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Nitrogen Fertilization Of Corn Grown With A Cover Crop, John E. Sawyer, Jose L. Pantoja, Daniel W. Barker 2010 Iowa State University

Nitrogen Fertilization Of Corn Grown With A Cover Crop, John E. Sawyer, Jose L. Pantoja, Daniel W. Barker

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Objectives of this project were to study corn nitrogen (N) fertilization requirement and corn-soybean yield response when grown in a cover crop system. Multiple rates of N fertilizer are applied, with measurement of corn yield response to applied N and soybean yield with and without a fall planted winter rye cover crop. The study is being conducted at several research farms, with the intent for study across multiple years to allow comparison of with and without a cover crop system across varying soil and climatic conditions.


Long-Term Tillage And Crop Rotation Effects On Yield And Soil Carbon, Mahdi Al-Kaisi 2010 Iowa State University

Long-Term Tillage And Crop Rotation Effects On Yield And Soil Carbon, Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Tillage system and crop rotation have a major long-term effect on soil productivity and soil quality components such as soil carbon and other soil physical, biological, and chemical properties. In addition, both tillage and crop rotation affects weed and soil disease control. There is a need for well-defined, long-term tillage and crop rotation studies across the different soils and climate conditions in the state. The objective of this study is to evaluate the long-term effects of different tillage systems and crop rotations on soil productivity.


Southeast Research Farm Summary, Kevin Van Dee 2010 Iowa State University

Southeast Research Farm Summary, Kevin Van Dee

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Includes:

Farm and Weather Summary


Seasonal And Rotational Influences On Corn Nitrogen Requirements, John E. Sawyer, Daniel W. Barker 2010 Iowa State University

Seasonal And Rotational Influences On Corn Nitrogen Requirements, John E. Sawyer, Daniel W. Barker

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

This project was designed to study the N fertilization needs in continuous corn (CC) and corn rotated with soybean (SC) as influenced by location and climate. Multiple rates of fertilizer N were spring applied, with the intent to measure yield response to N within each rotation on a yearly basis for multiple years at multiple sites across Iowa. This will allow the determination of N requirements for each rotation, differences that exist between the two rotations, responses to applied N across different soils and climatic conditions, and evaluation of tools used to adjust N application.


Regional Corn Planting Date Recommendations For Iowa, Lori Abendroth, Stephanie Marlay, Anthony J.W. Myers, Roger W. Elmore, Robert C. Foster 2010 Iowa State University

Regional Corn Planting Date Recommendations For Iowa, Lori Abendroth, Stephanie Marlay, Anthony J.W. Myers, Roger W. Elmore, Robert C. Foster

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Corn is planted earlier every year and thisis one important component in maximizing grain yield. In 2009, 47% of the statewide corn crop was planted by approximately April 26. This was four days earlier than the previous 5-year average (USDA NASS, 2009). Earlier planting dates are attributed to several causes: larger acreage per producer, less spring tillage, advancements in hybrids, increased tile drainage, and improved seed treatments. The start of corn planting is generally related to the date when the soil temperature reaches 50°F (10°C) or greater.


2009 Home Demonstration Gardens, Paul A. Domoto, Gail R. Nonnecke, Joseph M. Hannan, Dennis N. Portz, Leah B. Riesselman, Bernard J. Havlovic, Nicholas P. Howell, Kenneth T. Pecinovsky, Kevin Van Dee 2010 Iowa State University

2009 Home Demonstration Gardens, Paul A. Domoto, Gail R. Nonnecke, Joseph M. Hannan, Dennis N. Portz, Leah B. Riesselman, Bernard J. Havlovic, Nicholas P. Howell, Kenneth T. Pecinovsky, Kevin Van Dee

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

To assess the regional adaptation of wine grape cultivars in Iowa, a trial was established in 2003 through an Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS) specialty crops grant awarded to the Iowa Wine Growers Association (IWGA). The trial was designed to evaluate up to 20 cultivars or advanced selections at four Iowa State University (ISU) farms representing different geographic, climatic, and soil conditions: Horticulture Research Station (HRS), Ames; the Armstrong Research Farm (ARF), Lewis; the Southeast Research Farm (SERF), Crawfordsville; and the Northeast Research Farm (NERF), Nashua. The SERF and NERF plantings also included the 15 cultivars being ...


Update On Soybean Rust In Iowa, Daren S. Mueller 2010 Iowa State University

Update On Soybean Rust In Iowa, Daren S. Mueller

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Similar to the past several years, soybean rust was not a threat for Iowa soybean growers. This year did have a couple of interesting developments, neither affecting Iowa soybeans. First, soybean rust was found in nearly 575 counties, including most (or all) of the counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. Soybean rust was found in 16 states; the furthest north was in Illinois. This is the most counties with rust to date. As a comparison, soybean rust was found in 392 counties in 2008.


Tile Spacing Results, Gregory L. Brenneman 2010 Iowa State University

Tile Spacing Results, Gregory L. Brenneman

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

In 1999, a 45-acre tile spacing project was installed adjacent to the Southeast Research Farm. This was done through donations by local drainage contractors, tile companies, and with assistance from the staff at the Southeast Research Farm. The goal was to compare recommended tile spacing (75 ft) with closer tile spacings.


Soybean Plant Density Effect On Oil Composition In Low-Linolenic Soybean Cultivars, Palle Pedersen, Jason De Bruin, Jeff Butler 2010 Iowa State University

Soybean Plant Density Effect On Oil Composition In Low-Linolenic Soybean Cultivars, Palle Pedersen, Jason De Bruin, Jeff Butler

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Increased demand for soybean with modified oil composition has led to the development of new soybean cultivars with reduced levels of linolenic fatty acids. Plant density effects on soybean oil and protein content have been documented. However, little information is available for producers regarding management for growing low-linolenic soybean. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of plant density on linolenic acid of soybean bred to have reduced linolenic acid content (≤ 3%, low-linolenic) and of traditional soybean cultivars (≈ 7%, high-linolenic).


Sugar Beet Demonstration Plantings, Vincent Lawson 2010 Iowa State University

Sugar Beet Demonstration Plantings, Vincent Lawson

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

This project investigated field production of a potential biofuel crop–sugar beet. Objectives included becoming familiar with cultural methods for growing sugar beet and determining expected yield levels for southeast Iowa. To accomplish this, half-acre trial plots were planted at the Muscatine Island Research Farm (MIRF), Fruitland and at the Southeast Research Farm (SERF), Crawfordsville, in 2008 and 2009. The two sites provided different soil types and growing environments to investigate the crop. Results from both years and locations demonstrate that sugar beets can be grown in southeast Iowa, and with good management and weather conditions, yields should equal or ...


Increasing Native Plant Species Richness Can Increase Ecosystem Multifunctionality Under Intense Livestock Grazing, Forest I. Isbell, Brian J. Wilsey 2010 Iowa State University

Increasing Native Plant Species Richness Can Increase Ecosystem Multifunctionality Under Intense Livestock Grazing, Forest I. Isbell, Brian J. Wilsey

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Species rich native grasslands are frequently converted to species poor exotic pastures; however, the consequences of these land use changes for ecosystem functioning remain unclear. Specifically, it is unclear whether: 1) intense livestock grazing will have similar effects in native and exotic ecosystems, and 2) pasture productivity can be increased by increasing species richness, by changing from native to exotic species, or simply by identifying the most productive species.


Corn Residue Removal Effects On Grain Yield And Soil Quality, Mark A. Licht 2010 Iowa State University

Corn Residue Removal Effects On Grain Yield And Soil Quality, Mark A. Licht

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

In recent years there has been a greater focus on removing corn residue from fields following harvest. The two main reasons are for use as a low cost feedstuff for cattle production and for future use in cellulosic ethanol production. This leads to the question “What effects will there be from removing corn residue following harvest?” This trial was set up to address potential soil quality concerns as well as look at impacts on grain yield.


Corn Plant Populations, 2007 Through 2009, Mark A. Licht 2010 Iowa State University

Corn Plant Populations, 2007 Through 2009, Mark A. Licht

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Corn hybrid genetics change yearly to increase productivity. The newer hybrids appear to possess plant characteristics that allow for higher plant populations. Over the past several years, several field trials across the state have found support for higher plant populations in corn. This trial was designed to collect information to aid in local recommendations. Additionally, this data will be combined into a larger data set of similar trials for statewide recommendations.


Western Research Farm Summary, Wayne B. Roush 2010 Iowa State University

Western Research Farm Summary, Wayne B. Roush

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Includes:

Farm Summary


Weather And Growing Season Summary, Mark A. Licht 2010 Iowa State University

Weather And Growing Season Summary, Mark A. Licht

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

The 2009 growing season resulted in mean monthly temperatures that varied from -8o F to +7o F from the 30-year average (Table 1). This year there were a total of four days above 90o F, down from 10 days in 2007 and up from 2 in 2008. Overall, 2009 was a cooler year than normal. In western Iowa, this growing season will be remembered for the combination of cooler and wetter weather conditions during the growing season.


Update On Soybean Rust In Iowa, Daren S. Mueller 2010 Iowa State University

Update On Soybean Rust In Iowa, Daren S. Mueller

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Similar to the past several years, soybean rust was not a threat for Iowa soybean growers. This year did have a couple of interesting developments, neither affecting Iowa soybeans. First, soybean rust was found in nearly 575 counties, including most (or all) of the counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. Soybean rust was found in 16 states; the furthest north was in Illinois. This is the most counties with rust to date. As a comparison, soybean rust was found in 392 counties in 2008.


Soybean Planting Dates And Populations, Mark A. Licht 2010 Iowa State University

Soybean Planting Dates And Populations, Mark A. Licht

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Soybean genetics are changing yearly with improved yield and/or resistance capabilities. Additionally, small plot research from Iowa State University indicates a planting recommendation of April 20 or as soon as soil and weather conditions are suitable at populations of 125,000 to 140,000 seeds/acre. This trial was designed to demonstrate this recommendation on a local site with local conditions.


Insects And Disease Update, Mark A. Licht, Wayne B. Roush 2010 Iowa State University

Insects And Disease Update, Mark A. Licht, Wayne B. Roush

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Black cutworms are an occasional pest of seedling corn that can cause major damage. A pheromone trap was placed at the research farm in 2009. The peak flight of six moths occurred on May 6 (Figure 1). The moth flights are used to anticipate when cutting from black cutworms would begin and therefore predict when scouting should begin. Based on this monitoring data and data from other locations in west central Iowa, the scouting date was May 24. This scouting date is four days later than 2008.


Effects Of Stocking Rate, Botanical Composition, And Stream Bank Erosion On The Physical Characteristics Of The Streamside Zones Of Pastures (Three-Year Progress Report), Douglas Allen Bear, James R. Russell, Daniel G. Morrical, Mustafa Tufekcioglu, Thomas M. Isenhart, John L. Kovar 2010 Iowa State University

Effects Of Stocking Rate, Botanical Composition, And Stream Bank Erosion On The Physical Characteristics Of The Streamside Zones Of Pastures (Three-Year Progress Report), Douglas Allen Bear, James R. Russell, Daniel G. Morrical, Mustafa Tufekcioglu, Thomas M. Isenhart, John L. Kovar

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

Grazing management practices that allow cattle to congregate near pasture streams may result in the loss of vegetative cover and promote accumulation of manure near the streams, increasing the risk of nonpoint source pollution of the stream


Supplemental Feeding Of Mixed Co-Products To Grazing Heifers, Daniel D. Loy, Ashley Thompson, Daryl R. Strohbehn, Joe Sellers, Kevin Maher, Dennis R. Maxwell, Sam Ruble 2010 Iowa State University

Supplemental Feeding Of Mixed Co-Products To Grazing Heifers, Daniel D. Loy, Ashley Thompson, Daryl R. Strohbehn, Joe Sellers, Kevin Maher, Dennis R. Maxwell, Sam Ruble

Iowa State Research Farm Progress Reports

The growth of the ethanol industry in the Midwest has greatly increased in the last 5 years. This increase has affected the cattle industry in many ways. The increased demand for corn by this industry has driven prices to new highs over the last 3 years. This has affected feed costs for the cattle industry. On the other hand, the growth of the ethanol industry has increased the amount of byproducts that are produced.


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