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Doug Kahn: Class Master, Dennis E. Ross 2016 University of Michigan Law School

Doug Kahn: Class Master, Dennis E. Ross

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

Doug has always been a bit of a departure from the professorial norm. Teaching for Doug was no accommodation to the job, no activity collateral to his true ambition, but rather an openly genuine attempt to engage his students and pull them into a subject that he obviously loved. His evident joy when in front of a class closed any distance with his students, no small feat considering the subject matter. Tax is forbidding territory for many, and Doug was justifiably known for his refusal to dumb the material down. Thus, much of his class may have been there reluctantly ...


Doug Kahn - A Personal Appreciation, Patricia D. White 2016 University of Miami School of Law

Doug Kahn - A Personal Appreciation, Patricia D. White

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

Doug Kahn has a booming laugh and an infectious enthusiasm for his subject. I am one of the legions of students who were infected by the tax bug—thanks to Doug. It is appropriate that, on the occasion of his retirement, some of us who were most infected reflect on Doug’s influence in our lives. In my case this is easy. I owe the basic contours of my career to Doug. I graduated from Michigan Law in 1974. Times were different then. I graduated never having had a female instructor. There were no women on the faculty. Only thirteen ...


Nfib V. Sebelius And The Individual Mandate: Thoughts On The Tax/Regulation Distinction, Kyle D. Logue 2016 University of Michigan Law School

Nfib V. Sebelius And The Individual Mandate: Thoughts On The Tax/Regulation Distinction, Kyle D. Logue

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

When Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the opinion of the Court in National Federation of Independent Businesses v. Sebelius (NFIB) explaining the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) minimum essential coverage provision (sometimes referred to as the individual mandate), he reasoned that the mandate—or, more precisely, the enforcement provision that accompanied the mandate (the Shared Responsibility Payment or SRP)—could be understood as a tax on the failure to purchase health insurance. According to this view, the enactment of the mandate and its accompanying enforcement provisions fell within Congress’s virtually unlimited power to “lay and collect ...


Book Review: International Tax Planning. By Barry Spitz. London, England: Butterworth & Co. Ltd., 1972. Pp. Xxiii, 159. $12.15 (U.S.)., Donald O. Clark 2016 McClain, Mellen, Bowling & Hickman

Book Review: International Tax Planning. By Barry Spitz. London, England: Butterworth & Co. Ltd., 1972. Pp. Xxiii, 159. $12.15 (U.S.)., Donald O. Clark

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro 2016 NYU School of Law

The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

The last thirty years have witnessed rising income and wealth concentration among the top 0.1 percent of the population, leading to intense political debate regarding how, if at all, policymakers should respond. Often, this debate emphasizes the tools of public economics, and in particular optimal income taxation. However, while these tools can help us in evaluating the issues raised by high-end inequality, their extreme reductionism – which, in other settings, often offers significant analytic payoffs – here proves to have serious drawbacks. This paper addresses what we do and don’t learn from the optimal income tax literature regarding high-end inequality ...


The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro 2016 NYU School of Law

The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

The last thirty years have witnessed rising income and wealth concentration among the top 0.1 percent of the population, leading to intense political debate regarding how, if at all, policymakers should respond. Often, this debate emphasizes the tools of public economics, and in particular optimal income taxation. However, while these tools can help us in evaluating the issues raised by high-end inequality, their extreme reductionism – which, in other settings, often offers significant analytic payoffs – here proves to have serious drawbacks. This paper addresses what we do and don’t learn from the optimal income tax literature regarding high-end inequality ...


Replacing Havoc: Creating Rules For Sovereign Default, Edward J. Kelley 2016 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Replacing Havoc: Creating Rules For Sovereign Default, Edward J. Kelley

Cleveland State Law Review

Sovereign debt is an ongoing threat to a State’s economic stability and its citizens’ standard of living. A single occurrence of default begins a cycle in which it becomes increasingly more difficult for an indebted State to pay its debts and ensure the survival of its citizens. Because central banking systems and direct spending are often inadequate methods to boost an indebted State’s economy, a more expansive solution to sovereign debt is required. The initial solution to the growing problem of sovereign debt is an international treaty that will allow the world economy to establish monitoring mechanisms to ...


The Pro Bono Collaborative: Celebrating 10 Years Of Pro Bono Partnerships, Roger Williams University School of Law 2016 Roger Williams University

The Pro Bono Collaborative: Celebrating 10 Years Of Pro Bono Partnerships, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Pro Bono Collaborative Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


Considering Alternatives: Are There Methods Other Than The Estate And Gift Tax That Could Better Address Problems Associated With Wealth Concentration?, Ray D. Madoff 2016 Boston College Law School

Considering Alternatives: Are There Methods Other Than The Estate And Gift Tax That Could Better Address Problems Associated With Wealth Concentration?, Ray D. Madoff

Boston College Law Review

This Commentary analyzes three articles generated from the Symposium “The Centennial of the Estate and Gift Tax: Perspectives and Recommendations,” held on October 2, 2015 at Boston College Law School. This Commentary explores the underlying purpose of the estate and gift tax: eliminating wealth inequality. It then considers the three articles’ proposed alternative tax systems—namely an accession tax and a wealth tax—that could more adequately address the problem of wealth concentration, and evaluates the merits of each.


Taxing Losers, Eric D. Chason 2016 William & Mary Law School

Taxing Losers, Eric D. Chason

Faculty Publications

The U.S. tax system, like most in the world, benefits capital gains in two ways. Investors can defer paying tax until they "realize" any gain (typically by sale) rather than when the gain simply occurs via rising prices. Additionally, individual investors pay a lower, preferred rate on their long-term capital gains as compared to their other ordinary income (such as compensation or business profits).

However, investors face a burden with respect to their capital losses. Rather than allowing for unlimited capital loss deductions, the Code largely forces investors to match their capital losses against their capital gains. Limits on ...


Deep Dive, Chicago Style: A Roadmap For Understanding International Tax Reform, Michael J. Veneri Jr. 2016 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Deep Dive, Chicago Style: A Roadmap For Understanding International Tax Reform, Michael J. Veneri Jr.

The Global Business Law Review

This note discusses the potential alternatives for international tax reform and evaluates them based upon the Chicago school of economic theory principles and the ability to eliminate "tax plays." The United States could modify the existing international taxation system with (1) the 2015 Obama Administration proposals, (2) a modified territorial system as proposed by Rep. Dave Camp, (3) a credit system with source-of-income rules without the deferral privilege, or (4) formulary apportionment system based on either a single-factor or a three-factor system. By eliminating a U.S. multinational corporation's ability to participate in "tax plays," inefficient rent-seeking behavior can ...


The Corruption Of Liberal And Social Democracies, Timothy K. Kuhner 2016 Georgia State University College of Law

The Corruption Of Liberal And Social Democracies, Timothy K. Kuhner

Fordham Law Review

Thomas Piketty repeats throughout Capital in the Twenty-First Century that today’s levels of inequality are not inevitable, much less natural, and has connected the state of democracy worldwide to rising economic inequality. Wealth transfers from the state to the private sector, wealth transfers from labor to capital, and tax laws favorable to the concentration of wealth require that the participatory and representative facets of democracy be kept in check. Beyond suitable material conditions, the growth and maintenance of inequality necessitates a justificatory ideology. This Article explores the possibility that the laws of political finance can help connect the dots ...


Job Creationism, Victor Fleischer 2016 University of San Diego

Job Creationism, Victor Fleischer

Fordham Law Review

Does a low tax rate on entrepreneurial income create jobs? Tax scholars view this question as empirical in nature. But for many policymakers, voters, and even some academics, the relationship between taxes and entrepreneurship is a matter of faith. If there is a question, it is one of ideological commitment, not evidence and reason. Consider the ease with which politicians claim that tax cuts for entrepreneurs and investors create jobs and fuel economic growth. This claim would appear to be a falsifiable claim subject to empirical observation and testing. But evidence in support of the claim is, in fact, hard ...


The Social Boundaries Of Corporate Taxation, Sloan G. Speck 2016 University of Colorado Law School

The Social Boundaries Of Corporate Taxation, Sloan G. Speck

Fordham Law Review

This Article argues that, while important, efficiency considerations should not function as the sole arbiter of the boundary between corporate and conduit tax treatment. First, classical corporate taxation is, in many ways, deeply embedded within a larger network of legal and social meanings. Classical corporate taxation operates in concert with, rather than separately from, these legal and social meanings. For this reason, the rules governing entities’ tax classification should take these interrelationships into account, if not as a primary norm, then as a secondary consideration when empirical or other uncertainties preclude a clear choice based on efficiency. The social boundaries ...


Liberalism, Philanthropy, And Praxis: Realigning The Philanthropy Of The Republic And The Social Teaching Of The Church, Rob Atkinson 2016 Florida State University

Liberalism, Philanthropy, And Praxis: Realigning The Philanthropy Of The Republic And The Social Teaching Of The Church, Rob Atkinson

Fordham Law Review

This Article seeks a common ground for theists of the Abrahamist religious faiths and agnostics in the Socratic philosophical tradition on the role that the liberal state should play in advancing the two coordinate aims of traditional philanthropy: helping society’s least well off and advancing the highest forms of human excellence. It focuses particularly on Abrahamists who are orthodox Catholics and Socratics who are left-liberals, distinguishing their broad views on the liberal state’s proper philanthropic role from the far narrower views of libertarians and other right-liberals. It concludes that adherents of Catholic Social Teaching and advocates of secular ...


Registered Savings Plans And The Making Of Middle-Class Canada: Toward A Performative Theory Of Tax Policy, Lisa Philipps 2016 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Registered Savings Plans And The Making Of Middle-Class Canada: Toward A Performative Theory Of Tax Policy, Lisa Philipps

Fordham Law Review

Campaigning politicians and elected governments across Canada’s political spectrum strive to position themselves as defenders of the middle class. This is to be expected given the large proportion of the Canadian population that self-identifies as middle class. Since the term lacks precision, it is a claim that can accommodate a wide range of policy proposals. Tax policy serves as a prime vehicle for making this appeal to middle-class voters. Undoubtedly, any tax reform proposal can be examined critically to evaluate its likely distributional impacts and how well these map onto specific definitions of the middle class. This Article attempts ...


Framing Middle-Class Insecurity: Tax And The Ideology Of Unequal Economic Growth, Martha T. McCluskey 2016 SUNY Buffalo Law School

Framing Middle-Class Insecurity: Tax And The Ideology Of Unequal Economic Growth, Martha T. Mccluskey

Fordham Law Review

This Article first explains how the prevailing discourse frames federal tax support for the middle class as either consumption or redistribution, both of which appear to be essentially unproductive and potentially destructive. Second, this Article examines the expansion of state and local tax support for elite private capital. In contrast to tax support favoring the middle class, this upper-class support is accepted widely as necessary for productive economic development. Operating below the radar of prominent tax debates, this state and local tax policy reveals more starkly and perversely how prevailing views of tax rationalize inequality and austerity. This Article concludes ...


Foreword: We Are What We Tax, Mary Louise Fellows, Grace Heinecke, Linda Sugin 2016 University of Minnesota Law School

Foreword: We Are What We Tax, Mary Louise Fellows, Grace Heinecke, Linda Sugin

Fordham Law Review

On November 12 and 13, 2015, the Fordham Law Review hosted a symposium entitled We Are What We Tax. We invited scholars with a wide array of expertise inside and outside of the tax arena to consider how tax laws have shaped public and private institutions, cultural norms and hierarchies, and societal values.


How Individual Income Tax Policy Affects Entrepreneurship, David Clingingsmith, Scott Shane 2016 Case Western Reserve University

How Individual Income Tax Policy Affects Entrepreneurship, David Clingingsmith, Scott Shane

Fordham Law Review

This Article reviews the empirical literature on the effects of individual income tax policy on entrepreneurship. We find no evidence of consensus, even on relatively narrow questions such as whether individual income tax rates deter or encourage entrepreneurial entry. We believe the absence of consensus reflects both the complexity of mechanisms connecting tax policy to entrepreneurial decision making and the infeasibility of employing the most reliable empirical methods, such as experiments, in this domain.


Perpetuating Inequality By Taxing Wealth, Goldburn P. Maynard Jr. 2016 Brandeis School of Law

Perpetuating Inequality By Taxing Wealth, Goldburn P. Maynard Jr.

Fordham Law Review

This Article attempts to correct this shortcoming in the progressive argument by returning narrative to its central place in the estate tax debate. Drawing on psychological insights, I hope to underscore the difficulty of the effort to preserve progressive taxation and combat wealth inequality.


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