Binge Drinking?, Melissa Lynch, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

Pop Promotions For Alcolhol: Increasing Brand Loyalty Or Just Increasing Binge Drinking?, Melissa Lynch, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

The consumption of alcohol by young Australians in general, and at risky levels has increased. University students, as part of this group, display consistent and increasing risky drinking patterns. One key area of interest in understanding this situation is the use of alcohol advertising and marketing. Of particular interest to this research is the use of point-of-purchase promotions in licensed venues and the impact they may have on consumption. In order to help understand these promotions, focus groups were conducted with male university students between the age of 18 and 24 years from the University of Wollongong. Overall, the perception ...


Who Would The Australian Public Trust To Tell Them About Bird Flu? Results Of An Australia-Wide Cati Survey, Sandra C. Jones, L. Waters, Don C. Iverson 2010 University of Wollongong

Who Would The Australian Public Trust To Tell Them About Bird Flu? Results Of An Australia-Wide Cati Survey, Sandra C. Jones, L. Waters, Don C. Iverson

Sandra Jones

A potential bird flu pandemic is currently the cause of much debate worldwide. Successful control efforts will require effective risk communication, and the choice of credible spokespeople is critical to prevent panic and elicit the desired public responses. This paper reports the results of one Australia-wide CATI survey which examined the Australian public’s preferred sources of information on bird flu and credibility of spokespeople in the event of a bird flu pandemic in Australia. Our results indicate medical personnel and organisations are perceived by the public as being the most credible sources for delivering information about bird flu. These ...


Increasing The Efficacy Of Breast Cancer Risk Communications: Contributiolns From Behavioural Science And Marketing, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson 2010 University of Wollongong

Increasing The Efficacy Of Breast Cancer Risk Communications: Contributiolns From Behavioural Science And Marketing, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson

Sandra Jones

Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women in Australia. Women are faced with numerous decisions in relation to breast cancer including: actions they can take to reduce their risk of developing breast cancer; whether to participate in screening programs; and selection of the most appropriate treatment option if diagnosed with breast cancer. This paper discusses ways in which theories and findings from two disciplines, behavioural science and marketing, can be used collaboratively to design effective communications to increase the uptake of health behaviours that have the potential of reducing morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. From marketing ...


Children And The Internet: What Are "Safe" Websites Telling Our Kids About Food?, Sandra C. Jones, Belinda S. Fabrianesi 2010 University of Wollongong

Children And The Internet: What Are "Safe" Websites Telling Our Kids About Food?, Sandra C. Jones, Belinda S. Fabrianesi

Sandra Jones

Food advertising is a contentious issue in regards to childhood obesity and has increasing importance on the public policy agenda both in Australia and overseas. This study examines the nature and extent of food advertising/promotions on popular children’s websites. Three popular children’s websites were chosen: Total Girl, K-Zone and D-Mag. Each is linked to a top-selling magazine and targets children aged eight to12 years. The websites were monitored daily from 1-28 December 2005, with the increase or decrease of any food product advertisements recorded as well as any competitions, games, puzzles and recipes which promoted certain food ...


The Decline Of Ethics Or The Failure Of Self-Regulation? The Case Of Alcohol Advertising, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

The Decline Of Ethics Or The Failure Of Self-Regulation? The Case Of Alcohol Advertising, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

Restrictions on alcohol advertising have increasingly become an issue for debate around the world. Some countries rely on governmental regulation; whereas others, including Australia, utilise a system of industry selfregulation. This study calls into question the effectiveness of the alcohol beverage industry’s self-regulation of advertising. Between May 1998 and April 1999, 11 alcohol advertising complaints (relating to nine separate advertisements) were lodged with the Advertising Standards Board (ASB) by members of the general public. In the present study, five expert judges were selected to review these complaints, without knowing the ASB’s rulings, and to judge whether the advertisement ...


Measuring Source Credibility With Generation Y: An Application To Messages About Smoking And Alcohol Consumption, K. Smith, Sandra C. Jones, Jennifer Algie 2010 University of Wollongong

Measuring Source Credibility With Generation Y: An Application To Messages About Smoking And Alcohol Consumption, K. Smith, Sandra C. Jones, Jennifer Algie

Sandra Jones

In recent years there have been widespread media campaigns directed at communicating to young people the potential risks associated with excessive alcohol consumption and smoking. Increasingly, these messages are being developed by industry organisations as well as government and health agencies, raising questions as to the credibility of these industry sources. In this study, university students were provided with the names of fourteen sources of campaigns directed at encouraging responsible alcohol consumption and smoking cessation. We found that the overall rating was effective in terms of identifying the different levels of perceived credibility in regards to the sources, but examination ...


Message Framing Effects In Exercise Promotions: Confounded By Linguistic Complexity?, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

Message Framing Effects In Exercise Promotions: Confounded By Linguistic Complexity?, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

Studies of framing effects on health-related intentions and behaviour have been conducted in numerous areas, with contradictory results. These inconsistent results can be partially explained by the differential nature of the behaviours concerned, and by the degree to which people engage in detailed processing of the messages, but there is clearly more to learn about framing effects. This study compared the effectiveness of the communication approaches inherent in the four-cell framing model towards adopting a health-enhancing behaviour (exercise). However we found an atheoretical interaction effect caused by the linguistic complexity of the messages.


“Asthma? We Would Have Got It By Now If We Were Going To Get It!”:Implications For Social Marketing To The Over 65'S, Kelly Andrews, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

“Asthma? We Would Have Got It By Now If We Were Going To Get It!”:Implications For Social Marketing To The Over 65'S, Kelly Andrews, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

An investigation into the understanding and awareness of asthma in older adults was conducted in the Illawarra region of NSW. Results indicate that older adults are unaware of the prevalence and severity of asthma, have limited understanding of symptoms and treatments, and tend to associate the condition with children. Health care providers report that older people tend to accept or minimise respiratory symptoms as a natural part of ageing. A consumer focused social marketing approach to reducing asthma morbidity and mortality in the 65 and older age group reveals specific lines of action to changing voluntary behaviours in both older ...


The Influence Of Magazine Advertising On Parents' Nutrition Ratings Of Food Products For Children, Christina Hoang, Sandra C. Jones, Jennifer Thornton 2010 University of Wollongong

The Influence Of Magazine Advertising On Parents' Nutrition Ratings Of Food Products For Children, Christina Hoang, Sandra C. Jones, Jennifer Thornton

Sandra Jones

Childhood obesity currently affects approximately 22 million children under the age of five worldwide (Rochinni, 2002) and its increasing prevalence in developed nations makes it one of the most common nutritional problems among children (Sorof and Stephen, 2002). A study was conducted to investigate parents’ health-related perceptions for a series of magazine advertisements for commonly advertised and popular children’s food products. The study revealed that confusion exists among parents and this was most evident in relation to the energy content of food products. Parents are important due to the instrumental role they play in their child’s nutrition - both ...


Alcohol Energy Drinks: Engaging Young Consumers In Co-Creation Of Alcohol Related Harm, Sandra C. Jones, Lance Barrie 2010 University of Wollongong

Alcohol Energy Drinks: Engaging Young Consumers In Co-Creation Of Alcohol Related Harm, Sandra C. Jones, Lance Barrie

Sandra Jones

Alcohol-energy drinks are a relatively new entry to the alcohol market, but have rapidly gained popularity among young drinkers. Unfortunately, these products are also associated with higher levels of alcohol-related harm, including negative health effects and increased levels of aggression and violence. This paper reports on the social image functions served by these products, as perceived by university students; and suggests that there is a need to look beyond alcohol advertising to other factors that increase consumption – including pricing, distribution, use of social media, and consumer co-creation of brand image. Keywords: attitude, behaviour, experience, perception, public health, responsibility, alcohol


'Like Me, Want Me, Buy Me, Eat Me': Relationship-Building Marketing Communications In Children's Magazines, Sandra C. Jones, Nadia L. Mannino, Julia Green 2010 University of Wollongong

'Like Me, Want Me, Buy Me, Eat Me': Relationship-Building Marketing Communications In Children's Magazines, Sandra C. Jones, Nadia L. Mannino, Julia Green

Sandra Jones

Objective: Television, Internet and print media are saturated with advertisements for unhealthy food that use marketing tactics aimed to build long-term brand loyalty and ‘relationships’ with children. While research in this area has largely focused on television, the current study examines children’s responses to relationship-building marketing communications found in popular children’s magazines. Design: A qualitative study consisting of friendship-pair interviews in which children were interviewed and asked to comment on a range of recent food advertisements. Setting: A university-based after-school care programme in New SouthWales, Australia. Subjects: Ten children aged 6–13 years, interviewed in self-selected friendship pairs ...


Consumer Confusion: Parents Nutritional Perceptions Of Food Advertisements, Christina Hoang, Sandra C. Jones, Jennifer Thornton 2010 University of Wollongong

Consumer Confusion: Parents Nutritional Perceptions Of Food Advertisements, Christina Hoang, Sandra C. Jones, Jennifer Thornton

Sandra Jones

Due to the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity in society, this study was undertaken to determine if advertisers could potentially be misleading parents through the nutritional claims made in advertisements for popular children’s food products. Research was conducted to determine the sorts of nutritional messages parents received from four food advertisements. In total, 41 parents from an Australian university childcare centre participated in the study. The results revealed several major discrepancies whereby parents’ perceived unhealthy products to be healthy – indicating a degree of consumer confusion among parents.


An Exploratory Study On The Effect Of Positive (Warmth Appeal) And Negative (Guilt Appeal) Print Imagery On Donation Behaviour In Animal Welfare, M. Haynes, Jennifer Thornton, Sandra C. Jones 2010 University of Wollongong

An Exploratory Study On The Effect Of Positive (Warmth Appeal) And Negative (Guilt Appeal) Print Imagery On Donation Behaviour In Animal Welfare, M. Haynes, Jennifer Thornton, Sandra C. Jones

Sandra Jones

Very few studies in social marketing empirically compare the effectiveness of positive and negative appeals. This study examines the effect of positive (warmth appeal) and negative (guilt appeal) print imagery on donation behaviour to an animal welfare organisation. A quasiexperimental design was used to test the appeals, using a convenience sample of 282 university students, with each experimental group being exposed to only one type of appeal. The results indicated that negative imagery which evoked guilt was more effective than positive imagery which evoked warmth, on intention to donate money and time to the animal welfare organisation.


Who's Saying What About Food Advertising To Children?, Sandra C. Jones, Belinda Fabrianesi 2010 University of Wollongong

Who's Saying What About Food Advertising To Children?, Sandra C. Jones, Belinda Fabrianesi

Sandra Jones

Both Australian and worldwide authorities differ on how the issue of childhood obesity should be tackled. Some call for a junk food tax and restrictions on fast food advertising while others supported initiatives to encourage people to walk and cycle more. This paper examines the Australian media dialogue concerned with food advertising and children presented in the fIrst six months of 2005; identifying the key spokespeople for each side of the debate and the main platforms of their arguments; and making recommendations for social marketing practice.


Content Analysis Of Disease Awareness Advertisements In Popular Australian Women's Magazines, Danika V. Hall, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson 2010 University of Wollongong

Content Analysis Of Disease Awareness Advertisements In Popular Australian Women's Magazines, Danika V. Hall, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson

Sandra Jones

Objective: To examine the nature of disease awareness advertising (DAA). Design: Therapeutic advertisements in six popular Australian women’s magazines were monitored between April 2006 and March 2007. A subset of advertisements was included in the study based on criteria derived from a definition of DAA. Unique advertisements were analysed by four independent coders. Main outcome measures: Types of advertisements and their sponsors, the types of disease information present, and the persuasive techniques utilised. Results: Of 711 advertisements identified, 60 met the inclusion criteria for DAA, and 30 of these were unique. Over one-third of the advertisements were classified as ...


'Most Men Drink... Especially Like When They Play Sports' - Alcohol Advertising During Sporting Broadcasts And The Potential Impact On Child Audiences, Sandra C. Jones, Lyn Phillipson, Lance R. Barrie 2010 University of Wollongong

'Most Men Drink... Especially Like When They Play Sports' - Alcohol Advertising During Sporting Broadcasts And The Potential Impact On Child Audiences, Sandra C. Jones, Lyn Phillipson, Lance R. Barrie

Sandra Jones

Alcohol advertising during sporting broadcasts, as well as the sponsorship of sporting events by the alcohol industry, is common practice in Australia, as in many other countries. The strength of the association between alcohol and sports prompts consideration of the potential for children who watch televised sport to be exposed to a considerable amount of alcohol advertising, and to learn to associate alcohol with sport and sporting success. This paper reviews the current alcohol advertising regulations in Australia, particularly in reference to the protection of children. It then details a pair of studies designed to examine the extent and nature ...


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