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Truth And Reconciliation: The Ku Klux Klan Hearings Of 1871 And The Genesis Of Section 1983, Tiffany R. Wright, Ciarra N. Carr, Jade W.P. Gasek 2022 Penn State Dickinson Law

Truth And Reconciliation: The Ku Klux Klan Hearings Of 1871 And The Genesis Of Section 1983, Tiffany R. Wright, Ciarra N. Carr, Jade W.P. Gasek

Dickinson Law Review

Over the course of seven months in 1871, Congress did something extraordinary for the time: It listened to Black people. At hearings in Washington, D.C. and throughout the former Confederate states, Black women and men—who just six years earlier were enslaved and barred from testifying in Southern courts—appeared before Congress to tell their stories. The stories were heartbreaking. After experiencing the joy of Emancipation and the initial hope of Reconstruction, they had been subjected to unspeakable horror at the hands of white terrorists. They had been raped and sexually humiliated. Their children and spouses murdered. They had ...


How In The World Could They Reach That Conclusion?, Carlton Reeves 2022 Penn State Dickinson Law

How In The World Could They Reach That Conclusion?, Carlton Reeves

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Bringing History Home: Strategies For The International Repatriation Of Native American Cultural Property, Alec Johnson 2022 Penn State Dickinson Law

Bringing History Home: Strategies For The International Repatriation Of Native American Cultural Property, Alec Johnson

Dickinson Law Review

The theft of Native American cultural items has been ongoing since Europeans began to colonize the Americas. As a result, millions of Native American artifacts are now located outside the borders of the United States. Native American tribes have long sought international repatriation—the return of these cultural objects to their tribal owners. Unfortunately, many countries have been unsupportive of repatriation attempts and Native Americans seeking the return of their cultural items face nearly insurmountable barriers in foreign courts. The U.S. government has a moral imperative to assist Native American tribes in these repatriation efforts. The debate over repatriation ...


Judicial Consensus: Why The Supreme Court Should Decide Its Cases Unanimously, David Orentlicher 2022 University of Connecticut

Judicial Consensus: Why The Supreme Court Should Decide Its Cases Unanimously, David Orentlicher

Connecticut Law Review

Like Congress and other deliberative bodies, the Supreme Court decides its cases by majority vote. If at least five of the nine Justices come to an agreement, their view prevails. But why is that the case? Majority voting for the Court is not spelled out in the Constitution, a federal statute, or Supreme Court rules.

Nor it is obvious that the Court should decide by a majority vote. When the public votes on a ballot measure, it typically makes sense to follow the majority. The general will of the electorate ought to govern. But judicial decisions are not supposed to ...


Compelled Speech And The Regulatory State, Alan K. Chen 2022 University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Compelled Speech And The Regulatory State, Alan K. Chen

Indiana Law Journal

Since the Supreme Court’s 1943 decision in West Virginia Board of Education v. Barnette, it has been axiomatic that the First Amendment prohibits the government not only from censoring speech, but also from compelling it. The central holding of Barnette itself is largely uncontroversial—it seems obvious that the First Amendment’s free speech clause means that no government may require people to espouse or reproduce an ideological statement against their will. But the Court has extended the compelled speech doctrine to stop the government from forcing people to make even truthful, factual statements. These claims have resulted in ...


Tort Law Implications Of Compelled Physician Speech, Nadia N. Sawicki 2022 Loyola University Chicago, School of Law

Tort Law Implications Of Compelled Physician Speech, Nadia N. Sawicki

Indiana Law Journal

Abortion-specific informed consent laws in many states compel physicians to communicate state-mandated information that is arguably inaccurate, immaterial, and inconsistent with their professional obligations. These laws face ongoing First Amendment challenges as violations of the constitutional right against compelled speech. This Article argues that laws compelling physician speech also pose significant problems that should concern scholars of tort law.

State laws that impose tort liability on physicians who refuse to communicate a state-mandated message often do so by deviating from foundational principles of tort law. Not only do they change the substantive disclosure duties of physicians under informed consent law ...


The Pledge Of Allegiance And Compelled Speech Revisited: Requiring Parental Consent, Caroline Mala Corbin 2022 University of Miami School of Law

The Pledge Of Allegiance And Compelled Speech Revisited: Requiring Parental Consent, Caroline Mala Corbin

Indiana Law Journal

Since the Supreme Court decided West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette in 1943, free speech law has been clear: public schools may not force students to recite the Pledge of Allegiance. Nevertheless, in two states—Texas and Florida— students may decline to participate only with parental permission. The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the law on the grounds that the parental requirement furthered parents’ substantive due process right to control the upbringing of their children.

The Eleventh Circuit decision is flawed both in its understanding of the First Amendment right to be free of compelled speech and ...


Compelled Disclosure And The Workplace Rights It Enables, Catherine Fisk 2022 Berkeley Law

Compelled Disclosure And The Workplace Rights It Enables, Catherine Fisk

Indiana Law Journal

Worker and consumer protection laws often rely on the regulated entity to notify workers or consumers of their legal rights because it is effective and efficient to provide information at the time and place where it is most likely to be useful. Until the Supreme Court ruled in NIFLA v. Becerra in 2018 that a California law regulating crisis pregnancy centers was an unconstitutional speaker-based, contentdiscriminatory regulation of speech, mandatory disclosure laws were constitutionally uncontroversial economic regulation. Yet, the day after striking down a disclosure law in NIFLA, the Court in Janus v. AFSCME Council 31 expanded the right of ...


Rwu Law News: The Newsletter Of Roger Williams University School Of Law, Michael M. Bowden, Gregory W. Bowman, Brooklyn Crockton 2022 Roger Williams University School of Law

Rwu Law News: The Newsletter Of Roger Williams University School Of Law, Michael M. Bowden, Gregory W. Bowman, Brooklyn Crockton

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


The Restitution Of Nazi-Looted Art In The United States: A Legal And Policy Analysis, Katharine J. Namon 2022 Trinity College, Hartford Connecticut

The Restitution Of Nazi-Looted Art In The United States: A Legal And Policy Analysis, Katharine J. Namon

Senior Theses and Projects

Restitution of Nazi-looted art in the United States is a complicated legal and policy issue. Victims and their heirs seeking restitution of their stolen art frequently encounter inconsistent legal standards at the state, federal, and international levels. Moreover, there are many different parties involved in these cases, including countries, museums, private collections, auction houses, heirs, and individuals who may have an interest in the particular work of art. Ethics must also be considered, and in the past, international principles for nations have been established to guide the process of delivering victims of wartime looting justice. Unfortunately, the current legal framework ...


“Hey Stephen”, Leah M. Litman 2022 University of Michigan Law School

“Hey Stephen”, Leah M. Litman

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Authority of the Court and the Peril of Politics. By Stephen Breyer.


The Never-Ending Struggle For Reproductive Rights, Stephanie Toti 2022 Lawyering Project

The Never-Ending Struggle For Reproductive Rights, Stephanie Toti

Michigan Law Review

For me, the annual Book Review issue is a time for reflection. It provides an opportunity to take stock of scholarly trends, reassess conventional wisdom, and gather new insights to apply to the practice of law. The reviews contained in this year’s issue address a wide range of subjects, including the history of public defenders, the use of bigotry rhetoric in conflicts over marriage and civil rights law, the role of cost-benefit analysis in federal policymaking, and racial inequities in tax policy. This impressive commentary on an astute and varied collection of books about the law will inspire many ...


Repairing A Fractured America, Nathaniel Lewis Tucker 2022 Liberty University

Repairing A Fractured America, Nathaniel Lewis Tucker

Helm's School of Government Conference

America is fractured beyond repair. The fracture itself has been caused by a foundational deficiency at the core of American government. That deficiency can only be described as a humanistic and rationalistic rebellion against God’s Word in the erecting of the American Federal Government. To correct this problem, the founding documents must be revised for their deficiencies. However, the great question is, by what standard will the founding documents be revised? It is thus proposed there can be no better standard for the American government than the perfect Law of Liberty revealed in the Scriptures of the Old and ...


"The Right To Protest For Right": Reaffirming The First Amendment Principle That Limits The Tort Liability Of Protest Organizers, Allison R. Ferraris 2022 Boston College Law School

"The Right To Protest For Right": Reaffirming The First Amendment Principle That Limits The Tort Liability Of Protest Organizers, Allison R. Ferraris

Boston College Law Review

On December 16, 2019, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit held in Doe v. Mckesson that a court could hold DeRay Mckesson liable for damages to a police officer whom an unidentified assailant injured at a 2016 Black Lives Matter protest that Mckesson helped organize. Mckesson did not cause the officer’s injuries, and he did not order, encourage, or incite the protestors at the demonstration to act violently. The Fifth Circuit held that Mckesson could be liable only because he played a role in organizing the demonstration. In 1982, the U.S. Supreme Court set ...


Health Choice Or Health Coercion? The Osha Emergency Temporary Standard Covid-19 Vaccination Mandates: Ax Or Vax, Savannah Snyder 2022 Liberty University

Health Choice Or Health Coercion? The Osha Emergency Temporary Standard Covid-19 Vaccination Mandates: Ax Or Vax, Savannah Snyder

Helm's School of Government Conference

No abstract provided.


National Scenic Trails, Pipelines, & Ferc: Examining Pipeline Certification After United States Forest Service V. Cowpasture River Forest Preservation Association, Caitlin M. Doak 2022 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

National Scenic Trails, Pipelines, & Ferc: Examining Pipeline Certification After United States Forest Service V. Cowpasture River Forest Preservation Association, Caitlin M. Doak

Villanova Environmental Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Commentary: The Workplace Vaccine Decision And Its Implications For Federal Regulatory Power, John M. Greabe 2022 University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law

Commentary: The Workplace Vaccine Decision And Its Implications For Federal Regulatory Power, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

[Excerpt] "In a recent commentary, I contrasted the pragmatic consequentialism of retiring Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer – and, more generally, the other two members of the court’s liberal bloc (Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan) – with the structural formalism of the court’s six-justice conservative supermajority. I also suggested that this framework may provide a more useful way to understand many of the court’s recent and upcoming blockbuster decisions than the partisan angle that court watchers so frequently use."


The Third Annual Women In Law Leadership Lecture: A Fireside Chat Featuring Amy Barasch, Esq., Roger Williams University School of Law 2022 Roger Williams University

The Third Annual Women In Law Leadership Lecture: A Fireside Chat Featuring Amy Barasch, Esq., Roger Williams University School Of Law

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Law School News: 'Why I Know Anti-Blackness Doesn't Define Ketanji Brown Jackson' 03-22-2022, Brooklyn Crockton 2022 Roger Williams University School of Law

Law School News: 'Why I Know Anti-Blackness Doesn't Define Ketanji Brown Jackson' 03-22-2022, Brooklyn Crockton

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Law School News: Meet The Rbg Essay Contest Winners! 03-22-2022, Michael M. Bowden 2022 Roger Williams University School of Law

Law School News: Meet The Rbg Essay Contest Winners! 03-22-2022, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


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