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Description Of A New Species Of Paradamoetas (Araneae: Salticidae), With A Revised Key To The Genus, Bruce Cutler 2017 Valparaiso University

Description Of A New Species Of Paradamoetas (Araneae: Salticidae), With A Revised Key To The Genus, Bruce Cutler

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Paradamoetas changuinola new species, is described. The range of this antlike genus of jumping spiders is extended south to Panama. A revised key to the four specics currently recognized is presented.


New Records For Ectoparasites Of Michigan Bats, S. B. Dood, A. Kurta 2017 Bowling Green State University

New Records For Ectoparasites Of Michigan Bats, S. B. Dood, A. Kurta

The Great Lakes Entomologist

During 1978, 1979, and 1981 ectoparasites of bats were collected in 16 counties of the Upper and Lower peninsulas in connection with an extensive study of Michigan bat populations (Kurta 1980, 1982). The two insect and five acarine species recovered include four new records for Michigan and two new host records for the United States. All are listed with comments on past records of Michigan bat ectoparasites.


Diurnal And Seasonal Activity Of Female Mutillids On A Michigan Sand Flat (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae), David A. Evans 2017 Kalamazoo College

Diurnal And Seasonal Activity Of Female Mutillids On A Michigan Sand Flat (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae), David A. Evans

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Diurnal activity of mutillid females of a southwestern Michigan sand area was characterized in relation to sand surface temperature conditions. Seasonal abundance patterns weredetermined for four Dasymutilla species.


Susceptibility Of White Spruce Seed Sources To Yellowheaded Spruce Sawfly, Pikonema Alaskensis,(Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae), Michael D. Connor, Mark W. Houseweart, Herbert M. Kulman 2017 USDA Forest Service

Susceptibility Of White Spruce Seed Sources To Yellowheaded Spruce Sawfly, Pikonema Alaskensis,(Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae), Michael D. Connor, Mark W. Houseweart, Herbert M. Kulman

The Great Lakes Entomologist

A field caging technique was used to test the susceptibility of 25 white spruce, Picea glauca (Moench) Voss, seed sources to attack by Pikonema alaskensis (Rohwer). No sig- nificant differences were found in the number of eggs laid, number of dessicated eggs, or number of egg slits. Percent oviposition differed significantly within a tree, the south side having more eggs. Bud size differed significantly within trees and between trees but not between seed sources. The number of sawfly eggs laid on a bud could not be related to bud size. There was no significant difference in susceptibility of the seed ...


Notes On Shifting Distribution Patterns And Survival Of Immature Danaus Plexippus (Lepidoptera: Danaidae) On The Food Plant Asclepias Syriaca, Susan Sullivan Borkin 2017 Milwaukee Public Museum

Notes On Shifting Distribution Patterns And Survival Of Immature Danaus Plexippus (Lepidoptera: Danaidae) On The Food Plant Asclepias Syriaca, Susan Sullivan Borkin

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Abundance and distribution of immature stages of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, on the food plant Asclepias syriaca were examined at a site in southeastern Wisconsin over one growing season. Estimated mortality for eggs and larvae was substantial (88%). Dispersal of larvae between individual food plants, along with egg and larval mortality factors, may result in low population density. Although the mechanism triggering larval dispersal is unknown, several alternative hypotheses are proposed for further examination.


Gypsy Moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae): History Of Eradication Efforts In Michigan, 1954-1981, Murray Hanna 2017 Michigan Department of Agriculture

Gypsy Moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae): History Of Eradication Efforts In Michigan, 1954-1981, Murray Hanna

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, was first discovered in Michigan in 1954, Aerial spraying operations were conducted to eradicate gypsy moth infestations with synthetic insecticides (DDT, carbaryl, and diflubenzuron),


Biological Characteristics That Make The Lesser Peachtree Borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) A Pest On Peach Trees, R. H. Meyer 2017 Illinois Natural History Survey

Biological Characteristics That Make The Lesser Peachtree Borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) A Pest On Peach Trees, R. H. Meyer

The Great Lakes Entomologist

The lesser peachtree borer, Synanthedon pictipes, is a native insect with well distributed hosts near peach orchards, which has high mobility between sylvatic and domestic hosts. It is able to take advantage of the susceptibility of the peach tree to periodic freeze injury and disease cankers. The moth stage is present through most of the growing season and effectively conceals the eggs singly at the most favorable sites for larval success.


Adult Female Spruce Bedworm, Choristoneura Fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Dry Weight In Relationship To Pupal Fresh Weight And Case Diameter, W. J. Mattson, C. N. Koller, S. S. Slocum 2017 USDA Forest Service

Adult Female Spruce Bedworm, Choristoneura Fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Dry Weight In Relationship To Pupal Fresh Weight And Case Diameter, W. J. Mattson, C. N. Koller, S. S. Slocum

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

The weights of adult insects are often measured in production and population studies in order to estimate such variables as growth rates, food conversion efficiencies, fecundity, and others. For the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens), both pupal fresh weights and pupal case diameters have been measured as indicators of adult fecundity and adult dry weights (Miller 1957). However, there are no reports explicitly showing the relationship between these metric pupal variables and adult dry weights. This is the goal of this note.


Annotated Bibliography Of The Ambrosia Beetle Xylosandrus Germanus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), B. C. Weber, J. E. McPherson 2017 Southern Illinois University

Annotated Bibliography Of The Ambrosia Beetle Xylosandrus Germanus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), B. C. Weber, J. E. Mcpherson

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) (= Xyleborus germanus) is an ambrosia beetle that is found in Japan, Korea, the KurU Islands, Vietnam, China, Taiwan, central Europe, and the Cnited States (Nobuchi 1981). It attacks apparently healthy plants and those that are dying or recently dead (Weber 1982). Kaneko (1967) reported X. germanus to be a serious pest on tea (Thea sp.) plants in Japan, and Heidenreich (1%0) reported it on oak (Quercus sp.) trees in Gennany. This beetle seems to be increasing in economic importance on black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) and other hardwood species in the U.S. (Weber 1982).


The Distribution Of Xylosandrus Germanus In America North Of Mexico (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), B. C. Weber, J. E. McPherson 2017 Southern Illinois University

The Distribution Of Xylosandrus Germanus In America North Of Mexico (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), B. C. Weber, J. E. Mcpherson

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Xylosandrus gemzanus (Blandford) (= Xyleborlus germanus), a sexually dimorphic beetle. was first described in 1894 from specimens collected in Japan; it is now also known from Korea. the Kuril Islands, Vietnam, China, Taiwan, central Europe, and the U.S. ("Sobuchi 1981).


Projected Red Pine Yields From Aldrin-Treated And Untreated Stands Damaged By White Grub (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) And Other Agents At Stand Age Ten Years, Richard F. Fowler, Louis F. Wilson, Allen L. Lundgren 2017 USDA Forest Service

Projected Red Pine Yields From Aldrin-Treated And Untreated Stands Damaged By White Grub (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) And Other Agents At Stand Age Ten Years, Richard F. Fowler, Louis F. Wilson, Allen L. Lundgren

The Great Lakes Entomologist

White grubs affect pine plantations by killing some trees and by reducing vigor and growth of others. Light to moderate mortality only slightly affects timber yields and financial re- turns if the level of trees remains at the number required for full utilization of the site. Reduced height growth, however, lowers apparent site quality and substantially affects yields and financial returns. The 100 year projections suggest that greater product volumes, financial returns. and higher interest rates on the investment will be gained by grub control before tree growth is reduced.


The Female Of Graphoderus Manitobensis With Notes On Identification Of Female Graphoderus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), Byrn H. Tracy, William L. Hilsenhoff 2017 University of Wisconsin

The Female Of Graphoderus Manitobensis With Notes On Identification Of Female Graphoderus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), Byrn H. Tracy, William L. Hilsenhoff

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Ten male and II female Graphoderus manitobensis were collected in April and May, 1980 and 1981 from a pond 16 kIn west of Madison, WI. Females can be distinguished from female G. fascicollis (Harris) by their much narrower metastemal wings and more pronounced conugated sculpturing on the pronotum. The SCUlpturing and markings on the pronorum. width of the metastemal wings, and projections at the base of the ovipositer are used to identify females of G. manitobensis and three closely related species.


Effects Of Various Split Developmental Photophases And Constant Light During 24 Hour Period On Adult Morphology In Euschistus Tristigmus Tristigmus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), J. E. McPherson, S. M. Paskewitz 2017 Southern Illinois University

Effects Of Various Split Developmental Photophases And Constant Light During 24 Hour Period On Adult Morphology In Euschistus Tristigmus Tristigmus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), J. E. Mcpherson, S. M. Paskewitz

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Rearing immatures of Euschistus tristigmus tristigmus in a range of split photophases during each 24 h period and in constant light showed that the adult dimorphic response in shoulder shape and number of midventral spots could be produced; individuals reared in photoperiods in which each scotopnase was at least 2 h in length developed into the tristigmus (short-day) form.


The Distribution Of Natural Enemies Of The Corn Leaf Aphid (Homoptera: Aphdidae) On Field Corn, S. W. Wagner, W. G. Ruesink 2017 Michigan State University

The Distribution Of Natural Enemies Of The Corn Leaf Aphid (Homoptera: Aphdidae) On Field Corn, S. W. Wagner, W. G. Ruesink

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

The corn leaf aphid (CLA), Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch), is found on field corn in the midwest Cnited States each year. Except for infrequent and scattered outbreaks, CLA populations remain at low levels. Injury to corn occurs during tasseling (Snelling et aL 1941) and is caused by CLAs which are the progeny of colonizers that arrived 2-3 weeks earlier when the corn was in the whorl stage (Bryson 1934, Falter 1963).


The Distribution And Spread Of (Homoptera: Aphididae) In The North-Central States With Notes On Its Hosts, Biology, And Origin, David Voegtlin 2017 Illinois Natural History Survey

The Distribution And Spread Of (Homoptera: Aphididae) In The North-Central States With Notes On Its Hosts, Biology, And Origin, David Voegtlin

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

Hyadaphis tataricae (Aizenberg). an aphid known from eastern Europe, is rapidly becoming a pest on ornamental honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.) throughout the north-central states.

The source of the infestation is not known but it could have been introduced from eastern Canada where it has been present since 1976 (Boisvert et aI. 1981), or by separate introduction from eastern Europe. The first observations in the United States were made in the north-eastern corner of Illinois (Lake County) in 1979 (Voegtlin 1981). Observations of damage levels in that area support the hypothesis that its introduction to the north-central states originated there .


Triepeolus Mesillae (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) In Illinois: A Cleptoparasitic Bee New To The Eastern United States, John K. Bouseman 2017 Illinois Natural History Survey

Triepeolus Mesillae (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) In Illinois: A Cleptoparasitic Bee New To The Eastern United States, John K. Bouseman

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

Cockerell (Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist., Ser. 7, 13:33-42,1904) named Triepeolus mesillae on the basis of a series of specimens which he collected at Mesilla, New Mexico. A second locality for the species was added by Rozen (Amer. Mus. Novitates 2244, 1966) when he described the larva of T. mesillae from cells of Nomia (Epinomia) triangulifera Vacha! excavated by E. A.


Predation On The Pupae Of Saturniidae (Lepidoptera) By Gray Squirrels In Wisconsin, Allen M. Young 2017 Milwaukee Public Museum

Predation On The Pupae Of Saturniidae (Lepidoptera) By Gray Squirrels In Wisconsin, Allen M. Young

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

Owing to their large body size, the larvae and pupae ofgiant silkworm moths (Saturniidae) are ideal food for many animals. Winter predation on the pupae of Hyalophora cecropia (L.) in Illinois by birds (Waldbauer and Sternburg, Ecology 48:312-315, 1967) is a well known example.


Butterflies Of The Rocky Mountain States. Edited By Clifford D. Ferris And F. Martin Brown. University Of Oklahoma Press, Norman. 464 Pages, Incl. 4 Color Plates. 1981. $35.00 (Cloth), $15.95 (Paper)., M. C. Nielsen 2017 Valparaiso University

Butterflies Of The Rocky Mountain States. Edited By Clifford D. Ferris And F. Martin Brown. University Of Oklahoma Press, Norman. 464 Pages, Incl. 4 Color Plates. 1981. $35.00 (Cloth), $15.95 (Paper)., M. C. Nielsen

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

The long awaited guide to the butterflies of the Rocky Mountains will be received with great delight by many lepidopterists who collect butterflies in this rugged and beautiful region.


Michigan Trees. Burton V. Barnes And Warren H. Wagner, Jr. The University Of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor. 384 Pages, 120 Figures. 1981. $10.95 (Cloth), $5.95 (Paper)., D. C. L. Gosling 2017 Valparaiso University

Michigan Trees. Burton V. Barnes And Warren H. Wagner, Jr. The University Of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor. 384 Pages, 120 Figures. 1981. $10.95 (Cloth), $5.95 (Paper)., D. C. L. Gosling

The Great Lakes Entomologist

(excerpt)

Nearly all entomologists studying terrestrial insects in the Lake States region find it necessary to recognize and attempt to understand the woody plant communities in which they live. My own great interest in trees was an obvious corollary of my work with forest insects and began with a copy of Michigan Trees by Charles Otis.


A Directory Of Policies On Arthropod Collecting On Public Lands, Gary A. Dunn 2017 Michigan State University

A Directory Of Policies On Arthropod Collecting On Public Lands, Gary A. Dunn

The Great Lakes Entomologist

There are many local, state, and federal agencies with responsibilities for managing public lands. The availability of these lands for entomological research and collecting is determined in great part by the specific governmental charges for the management and use of the area; for example: preservation, recreation, or multiple-use resource management.


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