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3,034 full-text articles. Page 46 of 51.

Assured Water Supply Laws In The Sustainability Context, Lincoln L. Davies 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Assured Water Supply Laws In The Sustainability Context, Lincoln L. Davies

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

By juxtaposing five western states’ existing assured supply laws, this Article provides a preliminary assessment of whether, and how, assured supply laws can best promote sustainability—and, by extension, make at least one area of environmental law more like sustainability law. The Article reaches three principal conclusions. First, it finds that, as they appear to, assured supply laws in fact promote sustainability. Second, the extent to which assured supply laws likely promote sustainability greatly varies by state, because these laws’ policy designs also depend on the state of enactment. Finally, additional work is needed to provide a more concrete assessment ...


Optimizing Land Use And Water Supply Planning: A Path To Sustainability?, Randele Kanouse, Douglas Wallace 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Optimizing Land Use And Water Supply Planning: A Path To Sustainability?, Randele Kanouse, Douglas Wallace

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

The rise of the environmental movement and the growing public embrace of ecological values roughly coincided with the end of the dambuilding era. By the 1970s, most of the good sites for dams had already been taken, and those that remained, such as California’s North Coast rivers, were increasingly valued as natural and recreational resources that should be permanently protected. At the same time, California’s population continued to swell, from under 20 million in 1970 to nearly 38 million today. How did these trends affect water supply development in California? Among other impacts, the average time a major ...


Alice In Groundwater Land: Water Supply Assessments And Subsurface Water Supplies, Kevin M. O'Brien 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Alice In Groundwater Land: Water Supply Assessments And Subsurface Water Supplies, Kevin M. O'Brien

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

The purpose of this Article is to explore the preparation of Water Supply Assessments in the context of subsurface water supplies. The term “subsurface water supplies” is used here rather than “groundwater” because, as discussed below, the proponent of a development project may propose to utilize a subsurface water supply (such as water produced from beneath the surface of land via a well or a flowing spring) that is not properly classified as groundwater because it falls within the legal definition of subterranean stream flow. In such a case, the supply would be subject to the water rights permitting jurisdiction ...


Friant Dam Holding Contracts: Not An Entitlement To Water Supply Under Sb 610, Barry Epstein 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Friant Dam Holding Contracts: Not An Entitlement To Water Supply Under Sb 610, Barry Epstein

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

Nearly ten years ago, California’s Legislature enacted Senate Bill (SB) 610, a new law requiring that any proposed large development project receiving local land use approvals be supported by a Water Supply Assessment demonstrating available water supply to meet the project’s 20-year forecast water demand. While some, perhaps most, proposed large development projects are within the service territory of large, public or private municipal water purveyors whose entitlement to the water they deliver is well-established (though not necessarily adequate or secure), developments outside the service territory of such water purveyors can require more scrutiny of the underlying water ...


Show Me The Water Plan: Urban Water Management Plans And California’S Water Supply Adequacy Laws, Ellen Hanak 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Show Me The Water Plan: Urban Water Management Plans And California’S Water Supply Adequacy Laws, Ellen Hanak

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

This Article reviews the effectiveness of California’s strategy of using enabling legislation and passive enforcement to encourage more integrated local water and land use planning. To shed light on the effectiveness of the current policy framework, the Article begins with a critical overview of the Urban Water Management Planning process, drawing on a detailed analysis of plans submitted in the early 2000s. It then evaluates how water supply assessments are proceeding, with a particular emphasis on steps used to identify adequacy, drawing on telephone surveys of land use authorities and water utilities conducted by the author in 2004 and ...


The Relationship Between Water Supply And Land Use Planning: Leading Cases Under The California Environmental Quality Act, James G. Moose 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Relationship Between Water Supply And Land Use Planning: Leading Cases Under The California Environmental Quality Act, James G. Moose

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

This Article will survey and analyze this 2007 California Supreme Court decision and the key appellate court cases leading up to and following it, all of which address the relationship between land use planning and water supply planning under CEQA. The Article will also address a subsequent California Supreme Court decision addressing the adequacy of the EIR for one of the most significant water supply programs in recent decades, the so-called CALFED Record of Decision, which reflected, as of the year 2000, a long-term strategy for addressing ecological problems occurring in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta while increasing the reliability ...


Conservation Of What?: An Introduction To The Issue, Paul Stanton Kibel, Anthony A. Austin 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Conservation Of What?: An Introduction To The Issue, Paul Stanton Kibel, Anthony A. Austin

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

No abstract provided.


How California Local Governments Became Both Water Suppliers And Planners, A. Dan Tarlock 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

How California Local Governments Became Both Water Suppliers And Planners, A. Dan Tarlock

Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal

The paradox of California is that growth is concentrated in arid southern California but most of the state’s water supply, with the exception of the Colorado and Owens Rivers, originates in the north. This has meant that the state has had to bring massive amounts of water to the south to support the state’s celebrated continued population growth in order to compensate for California’s “bad hydrology.”1 From 1940 to 2007, California’s population increased from 6,950,000 to 37,786,000, and that growth has stressed the state’s capacity to meet the demand for ...


Agenda: Opportunities And Obstacles To Reducing The Environmental Footprint Of Natural Gas Development In The Uintah Basin, Utah State University. Bingham Entrepreneurship and Energy Research Center, University of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center. Intermountain Oil and Gas BMP Project, Houston Advanced Research Center. Environmentally Friendly Drilling Systems Program 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Agenda: Opportunities And Obstacles To Reducing The Environmental Footprint Of Natural Gas Development In The Uintah Basin, Utah State University. Bingham Entrepreneurship And Energy Research Center, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center. Intermountain Oil And Gas Bmp Project, Houston Advanced Research Center. Environmentally Friendly Drilling Systems Program

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

A public workshop to discuss “Opportunities and Constraints to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development” was held in Vernal, Utah on October 14, 2010 at the Vernal campus of Utah State University. The workshop was sponsored by Utah State University, The Bingham Energy Research Center; The University of Colorado Natural Resources Law Center; and the Houston Advanced Research Center, Environmentally Friendly Drilling Program.

The meeting included presentations and panel discussions on:

  • Trends and environmental issues related to natural gas development
  • Examples of environmental innovations being used in the Uintah Basin
  • Examples of innovation & tools from outside the Uintah ...


Slides: The Environmentally Friendly Drilling Systems Program, David Burnett 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: The Environmentally Friendly Drilling Systems Program, David Burnett

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: David Burnett, Texas A&M University and Houston Advanced Research Center

44 slides


Slides: Acts: Anadarko Completion Transport System, Jeff Dufresne 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: Acts: Anadarko Completion Transport System, Jeff Dufresne

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Jeff Dufresne, Completions Manager, Anadarko Corporation

18 slides


Slides: Assessing Opportunities And Barriers To Reducing The Environmental Footprint Of Oil And Gas Development In Utah, Douglas Jackson-Smith, Lorien Belton, Brian Gentry, Gene Theodori 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: Assessing Opportunities And Barriers To Reducing The Environmental Footprint Of Oil And Gas Development In Utah, Douglas Jackson-Smith, Lorien Belton, Brian Gentry, Gene Theodori

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Dr. Douglas Jackson-Smith, Utah State University--Logan Campus

37 slides


Slides: Drilling Waste, Blake Scott 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: Drilling Waste, Blake Scott

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Blake Scott, Scott Environmental Services, Inc.

24 slides


Slides: Intermountain Oil And Gas Bmp Project, Kathryn Mutz 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: Intermountain Oil And Gas Bmp Project, Kathryn Mutz

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Kathryn Mutz, Natural Resources Law Center, University of Colorado at Boulder

21 slides


Slides: A Working Model For Oil And Gas Produced Water Treatment, Lee Schafer 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: A Working Model For Oil And Gas Produced Water Treatment, Lee Schafer

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Lee Schafer, Integrity Production Services, Inc., for Anticline Disposal LLC

11 slides


Slides: Enhanced Reclamation Program, Stephanie Tomkinson 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: Enhanced Reclamation Program, Stephanie Tomkinson

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Stephanie Tomkinson, Senior Biologist, QEP Company

33 slides


Slides: Geospatial Decision Support For Shale Gas Site Development, Malcolm Williamson, Jackson Cothren, Peter Smith 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: Geospatial Decision Support For Shale Gas Site Development, Malcolm Williamson, Jackson Cothren, Peter Smith

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Malcolm Williamson, Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, University of Arkansas

50 slides


Slides: Engaging Stakeholders, Duane Zavadil 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Slides: Engaging Stakeholders, Duane Zavadil

Opportunities and Obstacles to Reducing the Environmental Footprint of Natural Gas Development in Uintah Basin (October 14)

Presenter: Duane Zavadil, Bill Barrett Corporation

5 slides


Recapturing The Anacostia River: The Center Of 21st Century Washington, Dc, Uwe Steven Brandes 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

Recapturing The Anacostia River: The Center Of 21st Century Washington, Dc, Uwe Steven Brandes

Golden Gate University Law Review

For decades, the Anacostia River -- its shoreline, waterfront neighborhoods and watershed -- has been neglected by parties responsible for its stewardship. The river's water is severely polluted; obsolete transportation infrastructure isolates neighborhoods and divides Washington into areas "east" and "west" of the river; public parks are underutilized and suffer from chronic disinvestment; and several communities along the river are among the poorest in the metropolitan Washington region. With the river forming a boundary between race and class and with over 70 percent of the river's lands in public ownership, the need to rethink the management of this urban river ...


The Detroit Riverfront Conservancy: A Public-Private Partnership Striving To Reclaim The Detroit River, Betsy Hemming 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Detroit Riverfront Conservancy: A Public-Private Partnership Striving To Reclaim The Detroit River, Betsy Hemming

Golden Gate University Law Review

This paper will detail the vision for a transformed Detroit Riverfront, the efforts to realize the vision, and lessons learned to date. Specifically, the article will focus on the creation of the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, Inc. (DRFC), a non-profit organization that is charged with facilitating the transformation through a strong public-private partnership. Section I will provide the background on the Detroit River, important demographics regarding the riverfront and early work on the vision. Section II and III will highlight the work of the DRFC and the project details. Finally, Section IV covers key success factors and challenges, focusing on important ...


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