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11649 full-text articles. Page 4 of 346.

Clusters Of Alpha Satellite On Human Chromosome 21 Are Dispersed Far Onto The Short Arm And Lack Ancient Layers, William Ziccardi, Chongjian Zhao, Valery Shepelev, Lev Uralsky, Ivan Alexandrov, Tatyana Andreeva, Evgeny Rogaev, Christopher Bun, Emily Miller, Catherine Putonti, Jeffrey Doering 2017 Loyola University Chicago

Clusters Of Alpha Satellite On Human Chromosome 21 Are Dispersed Far Onto The Short Arm And Lack Ancient Layers, William Ziccardi, Chongjian Zhao, Valery Shepelev, Lev Uralsky, Ivan Alexandrov, Tatyana Andreeva, Evgeny Rogaev, Christopher Bun, Emily Miller, Catherine Putonti, Jeffrey Doering

Catherine Putonti

Human alpha satellite (AS) sequence domains that currently function as centromeres are typically flanked by layers of evolutionarily older AS that presumably represent the remnants of earlier primate centromeres. Studies on several human chromosomes reveal that these older AS arrays are arranged in an age gradient, with the oldest arrays farthest from the functional centromere and arrays progressively closer to the centromere being progressively younger. The organization of AS on human chromosome 21 (HC21) has not been well-characterized. We have used newly available HC21 sequence data and an HC21p YAC map to determine the size, organization, and location of the ...


Freshwater Metaviromics And Bacteriophages: A Current Assessment Of The State Of The Art In Relation To Bioinformatic Challenges, Katherine Bruder, Kema Malki, Alexandria Cooper, Emily Sible, Jason W. Shapiro, Siobhan C. Watkins, Catherine Putonti 2017 Loyola University Chicago

Freshwater Metaviromics And Bacteriophages: A Current Assessment Of The State Of The Art In Relation To Bioinformatic Challenges, Katherine Bruder, Kema Malki, Alexandria Cooper, Emily Sible, Jason W. Shapiro, Siobhan C. Watkins, Catherine Putonti

Catherine Putonti

Advances in bioinformatics and sequencing technologies have allowed for the analysis of complex microbial communities at an unprecedented rate. While much focus is often placed on the cellular members of these communities, viruses play a pivotal role, particularly bacteria-infecting viruses (bacteriophages); phages mediate global biogeochemical processes and drive microbial evolution through bacterial grazing and horizontal gene transfer. Despite their importance and ubiquity in nature, very little is known about the diversity and structure of viral communities. Though the need for culture-based methods for viral identification has been somewhat circumvented through metagenomic techniques, the analysis of metaviromic data is marred with ...


A Polyglot Approach To Bioinformatics Data Integration: A Phylogenetic Analysis Of Hiv-1, Steven Reisman, Thomas Hatzopoulos, Konstantin Laufer, George K. Thiruvathukal, Catherine Putonti 2017 Loyola University Chicago

A Polyglot Approach To Bioinformatics Data Integration: A Phylogenetic Analysis Of Hiv-1, Steven Reisman, Thomas Hatzopoulos, Konstantin Laufer, George K. Thiruvathukal, Catherine Putonti

Catherine Putonti

As sequencing technologies continue to drop in price and increase in throughput, new challenges emerge for the management and accessibility of genomic sequence data. We have developed a pipeline for facilitating the storage, retrieval, and subsequent analysis of molecular data, integrating both sequence and metadata. Taking a polyglot approach involving multiple languages, libraries, and persistence mechanisms, sequence data can be aggregated from publicly available and local repositories. Data are exposed in the form of a RESTful web service, formatted for easy querying, and retrieved for downstream analyses. As a proof of concept, we have developed a resource for annotated HIV-1 ...


18s Rdna Dataset Profiling Microeukaryotic Populations Within Chicago Area Nearshore Waters, Daniel Searle, Emily Sible, Alexandria Cooper, Catherine Putonti 2017 The Woodhall School

18s Rdna Dataset Profiling Microeukaryotic Populations Within Chicago Area Nearshore Waters, Daniel Searle, Emily Sible, Alexandria Cooper, Catherine Putonti

Catherine Putonti

Despite their critical role in the aquatic food web and nutrient cycling, microeukaryotes within freshwater environments are under-studied. Herein we present the first high-throughput molecular survey of microeukaryotes within Lake Michigan. Every two weeks from May 13 to August 5, 2014, we collected surface water samples from the nearshore waters of four Chicago area beaches: Gillson Park, Montrose Beach, 57th Street Beach, and Calumet Beach. Four biological replicates were collected for each sampling date and location, resulting in 112 samples. Eighty-nine of these samples were surveyed through targeted sequencing of the V7 and V8 regions of the 18S rDNA gene ...


First Record Of The Ligurian Leafhopper, Eupteryx Decemnotata Rey (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) In Pennsylvania, Claire Ciafre, Lawrence Barringer 2017 Harrisburg, PA 17110 USA

First Record Of The Ligurian Leafhopper, Eupteryx Decemnotata Rey (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) In Pennsylvania, Claire Ciafre, Lawrence Barringer

Insecta Mundi

Eupteryx decemnotata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) is reported from Pennsylvania for the fi rst time, a new state record.


Biological Aspects And Redescription Of The Weevil Revena Plaumanni Bondar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Marcoandre Savaris, Silvana Lampert, Germano H. Rosado-Neto, Fernando Willyan Trevisan Leivas, Paul Roberto Valle da Silva Pereira 2017 Universidade Federal do Paraná

Biological Aspects And Redescription Of The Weevil Revena Plaumanni Bondar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Marcoandre Savaris, Silvana Lampert, Germano H. Rosado-Neto, Fernando Willyan Trevisan Leivas, Paul Roberto Valle Da Silva Pereira

Insecta Mundi

Redescription of adult and observations of the weevil Revena plaumanni Bondar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), preying on seeds of the palm tree Butia eriospatha (Mart. ex Drude) Becc. (Arecaceae), as well as oviposition and larval behavior, pupation site, and adult emergence are reported for the fi rst time in Brazil. Photos of host plant, immature forms (egg, larva and pupa) and adult are given. Illustrations of male and female genitalia are also provided.


Two New Genera And Species Of Tiger Beetles From Baltic Amber (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae), Jürgen Wiesner, Kipling Will, Joachim Schmidt 2017 Wolfsburg, Germany

Two New Genera And Species Of Tiger Beetles From Baltic Amber (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae), Jürgen Wiesner, Kipling Will, Joachim Schmidt

Insecta Mundi

Two fossil tiger beetle species (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Cicindelinae) are described from Eocene Baltic amber using light microscopic and X-ray microscopic techniques. Both species are considered representatives of the subtribe Iresina Rivalier, 1971 due to the shared combination of character states: glabrous head, six labral and four suborbital setae, and glabrous pronotum. Palaeopronyssiformia groehni Wiesner, Will, and Schmidt, new genus, new species, is characterized by a glabrous and furrowed head with six labral setae, large eyes, presence of two supraorbital setae on each side, mandibles with two teeth of the incisor region, and a glabrous and furrowed pronotum. Palaeoiresina cassolai Wiesner ...


Session C-1: Ecosystem Disruption: Using Lab And Real-World Examples To Bring Changes In Earth’S Ecosystems To Life, Crystal Randall, Sarah O'Leary-Driscoll, Sowmya Anjur, Don Dosch 2017 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Session C-1: Ecosystem Disruption: Using Lab And Real-World Examples To Bring Changes In Earth’S Ecosystems To Life, Crystal Randall, Sarah O'Leary-Driscoll, Sowmya Anjur, Don Dosch

Donald Dosch

The magnitude of the changes occurring in Earth’s ecosystems seems difficult to tackle in the classroom and lab. Here we explore ways to demonstrate the changes in the Earth’s water and carbon cycles in the lab and bring them to life in real-world ecosystems in the classroom.


Habitat Eradication And Cropland Intensification May Reduce Parasitoid Diversity And Natural Pest Control Services In Annual Crop Fields, D. K. Letourneau, Sara G. Bothwell Allen, Robert R. Kula, Michael J. Sharkey, John O. Stireman III 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Habitat Eradication And Cropland Intensification May Reduce Parasitoid Diversity And Natural Pest Control Services In Annual Crop Fields, D. K. Letourneau, Sara G. Bothwell Allen, Robert R. Kula, Michael J. Sharkey, John O. Stireman Iii

John Stireman

California’s central coast differs from many agricultural areas in the U.S., which feature large tracts of monoculture production fields and relatively simple landscapes. Known as the nation’s salad bowl, and producing up to 90% of U.S. production of lettuces, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, this region is a mosaic of fresh vegetable fields, coastal meadow, chaparral shrubs, riparian and woodland habitat. We tested for relationships between the percent cover of crops, riparian and other natural landscape vegetation and the species richness of parasitic wasps and flies foraging in crops, such as broccoli, kale and cauliflower, and interpreted ...


Diversity Of Interactions: A Metric For Studies Of Biodiversity, Lee A. Dyer, Thomas R. Walla, Harold F. Greeney, John O. Stireman III, Rebecca F. Hazen 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Diversity Of Interactions: A Metric For Studies Of Biodiversity, Lee A. Dyer, Thomas R. Walla, Harold F. Greeney, John O. Stireman Iii, Rebecca F. Hazen

John Stireman

Multitrophic interactions play key roles in the origin and maintenance of species diversity, and the study of these interactions has contributed to important theoretical advances in ecology and evolutionary biology. Nevertheless, most biodiversity inventories focus on static species lists, and prominent theories of diversity still ignore trophic interactions. The lack of a simple interaction metric that is analogous to species richness is one reason why diversity of interactions is not examined as a response or predictor variable in diversity studies. Using plant-herbivore-enemy trophic chains as an example, we develop a simple metric of diversity in which richness, diversity indices (e ...


Progress Towards A Molecular Phylogeny Of Tachinidae, Year Two, Isaac S. Winkler, John O. Stireman III, John K. Moulton, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Jeremy D. Blaschke 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Progress Towards A Molecular Phylogeny Of Tachinidae, Year Two, Isaac S. Winkler, John O. Stireman Iii, John K. Moulton, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Jeremy D. Blaschke

John Stireman

We reported last year (Stireman et al. 2013) in The Tachinid Times on our collaborative project, funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, to study the phylogeny of Tachinidae on a worldwide scale. Since that report, we have made some significant progress towards our goal of assembling a robust phylogenetic tree for Tachinidae. Notably, Cerretti et al. (in press) completed a phylogenetic study using 135 morphological characters from 180 tachinid genera. Results from this study largely reflect, with some interesting exceptions, what we are finding from preliminary analyses of our molecular data. Although sampling of taxa and genes for ...


Progress Towards A Phylogeny Of World Tachinidae. Year 1, John O. Stireman III, James E. O'Hara, Michael C. Moulton, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Isaac S. Winkler 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Progress Towards A Phylogeny Of World Tachinidae. Year 1, John O. Stireman Iii, James E. O'Hara, Michael C. Moulton, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Isaac S. Winkler

John Stireman

D eveloping a structural phylogenetic framework for the family Tachinidae has been an interest of mine since I first started working on tachinids as a graduate student. It was then that I developed a new phylogenetic perspective with which to view the world, and many of the questions I wanted to ask of tachinids depended on some level of phylogenetic knowledge of them. I was surprised at the time that no one had attempted a broad quantitative phylogenetic analysis of the family, and a publication from my thesis work on the Exoristinae (Stireman 2002) became the first such study that ...


To 'Die Hel' And Back. Expeditions Of The Phylogeny Of World Tachinidae Project. Part I: Western Cape, South Africa, Pierfilippo Cerretti, James E. O'Hara, John O. Stireman III, Isaac S. Winkler, Ashley H. Kirk-Spriggs 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

To 'Die Hel' And Back. Expeditions Of The Phylogeny Of World Tachinidae Project. Part I: Western Cape, South Africa, Pierfilippo Cerretti, James E. O'Hara, John O. Stireman Iii, Isaac S. Winkler, Ashley H. Kirk-Spriggs

John Stireman

The “Phylogeny of World Tachinidae” project kicked off with an operational meeting in June 2012 at the Canadian National Collection of Insects (CNC) in Ottawa. Goals were discussed, work plans prepared, and of course the destinations and timing of major field expeditions were debated. During our three years of National Science Foundation funding we hope to gather fresh material for molecular analysis from all biogeographic regions of the world.


Tachinid Collecting In Temperate South America. Expeditions Of The Phylogeny Of World Tachinide Project. Part Iii. Chile, John O. Stireman III, James E. O'Hara, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Diego J. Inclán 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Tachinid Collecting In Temperate South America. Expeditions Of The Phylogeny Of World Tachinide Project. Part Iii. Chile, John O. Stireman Iii, James E. O'Hara, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Diego J. Inclán

John Stireman

As readers of this newsletter are likely familiar, we and our collaborators have been working for the past several years on a family-wide phylogeny of the Tachinidae of the world (see Stireman et al. 2013, Winkler et al. 2014). We have already published a morphological analysis of tachinid phylogenetics (Cerretti et al. 2014), as well as an initial molecular phylogenetic framework for the family (Winkler et al. 2015). An in-depth molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Phasiinae led by Jeremy Blaschke (originally at University of Tennessee and now at Union University, TN) and Kevin Moulton (U. of Tenn.) is currently being ...


Tachinid Collecting In Southwest New Mexico And Arizona During The 2007 Nads Field Meeting, John O. Stireman III 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Tachinid Collecting In Southwest New Mexico And Arizona During The 2007 Nads Field Meeting, John O. Stireman Iii

John Stireman

The 2007 field meeting of the North American Dipterists Society (NADS) was held August 13–16 in southwestern New Mexico, centered in Silver City (at Western New Mexico University), and the surrounding Gila National Forest. This was the first NADS meeting that I have been able to attend, and I think I can speak for all in saying it was enjoyable, productive, and interesting; an overall success. A more detailed account and evaluation of this meeting is available in the 2007 Fly Times article (O’Hara 2007).


Phylogenetic Reconstruction Of Exoristinae Using Molecular Data: A Bayesian Re-Analysis, John O. Stireman III 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Phylogenetic Reconstruction Of Exoristinae Using Molecular Data: A Bayesian Re-Analysis, John O. Stireman Iii

John Stireman

A few years ago I published the results of a phylogenetic analysis of New World Exoristinae based on molecular data from two genes, 28S rDNA and Elongation Factor 1-alpha (Stireman 2002). In that study I employed parsimony, neighbor joining, and maximum likelihood inference methods to generate phylogenetic reconstructions, and explored a variety of weighting schemes and combinations of the sequence data (i.e. each gene separately and both together). The results of these analyses generally supported recent taxonomic hypotheses (e.g., Herting 1984; Wood 1987; O’Hara and Wood 2004). For example, Tachinidae and Exoristinae were reconstructed as monophyletic in ...


Preliminary Notes On Tachinidae Reared From Lepidoptera In The Ecuadorian Andes, John O. Stireman III 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Preliminary Notes On Tachinidae Reared From Lepidoptera In The Ecuadorian Andes, John O. Stireman Iii

John Stireman

Current estimates of the species richness of Tachinidae among geographical provinces suggest that the Neotropical Region harbors the largest number of species and represents a geographic epicenter of tachinid diversification (O’Hara 2006). The Neotropics boasts an impressive fauna consisting of 2864 described species belonging to 822 genera at the time of the Neotropical catalog (Guimarães 1971), making it almost twice as species rich as any other geographic realm (O’Hara 2006; Stireman et al. 2006). This diversity is most apparent at middle elevations (1000– 2000m) along the mountain chains of tropical Central and South America, where tachinids are an ...


Continuing Progress Towards A Phylogeny Of Tachinidae, John O. Stireman III, James E. O'Hara, John K. Moulton, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Isaac S. Winkler, Jeremy D. Blaschke, Z. L. Burington 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Continuing Progress Towards A Phylogeny Of Tachinidae, John O. Stireman Iii, James E. O'Hara, John K. Moulton, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Isaac S. Winkler, Jeremy D. Blaschke, Z. L. Burington

John Stireman

Readers of this newsletter are likely familiar with our ongoing project to establish a framework phylogeny of world Tachinidae (see articles in The Tachinid Times 26 and 27). This collaborative project, involving myself, Jim O’Hara, Kevin Moulton, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Isaac Winkler and a long list of collaborating tachinidophiles was initiated in 2012 with funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation. Our goal is to produce a robust phylogenetic framework of Tachinidae that can be used to inform tachinid taxonomy, systematics research, and the patterns of tachinid evolution. In previous issues of The Tachinid Times we summarized our progress ...


Chasing Tachinids ‘Down Under’: Expeditions Of The Phylogeny Of World Tachinidae Project, Part Ii Eastern Australia, James E. O'Hara, Pierfilippo Cerretti, John O. Stireman III, Isaac S. Winkler 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

Chasing Tachinids ‘Down Under’: Expeditions Of The Phylogeny Of World Tachinidae Project, Part Ii Eastern Australia, James E. O'Hara, Pierfilippo Cerretti, John O. Stireman Iii, Isaac S. Winkler

John Stireman

Last year we documented in the pages of this newsletter an expedition to the Western Cape of South Africa in search of tachinids for the “Phylogeny of World Tachinidae” project (Cerretti et al. 2013). The project itself was discussed in a separate article (Stireman et al. 2013). In this issue of The Tachinid Times we discuss our expedition to eastern Australia in late 2013. This trip took place so recently that we have yet to fully identify our material and as a result cannot record here all of the taxa we collected. Instead, we will add the taxa to a ...


A New Tachinid Genus And Species Record For North America: Iceliopsis Borgmeieri Guimarães, John O. Stireman III, Jane E. Dell 2017 Wright State University - Main Campus

A New Tachinid Genus And Species Record For North America: Iceliopsis Borgmeieri Guimarães, John O. Stireman Iii, Jane E. Dell

John Stireman

The Iceliini are a small, enigmatic New World tribe of Tachininae consisting of three genera, Icelia RobineauDesvoidy, Iceliopsis Guimarães, and Erviopsis Townsend, and five recognized species (Guimarães 1976). All known species are exclusively Neotropical in distribution with the exception of Icelia triquetra (Olivier), which ranges from Brazil, through Central America, and as far north as New York state (O’Hara & Wood 2004). Members of the tribe are generally medium-sized (ca. 7–12 mm), elongate, yellowish or grayish in color, and resemble Dexiini or Leskiini in general appearance. Species of Iceliini are relatively rarely collected and there is but a single host record (Lepidoptera; see below). Here, we report on the discovery of a specimen of Iceliopsis borgmeieri Guimarães from the U.S. state of Florida, a species never before recorded outside of Brazil.


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