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300 Years Of Copyright Law? A Not So Modest Proposal For Reform, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 1 (2010), James GH Griffin 2010 John Marshall Law School

300 Years Of Copyright Law? A Not So Modest Proposal For Reform, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 1 (2010), James Gh Griffin

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

2010 sees the three hundredth anniversary of the U.K.'s Statute of Anne 1710. This paper suggests that with the increased ability of content recipients to re-use works, there is a need to readdress the concerns of stakeholders, namely authors, publishers and content recipients. The paper sets out in detail how this should be achieved. To do so, it utilises the notion of creativity as the benchmark by which to balance the interests of stakeholders. This has been used in early eighteenth century case law in the U.K., and there are also other historical and theoretical justifications. The ...


The Olympic Meddle: The International Olympic Committee's Intrusion Of Athletes' Privacy Through The Discriminatory Practice Of Gender Verification Testing, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 49 (2010), Raheel Saleem 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Olympic Meddle: The International Olympic Committee's Intrusion Of Athletes' Privacy Through The Discriminatory Practice Of Gender Verification Testing, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 49 (2010), Raheel Saleem

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The IOC and the IAAF act as governing bodies for athletes and, therefore, are innately responsible for their actions. However, the gender verification rule exemplifies that irresponsible actions by these governing agencies adversely effects its athletes. The gender verification rule empowers both the IOC and the IAAF to make life-changing decisions without any restriction, leaving athletes susceptible to the unfettered power and abuse of the rule. The legal foundation established by the international human rights declarations support the argument that gender verification testing must be abolished because of its embedded discrimination and intrusive nature. An application of the ICCPR provides ...


Firearm Transaction Disclosure In The Digital Age: Should The Government Know What Is In Your Home?, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 497 (2010), Elaine Vullmahn 2010 John Marshall Law School

Firearm Transaction Disclosure In The Digital Age: Should The Government Know What Is In Your Home?, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 497 (2010), Elaine Vullmahn

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This comment examines the primary arguments for continuing to prohibit the federal government from establishing a federal firearm registry. The Background section of this comment surveys the development of laws restricting firearm sales and requiring federal firearm licensed dealers to maintain pertinent records. This section also describes how, if enacted, the Blair Holt’s Firearm Licensing and Registration Act of 2009, known as H.R. 45, would, through the creation of federal firearm registry, expose electronic records of private citizens’ firearm purchases and ownership to possible government abuse. The Analysis section examines why H.R. 45 is not the correct ...


The Cathedral And The Bizarre: An Examination Of The "Viral" Aspects Of The Gpl, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 349 (2010), Michael F. Morgan 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Cathedral And The Bizarre: An Examination Of The "Viral" Aspects Of The Gpl, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 349 (2010), Michael F. Morgan

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

While there is a growing body of literature dealing with the General Public License (“GPL”), the potential viral effects of the GPL do not appear to have been analyzed in a detailed technical manner. This paper will attempt to demonstrate that a proper legal analysis of the viral effects of the GPL is dependent on a detailed technical understanding of the specific mechanisms used for each type of program-to-program interaction. Once these technical mechanisms are properly understood it will then be possible to identify the applicable copyright law needed to assess the viral effects of the GPL.


Law School & The Web Of Group Affiliation: Socializing, Socialization, And Social Network Site Use Among Law Students, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2010), Eric M. Fink 2010 John Marshall Law School

Law School & The Web Of Group Affiliation: Socializing, Socialization, And Social Network Site Use Among Law Students, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2010), Eric M. Fink

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Online social network sites (“SNS”) have emerged as a significant socio-technical phenomenon in the past several years. Scholars from various disciplines have examined these sites to develop a better understanding of their social significance and implications from a variety of perspectives. Within the burgeoning field of SNS studies, one strand of work focuses on the place of SNSs in students’ educational experiences and the potential pedagogical applications of SNSs. However, the SNS phenomenon generally, and its educational/pedagogical significance in particular, have received scant attention from legal scholars. This article examines the place of SNSs within the contemporary law school ...


Cyberwar Policy, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 303 (2010), Matthew Borton, Samuel Liles, Sydney Liles 2010 John Marshall Law School

Cyberwar Policy, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 303 (2010), Matthew Borton, Samuel Liles, Sydney Liles

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Cyberwarfare is a very real threat to the security of the nation. Yet there is confusion and disagreement as to which government body is most appropriate to assume the cyberwar mission. The Strategy to Secure Cyberspace treats the threat primarily as a criminal issue, and assigns responsibility to the Department of Homeland Security. The National Defense Strategy implies that cyberwarfare is a military issue. Both documents may be correct, depending on the case. The cyberspace terrain transcends boundaries, quickly blurring the line between civil or criminal action and an act of war, leaving the government with the issue of assigning ...


Interpretation & The Internet, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 251 (2010), Cameron Hutchison 2010 John Marshall Law School

Interpretation & The Internet, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 251 (2010), Cameron Hutchison

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Twenty years after the advent of the Internet, the revolutionary nature of the technology can no longer be in doubt. In spite of the ‘differentness” of the Internet, courts have proven adept at adapting extant law to the features and demands of this new technology. This paper will chronicle the differences between the Internet and other technologies which might, depending on the legal issue, justify the exclusion of the Internet from established rules on the basis of analogical reasoning. Two approaches to legal interpretation – literalism and purposivism—will be discussed in light of this new technology, with an explanation as ...


Internet Filtering: The Ineffectiveness Of Wto Remedies And The Availability Of Alternative Tort Remedies, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 273 (2010), Kristen A. Knapp 2010 John Marshall Law School

Internet Filtering: The Ineffectiveness Of Wto Remedies And The Availability Of Alternative Tort Remedies, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 273 (2010), Kristen A. Knapp

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Empirical studies have shown that government Internet filtering is increasing worldwide. Internet Service Providers have progressively begun to take on filtering responsibility in a quasi-governmental capacity. As filtering has increased, some have begun to question whether Internet filtering might violate WTO commitments under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (“GATS Agreement”). This paper will provide technical background on how Internet filtering is accomplished in practice, and explain the GATS Agreement that was held to govern Internet filtering in the U.S.-Gambling Services decision. This paper will further survey the current range of U.S. filtering actions and detail ...


Safeguarding "The Precious": Counsel On Law Journal Publication Agreements In Digital Times, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 217 (2010), Michael N. Widener 2010 John Marshall Law School

Safeguarding "The Precious": Counsel On Law Journal Publication Agreements In Digital Times, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 217 (2010), Michael N. Widener

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Heaping scholarship fills the academic print and online press about where legal scholars should publish and how to have one’s paper accepted for publication. But there is scarce writing about the contractual relationship between the law journal and the author of an accepted paper. This may be due in part to broadly misconstrued or ignored publication agrees, or perhaps that the business relationship is unworthy of scholarly attention. Regardless, this paper introduces a pragmatist’s perspective on evaluating and revising publication agreements, and informs student editors how publication agreements accomplish a journal’s objectives, based on current copyright law ...


Protecting Consumers From Spyware: A Proposed Consumer Digital Trespass Act, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 185 (2010), Richard G. Kunkel 2010 John Marshall Law School

Protecting Consumers From Spyware: A Proposed Consumer Digital Trespass Act, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 185 (2010), Richard G. Kunkel

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

“Spyware” is a broad term used to describe software that resides on a user’s computer and monitors the user’s online behavior. Though spyware may be helpful or benign, it can also be used for malicious purposes, commonly classified as “malware”. Consumers, who lack sophistication to avoid unintentionally downloading spyware, are especially vulnerable to the threat of malware. In lieu of this threat, it is important to understand the nature and scope of spyware problems affecting consumers. The paper will discuss how common law tort theories of trespass and trespass to chattel are difficult to apply to spyware, and ...


The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Petitioner, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 119 (2010), Kelly Foss, Vince Lombardozzi, Jared Palmer 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Petitioner, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 119 (2010), Kelly Foss, Vince Lombardozzi, Jared Palmer

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The circuit court erred when it granted summary judgment in favor of MarshCODE because Mr. Murphy has demonstrated facts to support the elements of the (1) defamation, (2) false light invasion of privacy, and (3) breach of contract claims. First, Mr. Murphy has provided facts to support the defamation claim. MarshCODE made a false and defamatory statement about Mr. Murphy when it told Ms. Who that he was her father. Because this matter concerns Mr. Murphy's private life, a negligence standard applies rather than the First Amendment's actual malice standard. Mr. Murphy has demonstrated that MarshCODE acted either ...


The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Respondent, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 151 (2010), Kimberly Hodgman, Jody Rodenberg, Erin Tyler 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Respondent, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 151 (2010), Kimberly Hodgman, Jody Rodenberg, Erin Tyler

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The First District Court of Appeals properly affirmed summary judgment on behalf of MarshCODE because Appellant failed to raise a genuine issue of material fact on his defamation claim. First, MarshCODE's accidental disclosure of information, which implied that Appellant participated in premarital sex or had a homosexual child, was not defamatory because an average person would not lower his estimation or be deterred from associating with Appellant based on such a statement. Second, no publication was made because MarshCODE did not act with negligence and was unaware of the program malfunction that resulted in the release of the information ...


Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye 2010 Pennsylvania State University, Dickinson School of Law

Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye

Michigan Law Review First Impressions

In August 2009, the Board of Trustees of the University of Akron added to the university's employment policy the following proviso: "any applicant may be asked to submit fingerprints or DNA sample for purpose of a federal criminal background check." Although the federal government does not do background checks with DNA, the policy is significant because it highlights a largely unexplored feature of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 ("GINA"). Hailed by the late Senator Edward Kennedy as "the first civil rights bill of the new century of life sciences," GINA generally prohibits employers from asking for "genetic ...


There Is A Time To Keep Silent And A Time To Speak, The Hard Part Is Knowing Which Is Which: Striking The Balance Between Privacy Protection And The Flow Of Health Care Information, Daniel J. Gilman, James C. Cooper 2010 Federal Trade Commission

There Is A Time To Keep Silent And A Time To Speak, The Hard Part Is Knowing Which Is Which: Striking The Balance Between Privacy Protection And The Flow Of Health Care Information, Daniel J. Gilman, James C. Cooper

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

Health information technology (HIT) has become a signal element of federal health policy, especially as the recently enacted American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act or ARRA) comprises numerous provisions related to HIT and commits tens of billions of dollars to its development and adoption. These provisions charge various agencies of the federal government with both general and specific HIT-related implementation tasks including, inter alia, providing funding for HIT in various contexts: the implementation of interoperable HIT, HIT-related infrastructure, and HIT-related training and research. The Recovery Act also contains various regulatory provisions pertaining to HIT. Provisions of the ...


Patchwork Protection: Copyright Law And Quilted Art, 9 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 855 (2010), Maureen Collins 2010 John Marshall Law School

Patchwork Protection: Copyright Law And Quilted Art, 9 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 855 (2010), Maureen Collins

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Historically, quilts have been denied the same copyright protection available to any other expression in a fixed medium. When quilts have been considered protectable, the protectable elements in a pattern have been limited, or the application of the substantial similarity test has varied widely. One possible explanation for this unequal treatment is that quilting is viewed as ‘women’s work.’ Another is that quilts are primarily functional. However, quilts have evolved over time and may now be expensive collectible pieces of art; art that deserves copyright protection. This article traces the history of quilt making, addresses the varying standards of ...


Technological Fair Use, Edward Lee 2010 IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

Technological Fair Use, Edward Lee

All Faculty Scholarship

The Article proposes a framework tailoring fair use specifically for technology cases. At the inception of the twenty-first century, information technologies have become increasingly central to the U.S. economy. Not surprisingly, complex copyright cases involving speech technologies, such as DVRs, mp3 devices, Google Book Search, and YouTube, have increased as well. Yet existing copyright law, developed long before digital technologies, is ill-prepared to handle the complexities these technology cases pose. The key question often turns, not on prima facie infringement, but on the defense of fair use, which courts have too often relegated to extremely fact-specific decisions. The downside ...


White Paper, The Emergence Of Knowledge Analysis: Change And Knowledge Management In Large Law Firms, Ronald W. Staudt 2010 IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

White Paper, The Emergence Of Knowledge Analysis: Change And Knowledge Management In Large Law Firms, Ronald W. Staudt

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Time And Place For "Technology-Shifting" Rights, Max Oppenheimer 2010 University of Baltimore School of Law

The Time And Place For "Technology-Shifting" Rights, Max Oppenheimer

All Faculty Scholarship

Intellectual property policy requires balance between the goal of motivating innovation and the need to prevent that motivation from stifling further innovation. The constitutional grant of congressional power to motivate innovation by securing "for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries" is qualified by the requirement that congressional enactments under the Intellectual Property Clause "promote progress."

The speed of technological change, particularly in the converging fields of computer software, music, video, television, and communications, coupled with the power of technology industry lobbying, have left the statutory balance tilted in favor of rewarding ...


Castles In The Air: F. Gregory Lastowka's Virtual Justice, Joshua A.T. Fairfield 2010 Washington & Lee University School of Law

Castles In The Air: F. Gregory Lastowka's Virtual Justice, Joshua A.T. Fairfield

Faculty Scholarship

This Article argues that informed consent to contract terms is not a good to be maximized, but an information cost that courts should minimize. As a result, courts ought to minimize the cost sum of information costs and contractual surprise. The Article applies information-cost theory to show that information-forcing rules are often inefficient at both the micro- and macroeconomic levels. Such rules also impose greater costs on third parties than the benefits they create for the contracting parties. When one consumer creates an idiosyncratic deal, the information-savings benefits of standardization are reduced for all other potential consumers. The Article demonstrates ...


The Nas Report: In Pursuit Of Justice, Geoffrey S. Mearns 2010 Fordham Law School

The Nas Report: In Pursuit Of Justice, Geoffrey S. Mearns

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article discusses the NSA report entitled “Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward.” It argues that law enforcement officials should embrace the recommendations in the NAS report. The Committee identified many of the systemic problems that plague forensic science, and the report identified thirteen specific recommendations to address these systemic problems.


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