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Community Perceptions Of Grivet Monkey Crop Depredation In The Ethiopian Highlands: Implications For Primate Conservation, Aschalew Alelign, Meheretu Yonas 2017 Department of Animal, Rangeland and Wildlife Science, Mekelle University, P.O. Box 231, Mekelle, Ethiopia

Community Perceptions Of Grivet Monkey Crop Depredation In The Ethiopian Highlands: Implications For Primate Conservation, Aschalew Alelign, Meheretu Yonas

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Human–primate conflicts in Africa have been increasing due to increased human population growth and the resulting competition for forest resources. The Ethiopian Highlands in northern Ethiopia, home to the grivet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops), once consisted of large forested areas. This region has been severely denuded and now exhibits only small forest patches remaining at sites with special cultural significance in the immediate vicinity of churches. These forest patches, surrounded by agricultural crops, provide refugia habitat for the grivet monkey. We randomly surveyed 50 villagers living near the Batiero Church Forest, a 45-ha forest patch located in northern Ethiopia, to ...


Using Resident-Based Hazing Programs To Reduce Human-Coyote Conflicts In Urban Environments, Mary Ann Bonnell, Stewart W. Breck 2017 Jefferson County Open Space Department

Using Resident-Based Hazing Programs To Reduce Human-Coyote Conflicts In Urban Environments, Mary Ann Bonnell, Stewart W. Breck

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Abstract The concept of hazing (aversive conditioning) is often promoted as a tool for reducing human-coyote (Canis latrans) conflicts in urban environments. Little scientific evidence exists on the effectiveness of hazing, particularly hazing applied by residents (i.e., community-level hazing). Wildlife professionals question if residents will properly and consistently apply hazing techniques and if hazing impacts coyote behavior over short- and long-term periods. We describe two separate efforts designed to encourage residents to haze coyotes in the Denver Metro Area; a citizen-science program and an open space hazing trial. Both efforts were intended to be management techniques that either could ...


Evaluating Lethal And Nonlethal Management Options For Urban Coyotes, Stewart W. Breck, Sharon A. Poessel, Mary Ann Bonnell 2017 USDA/APHIS/WS National Wildlife Research Center

Evaluating Lethal And Nonlethal Management Options For Urban Coyotes, Stewart W. Breck, Sharon A. Poessel, Mary Ann Bonnell

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Human-coyote conflict in urban environments is a growing issue in cities throughout the United States with the primary problem being the development of problem individuals that are overly bold and aggressive with people and pets. Little research has focused on management options to deal with this conflict. We better define lethal and nonlethal management strategies associated with proactive and reactive management of coyotes with an emphasis on management of problem individuals. We then provide data from research in the Denver Metropolitan Area (DMA) that focused on reactive lethal removal of problem coyotes and reactive nonlethal hazing (i.e., community-level hazing ...


Coyote Attacks On Humans, 1970-2015: Implications For Reducing The Risks, Rex O. Baker, Robert M. Timm 2017 California Polytechnic State University

Coyote Attacks On Humans, 1970-2015: Implications For Reducing The Risks, Rex O. Baker, Robert M. Timm

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Beginning with the emerging pattern of urban and suburban coyotes (Canis latrans) attacking humans in southern California in the late 1970s, we analyzed information from reported attacks to better understand the factors contributing to changes in coyote behavior. We subsequently used updated data collected largely in urban and suburban environments in the United States and Canada during the past 30 years to develop strategies to reduce the risk of attacks. In the 1990s, increased incidents of coyote attacks were reported in states beyond California and in Canadian provinces. We documented 367 attacks on humans by coyotes from 1977 through 2015 ...


The Genetic And Environmental Basis For Chc Biosynthesis In Drosophila, Heather KE Ward 2017 The University of Western Ontario

The Genetic And Environmental Basis For Chc Biosynthesis In Drosophila, Heather Ke Ward

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are produced by insects and primarily used to prevent desiccation. In Drosophila, certain compounds have secondary roles as infochemicals that may act during courtship to influence mate choice. Certain CHCs may stimulate courtship with heterospecifics or act to repel conspecifics. The CHC profile produced by an individual is the result of the interaction between its genetic background and the environment, though the genes that underlie species differences in CHC production and how the environment can modulate the abundance of individual compounds within a species is not well known. Here, candidate gene CG5946 was found to be involved ...


Processing Conservation Indicators With Open Source Tools: Lessons Learned From The Digital Observatory For Protected Areas, Lucy Bastin, Andrea Mandrici, Luca Battistella, Grégoire Dubois 2017 European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Directorate D: Sustainable Resources, Knowledge for Sustainable Development and Food Security, Via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (VA), Italy

Processing Conservation Indicators With Open Source Tools: Lessons Learned From The Digital Observatory For Protected Areas, Lucy Bastin, Andrea Mandrici, Luca Battistella, Grégoire Dubois

Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial (FOSS4G) Conference Proceedings

The European Commission has a commitment to open data and the support of open source software and standards. We present lessons learnt while populating and supporting the web and map services that underly the Joint Research Centre's Digital Observatory for Protected Areas. Challenges include: large datasets with highly complex geometries; topological inconsistencies, compounded by reprojection for equal-area calculations; multiple different representations of the same geographical entities, for example coastlines; licensing requirement to continuously update indicators to respond to monthly changes in the authoritative data. In order to compute and publish an array of indicators, we used a range of ...


The Second Record Of A Relict Akrav Israchanani Levy, 2007 (Scorpiones: Akravidae) From Levana Cave, Israel, Victor Fet, Michael E. Soleglad, Sergei L. Zonstein, Israel Naaman, Shlomi Lubaton, Boaz Langford, Amos Frumkin 2017 Marshall University

The Second Record Of A Relict Akrav Israchanani Levy, 2007 (Scorpiones: Akravidae) From Levana Cave, Israel, Victor Fet, Michael E. Soleglad, Sergei L. Zonstein, Israel Naaman, Shlomi Lubaton, Boaz Langford, Amos Frumkin

Victor Fet

We report the remnants of five new scorpion specimens discovered dead in Levana Cave in Israel in December 2015. We confirm that they belong to the relict scorpion Akrav israchanani Levy, 2007 (Akravidae), famously described from the neighboring Ayyalon Cave, also from dead specimens. The details of morphology of the new specimens are given; they match completely the characters of A. israchanani redescribed by Fet, Soleglad & Zonstein (2011). This second record indicates a wider distribution of this unique cave scorpion, which, however, is extinct in both caves. There is still no evidence that live populations of this species exist.


Physiological Ecology Of Four Endemic Alabama Species And The Exotic Asiatic Weatherfish, Misgurnus Anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842), Lindsay M. White, Mark E. Meade, Benjamin A. Staton 2017 Auburn University

Physiological Ecology Of Four Endemic Alabama Species And The Exotic Asiatic Weatherfish, Misgurnus Anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842), Lindsay M. White, Mark E. Meade, Benjamin A. Staton

Southeastern Fishes Council Proceedings

The occurrence of Asiatic Weatherfish, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, in Alabama, a state known for its rich biodiversity, has generated concern among conservation managers. The current study used respirometry techniques to investigate the effects of increasing temperature on four native southeastern fishes (one cyprinid, two percids, and one elassomid) and the non-native M. anguillicaudatus. A minimum of five individuals of each species were used, and three experimental temperatures were chosen to represent spring and summer averages of northeast Alabama streams (15, 20, and 25°C). Overall, mean standard metabolic rates (SMRs) for M. anguillicaudatus were low (97.01, 127.75, and 158 ...


The Inconvenient Truth About Thinking Chickens, Lori Marino 2017 Animal Studies Repository

The Inconvenient Truth About Thinking Chickens, Lori Marino

Animal Sentience: An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling

Original Abstract: Domestic chickens are members of an order, Aves, which has been the focus of a revolution in our understanding of neuroanatomical, cognitive, and social complexity. Some birds are now known to be on a par with many mammals in their intelligence, emotional sophistication, and social interaction. Yet views of chickens have largely remained unrevised in light of this new evidence. In this paper, I examine the data on cognition, emotions, personality, and sociality in chickens, exploring such areas as self-awareness, cognitive bias, social learning and self-control, and comparing their abilities with other birds and other vertebrates, particularly mammals ...


First Report Of A Population Of Western Blacknose Dace (Rhinichthys Obtusus) In The Brushy Creek System Of The Black Warrior River Drainage, Alabama, Eric Bauer, Malorie M. Hayes 2017 Auburn University Main Campus

First Report Of A Population Of Western Blacknose Dace (Rhinichthys Obtusus) In The Brushy Creek System Of The Black Warrior River Drainage, Alabama, Eric Bauer, Malorie M. Hayes

Southeastern Fishes Council Proceedings

Alabama is home to the southernmost populations of Rhinichthys obtusus, the Western Blacknose Dace. Within Alabama, R. obtusus is found in the Tennessee, Coosa, and Black Warrior River basins, but its presence in the Black Warrior River drainage has been limited. Until now, R. obtusus in the Black Warrior drainage has only been reported as collections of 1 to 4 specimens at a time in the Sipsey Fork drainage. Herein, we report two novel occurrences of R. obtusus in the headwaters of the Brushy Creek system in the Black Warrior River drainage including a singleton and a large population. The ...


Autumn Migration Of Myotis Septentrionalis In Nebraska: Documentation Of Fall Activity, Migratory Timing, And Distance Using Radio-Telemetry, Jeremy A. White, Patricia W. Freeman, Hans W. Otto, Brett R. Andersen, Jonathan Hootman, Cliff A. Lemen 2017 University of Nebraska at Omaha

Autumn Migration Of Myotis Septentrionalis In Nebraska: Documentation Of Fall Activity, Migratory Timing, And Distance Using Radio-Telemetry, Jeremy A. White, Patricia W. Freeman, Hans W. Otto, Brett R. Andersen, Jonathan Hootman, Cliff A. Lemen

Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Sciences and Affiliated Societies

Abstract.—Few studies have investigated autumn migration of the northern long-eared myotis (Myotis septentrionalis). We conducted a two-year radio-tracking study of M. septentrionalis in southeastern Nebraska to document migration dates, activity in autumn, and movements to wintering sites. We found evidence that M. septentrionalis are migrating as late as October and early November. Prior to migration, cold nights curtail flying times of M. septentrionalis. Two bats in this study did not emerge from their roost trees for seven consecutive nights during a period of colder weather. We monitored one bat leaving our research area on the night of 20 October ...


Review Of Seagrassnet Monitoring Photographs In Great Bay, New Hampshire, Usa 2007 - 2014, Frederick T. Short 2017 University of New Hampshire, Durham

Review Of Seagrassnet Monitoring Photographs In Great Bay, New Hampshire, Usa 2007 - 2014, Frederick T. Short

PREP Publications

SeagrassNet is a global monitoring program begun in 2001 and designed to scientifically detect and document seagrass habitat change (Short et al. 2006a, 2014). Monitoring of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in the Great Bay Estuary using SeagrassNet was conducted in Portsmouth Harbor between 2001 and 2009 (Short et al 2006b, Rivers and Short 2007), and is ongoing in Great Bay itself, from 2007 (Short 2009) to the present. In this report, July quadrat photos taken along the three Great Bay SeagrassNet transects from 2007 – 2014 are presented and discussed. They provide useful documentation of field percent cover measurements of eelgrass ...


Response Of Anurans To Wetland Restoration On A Midwestern Agricultural Landscape, Paul E. Bartelt, Robert W. Klaver 2017 Waldorf University

Response Of Anurans To Wetland Restoration On A Midwestern Agricultural Landscape, Paul E. Bartelt, Robert W. Klaver

Natural Resource Ecology and Management Publications

Since the early 1990s, >5,000 ha of historic wetlands (and adjacent prairie) have been restored on the row-crop agricultural landscape of Winnebago County, Iowa, USA. From 2008–2011, we surveyed 22 of these sites for probabilities of occupancy and colonization by Boreal Chorus Frogs (BCF; Pseudacris maculata), Northern Leopard Frogs (NLF; Lithobates pipiens), and American Toads (AT; Anaxyrus americanus). We used radio telemetry to measure patterns of movement and habitat use by 22 NLF and 54 AT and deployed biophysical models in available habitats to estimate their physiological costs. The BCF occupied 100% of restored wetlands; NLF and AT ...


Dorr And Fielder 2017 Dcco Too Much Of A Good Thing Fsh.Pdf, Brian S. Dorr, David G. Fielder 2017 USDA National Wildlife Research Center

Dorr And Fielder 2017 Dcco Too Much Of A Good Thing Fsh.Pdf, Brian S. Dorr, David G. Fielder

Brian S Dorr

For centuries, people have viewed double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus negatively, and human persecution coupled with environmental contamination severely reduced numbers of cormorants throughout North America. Shifts in paradigms for management of our natural resources resulted in reductions in environmental contaminants and regulatory protection of cormorants, allowing for an amazing population resurgence of this adaptable fish-eating bird. However, for cormorants, as with some other native wildlife species the populations of which have rebounded due to conservation efforts, there have been cormorant–societal conflicts with respect to commercial and natural resources such as aquaculture and sport fisheries. Increasing resource conflicts caused cormorants ...


Characterizing The Scent And Chemical Composition Of Panthera Leo Marking Fluid Using Solid-Phase Microextraction And Multidimensional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry, Simone B. Soso, Jacek A. Koziel 2017 Iowa State University

Characterizing The Scent And Chemical Composition Of Panthera Leo Marking Fluid Using Solid-Phase Microextraction And Multidimensional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry, Simone B. Soso, Jacek A. Koziel

Simone B. Soso

Lions (Panthera leo) use chemical signaling to indicate health, reproductive status, and territorial ownership. To date, no study has reported on both scent and composition of marking fluid (MF) from P. leo. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop a novel method for simultaneous chemical and scent identification of lion MF in its totality (urine + MF), 2) identify characteristic odorants responsible for the overall scent of MF as perceived by human panelists, and 3) compare the existing library of known odorous compounds characterized as eliciting behaviors in animals in order to understand potential functionality in lion behavior. Solid-phase ...


Desert Pool {If Every Desert Was Once A Sea}, Karen Miranda Abel 2017 York University

Desert Pool {If Every Desert Was Once A Sea}, Karen Miranda Abel

The Goose

Desert Pool {If every desert was once a sea} is a site-specific art project by Canadian artist Karen Miranda Abel completed in 2016 while artist-in-residence at Joya: arte + ecología, an arts-led research centre situated in an alpine desert within a national park in southern Spain. The elemental installation represents an envisioning of the ancient sea that occupied the Sierra de María-Los Vélez Natural Park millions of years before the current desert ecology, a time when its highest mountain peaks may have been islands.


Effects Of A Prescribed Burn On The Adult Butterfly Assemblage Of A Coastal Grassland, J. Nicole DeSha, Joseph Colbert, Kimberly M. Andrews, Scott Coleman, C. Tate Holbrook 2017 College of Coastal Georgia

Effects Of A Prescribed Burn On The Adult Butterfly Assemblage Of A Coastal Grassland, J. Nicole Desha, Joseph Colbert, Kimberly M. Andrews, Scott Coleman, C. Tate Holbrook

Georgia Journal of Science

Coastal grasslands are globally threatened by development and natural succession. In the southeastern United States, these increasingly rare ecosystems are being managed using prescribed fire, but ecological responses to fire management are largely unknown, particularly among nontargeted species. We tested for short-term effects of controlled burning on the abundance and species richness of adult butterflies, which utilize coastal grasslands for nectaring resources and as migratory stopover sites. In February 2015, four plots of coastal grassland on Little St. Simons Island, GA were burned and paired with unburned (control) plots of equal size. Throughout the following summer-fall flight season, we conducted ...


Spatial And Temporal Heterogeneity Of Microbial Life In Artificial Landscapes, Roopkamal Kaur, Aditi Sengupta, Peter A. Troch 2017 University of Southern California

Spatial And Temporal Heterogeneity Of Microbial Life In Artificial Landscapes, Roopkamal Kaur, Aditi Sengupta, Peter A. Troch

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) project at Biosphere 2 consists of three replicated artificial landscapes which are sealed within a climate-controlled glass house. LEO is composed of basaltic soil material with low organic matter, nutrients, and microbes. The landscapes are built to resemble zero-order basins and enables researchers to observe hydrological, biological, and geochemical evolution of landscapes in a controlled environment. This study is focused on capturing microbial community dynamics in LEO soil, pre- and post-controlled rainfall episodes. Soil samples were collected from six different positions and at five depths in each of the three slopes followed by DNA extraction ...


A Synergistic Approach For Evaluating Climate Model Output For Ecological Applications, Rachel D. Cavanagh, Eugene J. Murphy, Thomas J. Bracegirdle, John Turner, Cheryl A. Knowland, Stuart P. Corney, Walker O. Smith Jr., Claire M. Waluda, Nadine M. Johnston, Richard G. J. Bellerby, Eileen E. Hofmann 2017 Old Dominion University

A Synergistic Approach For Evaluating Climate Model Output For Ecological Applications, Rachel D. Cavanagh, Eugene J. Murphy, Thomas J. Bracegirdle, John Turner, Cheryl A. Knowland, Stuart P. Corney, Walker O. Smith Jr., Claire M. Waluda, Nadine M. Johnston, Richard G. J. Bellerby, Eileen E. Hofmann

CCPO Publications

Increasing concern about the impacts of climate change on ecosystems is prompting ecologists and ecosystem managers to seek reliable projections of physical drivers of change. The use of global climate models in ecology is growing, although drawing ecologically meaningful conclusions can be problematic. The expertise required to access and interpret output from climate and earth system models is hampering progress in utilizing them most effectively to determine the wider implications of climate change. To address this issue, we present a joint approach between climate scientists and ecologists that explores key challenges and opportunities for progress. As an exemplar, our focus ...


Walking As Ontological Shifter: Thoughts In The Key Of Life, Bibi (Silvina) Calderaro 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Walking As Ontological Shifter: Thoughts In The Key Of Life, Bibi (Silvina) Calderaro

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

With walking as ontological shifter I pursue an alternative to the dominant modernist episteme that offers either/or onto-epistemologies of opposition and their reifying engagements. I propose this type of walking is an intentional turning towards a set of radical positions that, as integrative aesthetic and therapeutic practice, brings multiplicity and synchronicity to experience and being in an expanded sociality. This practice facilitates the conditions of possibility for recurring points of contact between the interiority perceived as ‘body’ and the exteriority perceived as ‘world.’ While making evident the self’s at once incoherence with it-self, it opens to a space ...


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