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Social Welfare Law Commons

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Changing Welfare As We Know It, Again: Reforming The Welfare Reform Act To Provide All Drug Felons Access To Food Stamps, Meghan Looney Paresky 2017 Boston College Law School

Changing Welfare As We Know It, Again: Reforming The Welfare Reform Act To Provide All Drug Felons Access To Food Stamps, Meghan Looney Paresky

Boston College Law Review

Approximately half a million Americans are currently incarcerated for drug convictions at the state and federal level. President Clinton’s 1996 enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (“PRWORA”) affects this enormous class of individuals by including a provision that places a lifetime ban on access to welfare benefits, including food stamps, for individuals who have been convicted of a drug felony. Although there is an option within PRWORA for states to modify or opt out of the provision, six states and territories still enforce the full lifetime ban, and most states have some form of the ...


Putting Distribution First, Robert C. Hockett 2017 Cornell Law School

Putting Distribution First, Robert C. Hockett

Robert C. Hockett

It is common for normative legal theorists, economists and other policy analysts to conduct and communicate their work mainly in maximizing terms. They take the maximization of welfare, for example, or of wealth or utility, to be primary objectives of legislation and public policy. Few if any of these theorists seem to notice, however, that any time we speak explicitly of maximizing one thing, we speak implicitly of distributing other things and of equalizing yet other things. Fewer still seem to recognize that we effectively define ourselves by reference to that which we distribute and equalize. For it is in ...


Defend The Rights Of The Poor, Gordon J. Beggs 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Defend The Rights Of The Poor, Gordon J. Beggs

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Surrogate Lawyering: Legal Guidance, Sans Lawyers, Paul R Tremblay 2017 Boston College Law School

Surrogate Lawyering: Legal Guidance, Sans Lawyers, Paul R Tremblay

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Innovative thinkers within the access-to-justice (ATJ) movement have been experimenting with creative ideas for delivering meaningful legal guidance in an efficient way to clients struggling with civil legal needs. These efforts respond to the long-standing crisis in the delivery of legal services to disadvantaged persons, and the overwhelming need for legal advice in areas such as debt collection, housing, family, and immigration. One such imaginative proposal is what this Article calls “surrogate lawyering.” This innovation envisions public interest law firms using some scarce lawyer time to train and advise community-based organization (CBO) staff members to respond, in real time and ...


Looking At Justice Through A Lens Of Healing And Reconnection, Annalise Buth, Lynn Cohn 2017 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Looking At Justice Through A Lens Of Healing And Reconnection, Annalise Buth, Lynn Cohn

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


“I Am Undocumented And A New Yorker”: Affirmative City Citizenship And New York City’S Idnyc Program, Amy C. Torres 2017 Fordham University School of Law

“I Am Undocumented And A New Yorker”: Affirmative City Citizenship And New York City’S Idnyc Program, Amy C. Torres

Fordham Law Review

The power to confer legal citizenship status is possessed solely by the federal government. Yet the courts and legal theorists have demonstrated that citizenship encompasses factors beyond legal status, including rights, inclusion, and political participation. As a result, even legal citizens can face barriers to citizenship, broadly understood, due to factors including their race, class, gender, or disability. Given this multidimensionality, the city, as the place where residents carry out the tasks of their daily lives, is a critical space for promoting elements of citizenship. This Note argues that recent city municipal identification-card programs have created a new form of ...


Antitrust Policy And Inequality Of Wealth, Herbert J. Hovenkamp 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Antitrust Policy And Inequality Of Wealth, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship

Why would anyone want to use antitrust law as a wealth distribution device when far more explicit statutory tools are available for that purpose? One feature of antitrust is its open-textured, nonspecific statutes that are interpreted by judges. As a result, using antitrust to redistribute wealth may be a way of invoking the judicial process without having to go to Congress or a state legislature that is likely to be unsympathetic. Of course, a corollary is that someone attempting to use antitrust law to redistribute wealth will have to rely on the existing antitrust statutes rather than obtaining a new ...


The Economic Justice Imperative For Transactional Law Clinics, Lynnise E. Pantin 2017 Boston College Law School

The Economic Justice Imperative For Transactional Law Clinics, Lynnise E. Pantin

Lynnise E. Pantin

The economic, political, and social volatility of the sixties and seventies, out of which clinical legal education was born, has certain mythical qualities for most law students, and perhaps some law professors. America still bears the scars of the economic policies of those previous eras, such as redlining, blockbusting, poverty and urban decay. While the realities of the era may seem out of reach for many of our students, those policies arising out of that era have contributed to the wealth gap in this country, which has worsened over the last twenty years. Now more than ever, society needs social ...


Recognizing Challenges And Opportunities In The Quest To End Hunger, Jennifer Williams Zwagerman 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Recognizing Challenges And Opportunities In The Quest To End Hunger, Jennifer Williams Zwagerman

Texas A&M Law Review

As an attorney and professor that does not focus on intellectual property law, I was a bit apprehensive about providing a keynote address for a Symposium focusing on “Agriculture, Intellectual Property, and Feeding the World in the 21st Century.” As I thought about this topic, knowing that there were other speakers who would focus more on the IP issues and technical aspects of various topics, I kept coming back to the importance of technology as we worktowards the goal of feeding the world, and the many ways in which innovation plays a role in meeting that goal. It also brought ...


The Untold Story Of The Justice Gap: Integrating Poverty Law Into The Law School Curriculum, Vanita S. Snow 2017 University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law

The Untold Story Of The Justice Gap: Integrating Poverty Law Into The Law School Curriculum, Vanita S. Snow

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Triple-C Impact: Responding To Childhood Exposure To Crime And Violence, Michal Gilad 2017 University of Pennsylvania

The Triple-C Impact: Responding To Childhood Exposure To Crime And Violence, Michal Gilad

Faculty Scholarship

The article is the first to take an inclusive look at the monumental problem of crime exposure during childhood, which is estimated to be one of the most damaging and costly public health and public safety problem in our society today. It takes-on the challenging task of ‘naming’ the problem by coining the term Comprehensive Childhood Crime Impact or in short the Triple-C Impact. Informed by scientific findings, the term embodies the full effect of direct and indirect crime exposure on children due to their unique developmental characteristics, and the spillover effect the problem has on our society as a ...


The Changing View Of The “Bystander” In Holocaust Scholarship: Historical, Ethical, And Political Implications, Victoria J. Barnett 2017 Director of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust

The Changing View Of The “Bystander” In Holocaust Scholarship: Historical, Ethical, And Political Implications, Victoria J. Barnett

Utah Law Review

The role of “bystanders” has been a central theme in discussions about the ethical legacy of the Holocaust. In early Holocaust historiography, “bystander” was often used as a generalized catchall term designating passivity toward Nazi crimes. “Bystander behavior” became synonymous with passivity to the plight of others, including the failure to speak out against injustice and/or assist its victims. More recent scholarship has documented the extent to which local populations and institutions were actively complicit in Nazi crimes, participating in and benefitting from the persecution of Jewish citizens, not only in Germany but across Europe. This newer research has ...


A Cautionary Tale, David Schwendiman 2017 Specialist (Chief) Prosecutor of the Kosovo Specialist Prosecutor’s Office in The Hague, The Netherlands

A Cautionary Tale, David Schwendiman

Utah Law Review

It is imperative when talking about accountability and the enforcement of internationally recognized and accepted criminal norms governing conflict, when talking about investigating and prosecuting atrocity crime, not to raise expectations that have little or no chance of being met. Expanding the modes of liability to reach bystanders has the potential to raise such expectations, pushing the range of subjects that victims, survivors and others with an interest in the outcome of atrocity crime investigations and prosecutions expect will be prosecuted out beyond those as to whom there is likely to be political will to prosecute and certainly beyond the ...


The Bystander During The Holocaust, Robert A. Goldberg 2017 Professor of History and Director of the Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah

The Bystander During The Holocaust, Robert A. Goldberg

Utah Law Review

The German people today have embraced their sense of collective responsibility. They have accepted the seamless case of genocide and its implications are part of the national soul. They have come to full reckoning, determined to remember a difficult past and not repeat it. The Austrians, the Dutch, and the Poles have yet to reach the point of confession or even an awareness of responsibility. Perhaps the most remarkable symbol of national responsibility is the grassroots Stolperstein or Stumble Stone project, which began in Germany in 1992 with the goal to remember the victims of the Holocaust individually. Cobblestone-size concrete ...


The Bystander In The Bible, The Reverend Doctor John C. Lenz Jr. 2017 Pastor of Forest Hill Church Presbyterian in Cleveland Heights, Ohio

The Bystander In The Bible, The Reverend Doctor John C. Lenz Jr.

Utah Law Review

In this study I have set out to investigate the stories that Jews and Christians have told for over two thousand years. Surveying the Biblical literature, I have looked for verses, passages and stories related to the issue of the bystander’s duty to act on behalf of the victim. The issue of a person’s duty to help someone in need and to be proactively engaged on behalf of the most vulnerable is everywhere present in both the Hebrew and Christian scriptures. The Biblical proscriptions are not just suggestions to “do the right thing” but divine ethical demands to ...


Unbefriended And Unrepresented: Better Medical Decision Making For Incapacitated Patients Without Healthcare Surrogates, Thaddeus Mason Pope 2017 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Unbefriended And Unrepresented: Better Medical Decision Making For Incapacitated Patients Without Healthcare Surrogates, Thaddeus Mason Pope

Georgia State University Law Review

The purpose of this Article is to help improve the quality of healthcare decision making for the unbefriended. I hope that this comprehensive and systematic explanation of both the problem and the available solutions will empower both public and clinical policymakers to develop more informed and more circumspect policies and procedures


The Government’S Role In Unleashing Impact Investing’S Full Potential, Chelsea McGrath 2017 Pepperdine University

The Government’S Role In Unleashing Impact Investing’S Full Potential, Chelsea Mcgrath

Pepperdine Law Review

Impact investing refers to investments made in organizations, companies, or funds with the intent to generate measurable social or environmental impact along with a financial return. Since its start in 2008, this industry has become a vibrant tool to address a wide variety of local and global issues, resulting in higher standards of living, lower rates of prison recidivism, clean technology and more. Impact investing is no longer a novel concept. Rather, it has successfully pushed the boundaries from the separate methods of conventional investing and philanthropy, blending them together to create sustainable solutions to social and environmental problems. By ...


Self-Help, Reimagined, J. David Griener, Dalie Jimenez, Lois Lupica 2017 Harvard Law School

Self-Help, Reimagined, J. David Griener, Dalie Jimenez, Lois Lupica

Indiana Law Journal

We will never have enough lawyers to serve the civil legal needs of all low- and moderate-income (LMI) individuals who must navigate civil legal problems. A significant part of the access-to-justice toolkit must include self-help materials. That much is not new; indeed, the legal aid community has been actively developing pro se guides and forms for decades. But the community has hamstrung its creations in two major ways: first, by focusing these materials almost exclusively on educating LMI individuals about formal law, and second, by considering the task complete once the materials have been made available to self-represented individuals. In ...


Criminalizing Pregnancy, Cortney Lollar 2017 University of Kentucky

Criminalizing Pregnancy, Cortney Lollar

Indiana Law Journal

The state of Tennessee arrested a woman two days after she gave birth and charged her with assault of her newborn child based on her use of narcotics during her preg-nancy. Tennessee’s 2014 assault statute was the first to explicitly criminalize the use of drugs by a pregnant woman. But this law, along with others like it being considered by legislatures across the country, is only the most recent manifestation of a long history of using criminal law to punish poor mothers and mothers of color for their behavior while pregnant. The purported motivation for such laws is the ...


Networked Medical Devices: Finding A Legislative Solution To Guide Healthcare Into The Future, Louiza Dudin 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Networked Medical Devices: Finding A Legislative Solution To Guide Healthcare Into The Future, Louiza Dudin

Seattle University Law Review

This article discusses: (I) the current legal approaches to addressing cybersecurity in general, (II) the shortcomings of current legal approaches, (III) a proposal for legislation to narrow the scope of the Medical Device Amendments (MDA) preemption clause, and (IV) the benefits and shortcomings of the proposed legislation.


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