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Taxation As Insurance, John R. Brooks 2016 Georgetown University Law Center

Taxation As Insurance, John R. Brooks

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

A central yet often overlooked aspect of an income tax is that it acts as insurance against the risk of low income. Because a person’s payments to government are a function of income, he can be assured that in a time of low income, his tax payments will decrease and transfers will increase, while the standard benefits of governments continue to flow. Because everyone, no matter how successful, faces some risk of lost income, that assurance provides us an insurance benefit, even if our income never actually drops.


International Tax Implications Of The Organisation For Economic Co-Operation And Development Proposal To Neutralize Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements, Dean Harris 2016 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

International Tax Implications Of The Organisation For Economic Co-Operation And Development Proposal To Neutralize Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements, Dean Harris

Catholic University Law Review

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has developed a sixteen part plan titled Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS). This comment focuses on the second part of that plan; Neutralizing Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements. Mismatches have become a useful tool for corporations to achieve double non-taxation in various jurisdictions. The comment begins by laying the groundwork of what a hybrid mismatch arrangement is and the current problems and complications with them in international tax. Next, this comment addresses various jurisdictional approaches to mismatches, including: Ireland, The United Kingdom, The United States, and Denmark. The paper moves forward onto a ...


Give Taxpayers A Break: Putting The Reliance Element Back Into The Reasonable Reliance And Good Faith Defense, Ronald Z. Domsky 2016 Selected Works

Give Taxpayers A Break: Putting The Reliance Element Back Into The Reasonable Reliance And Good Faith Defense, Ronald Z. Domsky

Ronald Z. Domsky

No abstract provided.


Nfib V. Sebelius And The Individual Mandate: Thoughts On The Tax/Regulation Distinction, Kyle D. Logue 2016 University of Michigan Law School

Nfib V. Sebelius And The Individual Mandate: Thoughts On The Tax/Regulation Distinction, Kyle D. Logue

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

When Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the opinion of the Court in National Federation of Independent Businesses v. Sebelius (NFIB) explaining the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) minimum essential coverage provision (sometimes referred to as the individual mandate), he reasoned that the mandate—or, more precisely, the enforcement provision that accompanied the mandate (the Shared Responsibility Payment or SRP)—could be understood as a tax on the failure to purchase health insurance. According to this view, the enactment of the mandate and its accompanying enforcement provisions fell within Congress’s virtually unlimited power to “lay and collect ...


The Uneasy Case For The Retirement Of Douglas Kahn, Jeffrey H. Kahn 2016 Florida State University

The Uneasy Case For The Retirement Of Douglas Kahn, Jeffrey H. Kahn

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

In the fall semester of 1964, a young Douglas Kahn joined the faculty of the University of Michigan Law School. During the spring semester of 2016, he will teach his final course as a full-time faculty member. For the interim fifty two years, he has been a fixture of the Michigan law school community. As a tax professor, former student, and his son, I am pleased and honored to write this introduction for an edition of the Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review honoring Professor Kahn’s tenure at the University of Michigan.


A Grateful Testimonial To Doug Kahn, Terrence G. Perris 2016 University of Michigan Law School

A Grateful Testimonial To Doug Kahn, Terrence G. Perris

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

It is difficult for me to accept the reality that Doug Kahn is about to retire after a triumphant fifty-two year tenure as a professor at the University of Michigan Law School. For much of the nearly forty-seven years of my association with the Law School, first as a student and then as an alumnus, Doug has practically symbolized the Law School for me, as he went from being a revered teacher, to a valued mentor, to a dear friend, to a colleague and co-author, and, dare I say, to virtually a member of the family. But I am only ...


Where Does One Begin To Describe A Professor Who Literally Changed Your Life?, Kelli Turner 2016 University of Michigan Law School

Where Does One Begin To Describe A Professor Who Literally Changed Your Life?, Kelli Turner

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

A bit of background to set the stage, if you’ll indulge me. Growing up in West Bloomfield, Michigan, I was never overly ambitious, nor did I have any lofty academic goals. In particular, I never had any desire to go to law school or, for that matter, to become a lawyer. I come from a family of trial attorneys and it never interested me much. I was a numbers person and didn’t enjoy a lot of deep reading and essay writing (somewhat ironic as I’m writing this for a law journal). But when I started in public ...


Doug Kahn: The Pied Piper Of Tax Law, Barrie Lawson Loeks, Burt P. Rosen 2016 University of Michigan Law School

Doug Kahn: The Pied Piper Of Tax Law, Barrie Lawson Loeks, Burt P. Rosen

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

Doug Kahn’s love of tax law appears to be contagious. His wife was a tax lawyer, his son is now a tax law professor, and even his daughter in law is a tax lawyer. Doug may have caught the “tax disease” from his elder brother, who was also a leading tax lawyer. In politics, we have the Kennedys, the Bushes, and the Clintons; in the world of tax law, we have the Kahn family dynasty. One can only assume that the discussions around the family Thanksgiving table sliced and diced tax regulations and policies right along with the turkey ...


A Note, Robert T. Pelinka Jr. 2016 University of Michigan Law School

A Note, Robert T. Pelinka Jr.

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

I find it quite meaningful that heartwarming reflections about Douglas Kahn come very naturally to me. Perhaps that, in and of itself, says something about this incredible man. For context, my time in physical proximity to Professor Kahn came during my years as a student-athlete at the University of Michigan, where I graduated from the Ross School of Business, and the Law School. I was also a member of The Michigan Wolverines Basketball Team, where I participated in three NCAA Final Fours, and earned an NCAA Championship Title. I mention these things, not to tout my own accomplishments, but rather ...


Doug Kahn: Class Master, Dennis E. Ross 2016 University of Michigan Law School

Doug Kahn: Class Master, Dennis E. Ross

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

Doug has always been a bit of a departure from the professorial norm. Teaching for Doug was no accommodation to the job, no activity collateral to his true ambition, but rather an openly genuine attempt to engage his students and pull them into a subject that he obviously loved. His evident joy when in front of a class closed any distance with his students, no small feat considering the subject matter. Tax is forbidding territory for many, and Doug was justifiably known for his refusal to dumb the material down. Thus, much of his class may have been there reluctantly ...


Doug Kahn - A Personal Appreciation, Patricia D. White 2016 University of Miami School of Law

Doug Kahn - A Personal Appreciation, Patricia D. White

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

Doug Kahn has a booming laugh and an infectious enthusiasm for his subject. I am one of the legions of students who were infected by the tax bug—thanks to Doug. It is appropriate that, on the occasion of his retirement, some of us who were most infected reflect on Doug’s influence in our lives. In my case this is easy. I owe the basic contours of my career to Doug. I graduated from Michigan Law in 1974. Times were different then. I graduated never having had a female instructor. There were no women on the faculty. Only thirteen ...


Book Review: International Tax Planning. By Barry Spitz. London, England: Butterworth & Co. Ltd., 1972. Pp. Xxiii, 159. $12.15 (U.S.)., Donald O. Clark 2016 McClain, Mellen, Bowling & Hickman

Book Review: International Tax Planning. By Barry Spitz. London, England: Butterworth & Co. Ltd., 1972. Pp. Xxiii, 159. $12.15 (U.S.)., Donald O. Clark

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro 2016 NYU School of Law

The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

The last thirty years have witnessed rising income and wealth concentration among the top 0.1 percent of the population, leading to intense political debate regarding how, if at all, policymakers should respond. Often, this debate emphasizes the tools of public economics, and in particular optimal income taxation. However, while these tools can help us in evaluating the issues raised by high-end inequality, their extreme reductionism – which, in other settings, often offers significant analytic payoffs – here proves to have serious drawbacks. This paper addresses what we do and don’t learn from the optimal income tax literature regarding high-end inequality ...


The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro 2016 NYU School of Law

The Mapmaker's Dilemma In Evaluating High-End Inequality, Daniel Shaviro

New York University Law and Economics Working Papers

The last thirty years have witnessed rising income and wealth concentration among the top 0.1 percent of the population, leading to intense political debate regarding how, if at all, policymakers should respond. Often, this debate emphasizes the tools of public economics, and in particular optimal income taxation. However, while these tools can help us in evaluating the issues raised by high-end inequality, their extreme reductionism – which, in other settings, often offers significant analytic payoffs – here proves to have serious drawbacks. This paper addresses what we do and don’t learn from the optimal income tax literature regarding high-end inequality ...


Replacing Havoc: Creating Rules For Sovereign Default, Edward J. Kelley 2016 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Replacing Havoc: Creating Rules For Sovereign Default, Edward J. Kelley

Cleveland State Law Review

Sovereign debt is an ongoing threat to a State’s economic stability and its citizens’ standard of living. A single occurrence of default begins a cycle in which it becomes increasingly more difficult for an indebted State to pay its debts and ensure the survival of its citizens. Because central banking systems and direct spending are often inadequate methods to boost an indebted State’s economy, a more expansive solution to sovereign debt is required. The initial solution to the growing problem of sovereign debt is an international treaty that will allow the world economy to establish monitoring mechanisms to ...


The Pro Bono Collaborative: Celebrating 10 Years Of Pro Bono Partnerships, Roger Williams University School of Law 2016 Roger Williams University

The Pro Bono Collaborative: Celebrating 10 Years Of Pro Bono Partnerships, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Pro Bono Collaborative Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


Considering Alternatives: Are There Methods Other Than The Estate And Gift Tax That Could Better Address Problems Associated With Wealth Concentration?, Ray D. Madoff 2016 Boston College Law School

Considering Alternatives: Are There Methods Other Than The Estate And Gift Tax That Could Better Address Problems Associated With Wealth Concentration?, Ray D. Madoff

Boston College Law Review

This Commentary analyzes three articles generated from the Symposium “The Centennial of the Estate and Gift Tax: Perspectives and Recommendations,” held on October 2, 2015 at Boston College Law School. This Commentary explores the underlying purpose of the estate and gift tax: eliminating wealth inequality. It then considers the three articles’ proposed alternative tax systems—namely an accession tax and a wealth tax—that could more adequately address the problem of wealth concentration, and evaluates the merits of each.


Taxing Losers, Eric D. Chason 2016 William & Mary Law School

Taxing Losers, Eric D. Chason

Faculty Publications

The U.S. tax system, like most in the world, benefits capital gains in two ways. Investors can defer paying tax until they "realize" any gain (typically by sale) rather than when the gain simply occurs via rising prices. Additionally, individual investors pay a lower, preferred rate on their long-term capital gains as compared to their other ordinary income (such as compensation or business profits).

However, investors face a burden with respect to their capital losses. Rather than allowing for unlimited capital loss deductions, the Code largely forces investors to match their capital losses against their capital gains. Limits on ...


Deep Dive, Chicago Style: A Roadmap For Understanding International Tax Reform, Michael J. Veneri Jr. 2016 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Deep Dive, Chicago Style: A Roadmap For Understanding International Tax Reform, Michael J. Veneri Jr.

The Global Business Law Review

This note discusses the potential alternatives for international tax reform and evaluates them based upon the Chicago school of economic theory principles and the ability to eliminate "tax plays." The United States could modify the existing international taxation system with (1) the 2015 Obama Administration proposals, (2) a modified territorial system as proposed by Rep. Dave Camp, (3) a credit system with source-of-income rules without the deferral privilege, or (4) formulary apportionment system based on either a single-factor or a three-factor system. By eliminating a U.S. multinational corporation's ability to participate in "tax plays," inefficient rent-seeking behavior can ...


Comptroller Of The Treasury V. Wynne: Bridging The Gap Between Strands Of Jurisprudence On State Income Taxation, Daniel Bosworth 2016 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Comptroller Of The Treasury V. Wynne: Bridging The Gap Between Strands Of Jurisprudence On State Income Taxation, Daniel Bosworth

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


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