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2853 full-text articles. Page 4 of 47.

Governing The Gradient: Clarity And Discretion At The Water's Edge, Jamison E. Colburn 2017 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

Governing The Gradient: Clarity And Discretion At The Water's Edge, Jamison E. Colburn

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Catskill Mountains Chapter Of Trout Unlimited, Inc. V. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Benjamin W. Almy 2017 Alexander Blewitt III School of Law at the University of Montana

Catskill Mountains Chapter Of Trout Unlimited, Inc. V. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Benjamin W. Almy

Public Land and Resources Law Review

Trout Unlimited’s effort to overturn the EPA’s Water Transfers Rule was stifled by the Second Circuit. The court’s comprehensive Chevron analysis determined that while the NPDES Water Transfers Rule may be at odds with the Clean Water Act’s mission, it was based on a reasonable interpretation of the statute’s ambiguous language, and therefore it did not violate the Administrative Procedures Act.


State Regulation Of Oil And Gas Pools On State, Federal, Indian And Fee Lands, C. Gene Samberson 2017 University of New Mexico

State Regulation Of Oil And Gas Pools On State, Federal, Indian And Fee Lands, C. Gene Samberson

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Richardson, Elmo R., The Politics Of Conservation: Crusades And Controversies, 1897-1913, Ernest A. Engelbert 2017 University of New Mexico

Richardson, Elmo R., The Politics Of Conservation: Crusades And Controversies, 1897-1913, Ernest A. Engelbert

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Milner, J. B., Community Planning: A Casebook On Law And Administration, Ira Michael Heyman 2017 University of New Mexico

Milner, J. B., Community Planning: A Casebook On Law And Administration, Ira Michael Heyman

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Choosing Your Ground On The Endangered Species Act: How Do The Ninth, Tenth, And District Of Columbia Circuit Courts Of Appeal Evaluate Water Management Decisions Made By Federal Water Agencies?, Michael Kinsey 2017 Pace University

Choosing Your Ground On The Endangered Species Act: How Do The Ninth, Tenth, And District Of Columbia Circuit Courts Of Appeal Evaluate Water Management Decisions Made By Federal Water Agencies?, Michael Kinsey

Pace Environmental Law Review

The purpose of this article is twofold. First, federal agencies are responsible for the development and implementation of ESA documents, and knowing what a court will look for and at when that document is challenged can help the agencies to develop a document that can better survive court review. Second, a plaintiff who challenges such a document can benefit from that same knowledge, by knowing which elements of the document to best challenge. The intent of this article is to provide practitioners, both agency and non-, with an introduction to that knowledge, to identify some of those difficulties, dangers, and ...


Migratory Waterbird Conservation At The Flyway Level: Distilling The Added Value Of Aewa In Relation To The Ramsar Convention, Melissa Lewis 2017 Tilburg University, Netherlands

Migratory Waterbird Conservation At The Flyway Level: Distilling The Added Value Of Aewa In Relation To The Ramsar Convention, Melissa Lewis

Pace Environmental Law Review

In June 1995, the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) was adopted, and this instrument remains the only legally binding waterbird Agreement in the CMS Family. However, while AEWA has been lauded as a very promising instrument, the concern has also been raised that the Agreement “has a large potential scope for the duplication of obligations, especially with regard to the protection of wetland habitats, given the operation of the Ramsar Convention”. The existing literature thus recognizes that overlap between AEWA and the Ramsar Convention is potentially problematic. It fails, however, to provide a detailed analysis of ...


Alternatives For Recovery Of Attorney's Fees In Environmental Litigation, Fritz Ledbetter 2017 University of New Mexico

Alternatives For Recovery Of Attorney's Fees In Environmental Litigation, Fritz Ledbetter

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Res Judicata: Will It Stop Instream Flows From Being The Wave Of The Future?, Harold A. Ranquist 2017 University of New Mexico

Res Judicata: Will It Stop Instream Flows From Being The Wave Of The Future?, Harold A. Ranquist

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Statecraft, Domestic Politics, And Foreign Policymaking: The El Chamizal Dispute, Albert E. Utton 2017 University of New Mexico

Statecraft, Domestic Politics, And Foreign Policymaking: The El Chamizal Dispute, Albert E. Utton

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Public Participation And Natural Resource Decision-Making: The Case Of The Rare Ii Decisions, Paul Mohai 2017 University of New Mexico

Public Participation And Natural Resource Decision-Making: The Case Of The Rare Ii Decisions, Paul Mohai

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


United States V. Barthelmess Ranch Corp., Jonah P. Brown 2017 University of Montana School of Law

United States V. Barthelmess Ranch Corp., Jonah P. Brown

Public Land and Resources Law Review

Application of water to a beneficial use is the decisive element of a perfected water right in Montana. The BLM claimed rights to five reservoirs and one natural pothole under Montana law. The agency did not own livestock, but instead made the water available to grazing permittees. In United States v. Barthelmess Ranch Corp., the Montana Supreme Court affirmed the Montana Water Court’s holding that the BLM’s practice of making water available to others constituted a beneficial use and a perfected water right.


Hawkes Co. V. United States Army Corps Of Engineers, Sarah M. Danno 2017 University of Montana School of Law

Hawkes Co. V. United States Army Corps Of Engineers, Sarah M. Danno

Public Land and Resources Law Review

A peat mining company will not be required to obtain a permit under the Clean Water Act to discharge dredged and fill material into wetlands. The United States District Court for the District of Minnesota held that the United States Army Corps of Engineers fell short in its attempts to establish jurisdiction over the wetlands by twice failing to show a significant nexus existed between the wetlands and navigable waters. Further, the district court enjoined the Corps from asserting jurisdiction a third time because it would force the mining company through a “never ending loop” of administrative law.


Sturgeon V. Frost: A Limited Holding Reveals An Environmentally Hesitant Post-Scalia Court, Michael O'Loughlin 2017 Boston College Law School

Sturgeon V. Frost: A Limited Holding Reveals An Environmentally Hesitant Post-Scalia Court, Michael O'Loughlin

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The first environmental case before the United States Supreme Court after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, Sturgeon v. Frost, involved the National Park Service’s authority to regulate hovercraft use over a segment of river running through lands under its authority pursuant to the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. The plaintiff sought to show that the State held title to navigable waters within the State, and that, therefore, the National Park Service did not have authority to enforce its regulation. The parties invoked precedent and argued for textual analysis of the at-issue statute, but the United States Court ...


Microbeads And The Toxics Use Reduction Act: Preventing Pollution At Its Source, Davis Truslow 2017 Boston College Law School

Microbeads And The Toxics Use Reduction Act: Preventing Pollution At Its Source, Davis Truslow

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

Microbead pollution presents a significant threat to human health and the environment. As a result, Congress enacted a national ban on microbeads in 2015. This ban is a drastic, reactionary measure that fails to address the continued threat posed by already existing pollution. In addition, the ban represents a continued preference for the command-and-control regulatory framework that failed to prevent microbead pollution in the first place. In contrast, pollution prevention, an alternative regulatory technique adopted by Congress as national policy in 1990, more efficiently prevents pollution by focusing on reducing pollution at its source. In 1989, Massachusetts became the first ...


Inverse Condemnation And Fracking Disasters: Government Liability For The Environmental Consequences Of Hydraulic Fracturing Under A Constitutional Takings Theory, Joseph Belza 2017 Boston College Law School

Inverse Condemnation And Fracking Disasters: Government Liability For The Environmental Consequences Of Hydraulic Fracturing Under A Constitutional Takings Theory, Joseph Belza

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The practice of hydraulic fracturing, more commonly known as fracking, risks a number of dangerous environmental consequences. Notably, fracking operations can contaminate the underlying water table. Contamination of groundwater can disrupt the access of a nearby property to both potable drinking water and viable commercial irrigation. Usually, when a fracking operation results in this kind of groundwater contamination, affected plaintiffs sue the operator of the rig. This Note proposes that similarly situated plaintiffs also name a new defendant in these actions: the state agency that granted the fracking permit. The governmental actor could bear liability under a constitutional theory of ...


The Public Trust As An Antimonopoly Doctrine, Michael C. Blumm, Aurora Paulsen Moses 2017 Lewis & Clark Law School

The Public Trust As An Antimonopoly Doctrine, Michael C. Blumm, Aurora Paulsen Moses

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

The public trust doctrine originated—and has persisted in American law—as antimonopoly protection. From the time of its recognition by American courts in the early nineteenth century, the doctrine has protected the public against private monopolization of natural resources, beginning with tidal waters and wild animals. Ensuing public trust case law has extended the scope of trust protection to other important natural resources, including non-tidal and non-navigable waters, and land-based resources like parks. Courts are now considering the trust doctrine’s application to the atmosphere. Although there is a considerable body of legal scholarship on the public trust, the ...


Whose Standards Control? Maine V. Mccanhy And The Federal, State, And Tribal Battle Over Water Quality Regulation, Joseph Paul Mortelliti 2017 University of Connecticut School of Law

Whose Standards Control? Maine V. Mccanhy And The Federal, State, And Tribal Battle Over Water Quality Regulation, Joseph Paul Mortelliti

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

This Note considers the longstanding clash between the United States government and state governments over the management of intrastate waters through the lens of Maine v. McCarthy, an ongoing federal lawsuit. McCarthy confronts whether the United States Environmental Protection Agency can require state water quality standards to specifically safeguard the health and cultural practices of Maine’s Indian tribes, particularly sustenance fishing. A panoply of legal and political factors gave rise to and shaped the course of the litigation, ranging from tribal sovereignty to agency discretion and political gamesmanship. After evaluating the litigants’ arguments and examining previous regulatory collisions between ...


Nutrient Water Quality Trading: A Market-Based Solution To Water Pollution In The Natural State*, Nathan R. Finch 2017 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Nutrient Water Quality Trading: A Market-Based Solution To Water Pollution In The Natural State*, Nathan R. Finch

Arkansas Law Review

No abstract provided.


Valuing Sacred Tribal Waters Within Prior Appropriation, Michelle Bryan 2017 University of Montana School of Law

Valuing Sacred Tribal Waters Within Prior Appropriation, Michelle Bryan

Natural Resources Journal

Throughout the world water plays a central role in the spirituality of indigenous peoples. Focusing on the American West, this article first describes how tribal water needs touch upon the sacred and then explains how both federal law and state prior appropriation doctrine fail to adequately protect these important sacred views of water. Pivoting away from the classic federal law arguments, the article then advocates for an evolution in state water law regimes to provide yet unrecognized protections for tribal sacred waters. Because international law plays an increasing role in this issue, the article also explores case studies from Ireland ...


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