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Evaluating Propagation Method Performance Over Time With Bayesian Updating: An Application To Incubator Testing, SARAH J. CONVERSE, JANE N. CHANDLER, GLENN H. OLSEN, CHARLES C. SHAFER 2010 USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Evaluating Propagation Method Performance Over Time With Bayesian Updating: An Application To Incubator Testing, Sarah J. Converse, Jane N. Chandler, Glenn H. Olsen, Charles C. Shafer

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

In captive-rearing programs, small sample sizes can limit the quality of information on performance of propagation methods. Bayesian updating can be used to increase information on method performance over time. We demonstrate an application to incubator testing at USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. A new type of incubator was purchased for use in the whooping crane (Grus americana) propagation program, which produces birds for release. We tested the new incubator for reliability, using sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) eggs as surrogates. We determined that the new incubator should result in hatching rates no more than 5% lower …


Demography Of Whooping Cranes In The Eastern Migratory Population, SARAH J. CONVERSE, RICHARD P. URBANEK 2010 U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Demography Of Whooping Cranes In The Eastern Migratory Population, Sarah J. Converse, Richard P. Urbanek

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

The ultimate success of the whooping crane (Grus americana) reintroduction to eastern North America rests on adequate demographic performance of the population. We are undertaking a population viability analysis (PVA) of the eastern migratory population in order to evaluate progress toward the fundamental population objective, to better understand the critical demographic thresholds that must be met to fulfill this objective, and, most importantly, to support management decision-making. The initial phase in the PVA development process involves estimation of demographic parameters to be used in later population modeling phases. Multi-state models provide an appropriate analytic framework for estimation, wherein …


Sandhill Crane Staging And Whooping Crane Migratory Stopover Dynamics In Response To River Management Activities On The Central Platte River, Nebraska, Usa, FELIPE CHAVEZ-RAMIREZ 2010 Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust

Sandhill Crane Staging And Whooping Crane Migratory Stopover Dynamics In Response To River Management Activities On The Central Platte River, Nebraska, Usa, Felipe Chavez-Ramirez

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

The Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) is a critical stopover for migrating whooping cranes (Grus americana) and the most important staging area for sandhill cranes (G. canadensis) in North America. Due to reduced water flows caused by human activities, the Platte River no longer follows its traditional hydrograph which consisted of high spring flows that produced scouring action that eliminated vegetation. To provide adequate crane roosting habitat during stopover and staging periods, annual and woody vegetation has been mechanically cleared on eastern portions of the CPRV since 1980. Staging sandhill crane riverine roosting area has decreased …


Icf Conservation Education: Bridging Crane Conservation And The International Education Community, JOAN GARLAND, KORIE KLINK 2010 International Crane Foundation

Icf Conservation Education: Bridging Crane Conservation And The International Education Community, Joan Garland, Korie Klink

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Education, at multiple levels with audiences in Wisconsin, Florida, Texas, and along the flyways where sandhill (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G. americana) sometimes find themselves in close quarters with people, is the key to protecting North America's cranes. The migration of these birds highlights the dependence of cranes and other wildlife on wetlands along the migration routes. Most of these wetlands are privately owned, so the decisions and conservation outlook of future generations are critical to the survival of these cranes. The International Crane Foundation's (ICF) conservation education programs and materials focus on the importance of …


Current Status Of Lesser Sandhill Cranes In Yakutia, INGA BYSYKATOVA, SERGEY SLEPTSOV, NIKOLAY VASILIEV 2010 Institute of Biological Problems of the Permafrost Zone

Current Status Of Lesser Sandhill Cranes In Yakutia, Inga Bysykatova, Sergey Sleptsov, Nikolay Vasiliev

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

In Yakutia, the sandhill crane (Grus canadensis canadensis) was considered a common bird in 1957 on the Primorie tundra from the Kolyma River to the Alazeya River. In 1980 the area of the species’ supposed breeding grounds within the Kolyma- Indigirka interfluve comprised 34,600 km2. In 1984-85, the breeding grounds extended west to the Sundrun River, with the total area reaching 49,400 km2. At present, the westernmost sandhill crane range is on the tundra along the lower reaches of the Berelekh River. This region joins the higher density Siberian crane (G. leucogeranus) range, so that the …


The Response Of Nesting Mississippi Sandhill Cranes To Growing Season Prescribed Fires, LAUREN BILLODEAUX, SCOTT HEREFORD, SAMI GRAY 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

The Response Of Nesting Mississippi Sandhill Cranes To Growing Season Prescribed Fires, Lauren Billodeaux, Scott Hereford, Sami Gray

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Prescribed burning is the most natural and cost effective method of restoring and maintaining the coastal longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannah ecosystem that provides feeding and nesting areas for the critically endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (MSC, Grus canadensis pulla). Though growing season burns have shown the greatest results in controlling encroaching shrubs and pines as compared to dormant season burns, burning in the spring and early summer has the potential to disrupt the nesting activities of the MSC population. In order to address both the short and long term needs of this crane population, we make every …


Summary Of Sandhill Crane Sport Harvest In Canada 1975-2006, ADRIANNA C. ARAYA, KAMMIE L. KRUSE, KEITH D. WARNER 2010 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Migratory Birds and State Programs

Summary Of Sandhill Crane Sport Harvest In Canada 1975-2006, Adrianna C. Araya, Kammie L. Kruse, Keith D. Warner

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Knowledge of harvest in all areas where the mid-continent population (MCP) of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) occurs is critical to managing the population in a sustainable manner. The harvest of MCP in the U.S. has been well documented; however, the harvest in Canada has received less attention. The Canadian Wildlife Service initiated a National Harvest Survey program in 1967, but all sampling variables were not directly comparable until 1975. In this paper, we summarize crane harvest in Canada during the 1975-2006 hunting seasons for Saskatchewan and Manitoba, the 2 provinces with significant sport hunting harvest of sandhill cranes. …


A Retrospective Of Whooping Cranes In Captivity, CINDI BARRETT, THOMAS V. STEHN 2010 Livingston, TX

A Retrospective Of Whooping Cranes In Captivity, Cindi Barrett, Thomas V. Stehn

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Early records of captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) were compiled from historical files kept at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge and other literature. Additional early records of captive whooping cranes in Europe were discovered. Annual numbers and location for all captive whooping cranes were tabulated. Starting in 1949, initial attempts at breeding the species in captivity were conducted opportunistically with a few injured birds captured from the wild. Acaptive breeding flock was started in 1966 at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, from second eggs collected in Canada from the only remaining wild flock. In 1989, the flock …


Demoiselle Cranes On Agricultural Lands In The Ukraine, YURIY ANDRYUSHCHENKO 2010 Azov-Black Sea Ornithological Station

Demoiselle Cranes On Agricultural Lands In The Ukraine, Yuriy Andryushchenko

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

In Eurasia, the western range of the demoiselle crane (Anthropoides virgo) includes the southeast of Ukraine. Here the species nests, forms flying and pre-migrating concentrations, and participates in migration. The number of demoiselle cranes in April-June is about 600-700 individuals (200-250 nesting pairs), and toward the end of the year the population can reach 900-1000 individuals. Of cranes observed during 2000-2008 in the Crimea, 42.3% of pairs (n = 151) nested on agricultural fields: 21.5% on virgin land, 16.1% on cropland, and 3.4% on fallow lands. Principal characteristics of the demoiselle crane nesting locations were wavy relief, scarce herbage, …


Possible Competition Between Waterfowl And Sandhill Cranes At Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge, Tennessee, DAVID A. ABORN 2010 University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Possible Competition Between Waterfowl And Sandhill Cranes At Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge, Tennessee, David A. Aborn

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

As a result of crop planting for waterfowl, numbers of eastern greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) staging and overwintering at the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge in eastern Tennessee have sharply increased over the last 30-40 years. Peak numbers of wintering cranes have reached 14,000, and this large increase in crane numbers raises the possibility that they may be competing with waterfowl for food and space. I examined broad-scale changes in waterfowl numbers using Christmas Bird Count data, as well as small-scale changes using observations of waterfowl numbers and locations in relation to cranes on individual days. Preliminary results …


Effects Of Changes In Agriculture And Abundance Of Snow Geese On Carrying Capacity Of Sandhill Cranes During Spring, Aaron T. Pearse, Gary L. Krapu, David A. Brandt 2010 U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Effects Of Changes In Agriculture And Abundance Of Snow Geese On Carrying Capacity Of Sandhill Cranes During Spring, Aaron T. Pearse, Gary L. Krapu, David A. Brandt

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

The Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) in Nebraska is a key spring staging area for approximately 80% of the midcontinent population of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis). Evidence that cranes currently are acquiring fat less efficiently than in the past along with a large increase in use of the CPRVby snow geese (Chen caerulescens) led us to evaluate waste-corn availability and index spatial and temporal variation in abundance of sandhill cranes and waterfowl using the CPRV. We also developed a predictive model to assess impact of changes in availability of corn under past, present, and potential future conditions. Predicted …


Mississippi Sandhill Crane Chicks Produced From Cryopreserved Semen, ANAHID M. PAHLAWANIAN, MEGAN L. SAVOIE, VANESSA PEERY, BETSY L. DRESSER, S. P. LEIBO 2010 Audubon Nature Institute Center for Research of Endangered Species

Mississippi Sandhill Crane Chicks Produced From Cryopreserved Semen, Anahid M. Pahlawanian, Megan L. Savoie, Vanessa Peery, Betsy L. Dresser, S. P. Leibo

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

The Mississippi sandhill crane (MSC, Grus canadensis pulla), 1 of 6 subspecies of sandhill cranes, is classified as critically endangered and was placed on the United States' List of Endangered Fish and Wildlife in 1973. For 13 years starting in 1996, the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species (ACRES) and Freeport-McMoran Species Survival Center (SSC) in New Orleans have been contributing to the MSC Recovery Program. Through successful captive propagation of MSCs by use of natural breeding and artificial insemination, more than 150 chicks raised at SSC have been released into the wild population at the MSC National …


Rural Inhabitant Perceptions Of Sandhill Cranes In Northern Mexico Wintering Areas, INGRID BARCELÓ,, JULIA RIVERA LÓPEZ, FELIPE CHÁVEZ-RAMÍREZ 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln; and Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust

Rural Inhabitant Perceptions Of Sandhill Cranes In Northern Mexico Wintering Areas, Ingrid Barceló,, Julia Rivera López, Felipe Chávez-Ramírez

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

While a large proportion of the sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) population winters in northern Mexico, little information is available regarding conservation status of wetlands and human dimension issues. We conducted preliminary interviews of rural inhabitants living near wetlands used by cranes in 3 Mexican estates. One hundred percent of interviewees affirmed to know cranes, see them regularly (100%), and were capable of describing cranes. Winter is the time most have seen cranes (78%) with fall being second (20%). Most cranes were observed in lakes (56%), agriculture fields (35%), and cattle troughs (2%). Most responded to have seen 0-100 …


Assessing Sandhill Crane Flight Alterations To Power Lines In Southcentral Wisconsin, KIMBERLY H. NESS, ANNE E. LACY 2010 International Crane Foundation

Assessing Sandhill Crane Flight Alterations To Power Lines In Southcentral Wisconsin, Kimberly H. Ness, Anne E. Lacy

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

We examined how weather and power line type affected abrupt flight alterations of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) near electric lines in south-central Wisconsin at 4 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fall crane roost count sites near the Wisconsin River in Adams, Columbia, and Iowa counties between September and November 2007. We selected 4 distribution (10-12 m tall, <50 kV) and 2 transmission lines (>20 m tall, >110 kV) in high crane density areas near corn fields within 1.6 km of either the Wisconsin River or local roosting wetland. We recorded frequencies of 3 types of abrupt flight alterations near power lines across 1-2 …


Behavior Comparisons Of Two Rearing Protocols For Whooping Cranes Raised By Costumed Caregivers And Trained For An Ultralight-Led Migration, GLENN H. OLSEN, JOHN B. FRENCH 2010 U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Behavior Comparisons Of Two Rearing Protocols For Whooping Cranes Raised By Costumed Caregivers And Trained For An Ultralight-Led Migration, Glenn H. Olsen, John B. French

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Whooping crane (Grus americana) colts are raised at USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland for the first 40-60 days of a chick's life as part of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP) ultralight-led reintroduction. Numbers raised for WCEP are increasing each year. Up to 2005, we raised whooping crane chicks in the Propagation Building where there are 10 indoor/outdoor pens, 8 full pens, and 2 half-size pens. In 2005 WCEP proposed increasing the number of colts reared to 20-24, numbers beyond the capacity of the facility. To accommodate this greater number of chicks, we modified several outdoor …


Mammalian Nest Predation In Mississippi Sandhill Cranes, ROSE BUTLER 2010 University of New Orleans

Mammalian Nest Predation In Mississippi Sandhill Cranes, Rose Butler

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Low recruitment is the largest challenge facing the recovery of the critically endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (MSC, Grus canadensis pulla). Lack of information on nest predation and the impacts of specific nest predator species hinder effective management to lower nest predation rates. I have completed my first year of a 2-year research project on mammalian predation at the MSC National Wildlife Refuge in Gautier, Mississippi. I aim to identify common nest predators, determine if nest predation rates are higher in certain nesting habitats than others, and if different mammalian predators are more common in certain nesting habitats than others. …


Three White Cranes, Two Flyways, One World, SARA GAVNEY MOORE, JOAN GARLAND, ZHANG JUAN, MARIA VLADIMIRTSEVA 2010 International Crane Foundation

Three White Cranes, Two Flyways, One World, Sara Gavney Moore, Joan Garland, Zhang Juan, Maria Vladimirtseva

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

The International Crane Foundation, together with Beijing Brooks Education Center in China and the Institute for Biological Problems of the Cryolithozone in Russia, is implementing a multi-year education project targeting local communities along the eastern crane flyways in the United States and East Asia. The education activities focus on the importance of wetlands, wildlife, and other natural resources from the perspective of local communities and are designed to enhance local leadership for education efforts. In the U.S. project activities are integrated with education programs centering on the eastern migratory whooping crane (Grus americana) population, integrating classroom activities and …


Preliminary Wintering Counts And New Locations Of Sandhill Cranes In Mexico, INGRID BARCELÓ, EDGAR G. LÓPEZ, FELIPE CHÁVEZ-RAMÍREZ 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Preliminary Wintering Counts And New Locations Of Sandhill Cranes In Mexico, Ingrid Barceló, Edgar G. López, Felipe Chávez-Ramírez

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) undertake a migration twice a year, when more than 400,000 cranes cross the United States from the Arctic of North America and Eastern Siberia to the southwest U.S. and north central Mexico. Although the sandhill crane has been studied intensely, few studies have been done on their Mexican wintering grounds. Little is known about what proportion of the sandhill crane population migrates to Mexico, and there is even less information regarding its dispersion. During winter 2007-2008 we surveyed 30 wetlands in the Chihuahuan Desert ecoregion in northern Mexico, recording presence/absence and number of sandhill …


Leg Problems And Power Line Interactions In The Florida Resident Flock Of Whooping Cranes, JAIMIE L. MILLER, MARILYN G. SPALDING, MARTIN J. FOLK 2010 University of Florida

Leg Problems And Power Line Interactions In The Florida Resident Flock Of Whooping Cranes, Jaimie L. Miller, Marilyn G. Spalding, Martin J. Folk

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

We retrospectively reviewed a database with over 1,800 health entries from 296 captive-reared whooping cranes (Grus americana) released in central Florida and 10 wild-fledged chicks from 1992 to 2007. Fifty percent of the study population (n = 306) had 1 or more leg problems that were placed into 4 broad categories: power line interactions (n = 39), other trauma (n = 94), deformities (n = 43), and miscellaneous conditions (n = 106). More males (n = 26, 67%) had power line interactions than females (n = 13, 33%). The majority of these 39 birds died (57%), while the …


First Breeding Records And Historical Status Of Sandhill Cranes In New England, SCOTT M. MELVIN 2010 Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife

First Breeding Records And Historical Status Of Sandhill Cranes In New England, Scott M. Melvin

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) nested at 4 sites in south-central Maine between 2000 and 2008 and at single sites in western Massachusetts and west-central Vermont in 2007 and 2008, continuing their eastward range expansion. Of 13 nests observed, 5 were in a lacustrine marsh, 2 were in a riverine marsh, and 2 were in beaver-impounded palustrine marshes, all dominated by cattail (Typha spp.); 2 were in lacustrine fen habitat dominated by sedges (Carex spp.), sphagnum, and leatherleaf (Chamaedaphne calyculata); 1 was in a lacustrine fen dominated by slender sedge (Carex lasiocarpa …


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