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Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorder And Mental Illness In Criminal Offenders, Jayme M. Reisler 2015 University of Houston - Main

Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorder And Mental Illness In Criminal Offenders, Jayme M. Reisler

Jayme M Reisler

The high rate of comorbid substance use disorder and other mental illness (“dual diagnosis”) poses an enormous obstacle to public policy and sentencing in criminal cases. It is estimated that almost half of all Federal, State, and jail inmates suffer from dual diagnosis – a significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. Yet such inmates lack access to proper and effective treatments for their conditions. Several etiological theories have been put forth to explain the occurrence of dual diagnosis in general. However, virtually no studies have explored possible etiological reasons for the higher prevalence of dual diagnosis specifically in criminal ...


All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara G. Gordon 2015 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara G. Gordon

Scholarly Works

We ask juries to make important decisions that have a profound impact on people’s lives. We leave these decisions in the hands of groups of laypeople because we hope that the diverse range of experiences and knowledge in the group will lead to more thoughtful and informed decisionmaking. Studies suggest that diverse groups of jurors have different perspectives on evidence, engage in more thorough debate, and more closely evaluate facts. At the same time, there are a variety of problems associated with group decisionmaking, from the loss of individual motivation in group settings, to the vulnerability of groups to ...


Free Expression, In-Group Bias, And The Court's Conservatives: A Critique Of The Epstein-Parker-Segal Study, Todd E. Pettys 2015 University of Iowa College of Law

Free Expression, In-Group Bias, And The Court's Conservatives: A Critique Of The Epstein-Parker-Segal Study, Todd E. Pettys

Todd E. Pettys

In a recent, widely publicized study, a prestigious team of political scientists concluded that there is strong evidence of ideological in-group bias among the Supreme Court’s members in First Amendment free-expression cases, with the current four most conservative justices being the Roberts Court’s worst offenders. Beneath the surface of the authors’ conclusions, however, one finds a surprisingly sizable combination of coding errors, superficial case readings, and questionable judgments about litigants’ ideological affiliations. Many of those problems likely flow either from shortcomings that reportedly afflict the Supreme Court Database (the data set that nearly always provides the starting point ...


Would The Implementation Of The Un Crpd Help The Disabilities Enjoy Fair Human Rights In The Us?, Ashley H. Song Ms. 2015 University of Pennsylvania (2012)

Would The Implementation Of The Un Crpd Help The Disabilities Enjoy Fair Human Rights In The Us?, Ashley H. Song Ms.

Hyein Ashley Song Ms.

Modern discrimination is implicit. The paper finds out the implicit discrimination which comes from the mindset. So called, the ‘cognitive discrimination’ excludes the explicit discrimination prohibited by the legal language of the anti-discrimination law in the US. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) Article 12 states the fair recognition of disabilities. The paper tests if the UN CRPD can extend its meaning of fair recognition to reduce the hidden prejudice.


Lawyer, Form Thyself: Professional Identity Formation Strategies In Legal Education, Professional Responsibility, And Experiential Courses, Susan S. Daicoff 2014 Arizona Summit Law School

Lawyer, Form Thyself: Professional Identity Formation Strategies In Legal Education, Professional Responsibility, And Experiential Courses, Susan S. Daicoff

Susan Daicoff

Professional identity formation as a learning objective in law school may appear to be nontraditional and perhaps even innovative. While perhaps not a new concept, it is not typically an explicit goal of legal education. Empirical data finds that law school has demonstrable effects upon law students’ professional development; it also finds that certain nontraditional skills and competencies (or “soft skills”) make lawyers most effective. This article argues for explicit planning for and inclusion of professional identity development, including training in these nontraditional skills, in legal education. Professional identity encompasses one’s values, preferences, passions, intrinsic satisfactions, emotional intelligence, as ...


The Daryl Atkins Story, Mark E. Olive 2014 College of William & Mary Law School

The Daryl Atkins Story, Mark E. Olive

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Hall V. Florida: The Supreme Court’S Guidance In Implementing Atkins, James W. Ellis 2014 College of William & Mary Law School

Hall V. Florida: The Supreme Court’S Guidance In Implementing Atkins, James W. Ellis

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Scientizing Culpability: The Implications Of Hall V. Florida And The Possibility Of A “Scientific Stare Decisis”, Christopher Slobogin 2014 College of William & Mary Law School

Scientizing Culpability: The Implications Of Hall V. Florida And The Possibility Of A “Scientific Stare Decisis”, Christopher Slobogin

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

The Supreme Court’s decision in Hall v. Florida held that “clinical definitions” control the meaning of intellectual disability in the death penalty context. In other words, Hall “scientized” the definition of a legal concept. This Article discusses the implications of this unprecedented move. It also introduces the idea of scientific stare decisis—a requirement that groups that are scientifically alike be treated similarly for culpability purposes—as a means of implementing the scientization process.


Challenges Of Conveying Intellectual Disabilities To Judge And Jury, Caroline Everington 2014 College of William & Mary Law School

Challenges Of Conveying Intellectual Disabilities To Judge And Jury, Caroline Everington

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


The True Legacy Of Atkins And Roper: The Unreliability Principle, Mentally Ill Defendants, And The Death Penalty’S Unraveling, Scott E. Sundby 2014 College of William & Mary Law School

The True Legacy Of Atkins And Roper: The Unreliability Principle, Mentally Ill Defendants, And The Death Penalty’S Unraveling, Scott E. Sundby

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

In striking down the death penalty for intellectually disabled and juvenile defendants, Atkins v. Virginia and Roper v. Simmons have been understandably heralded as important holdings under the Court’s Eighth Amendment jurisprudence that has found the death penalty “disproportional” for certain types of defendants and crimes. This Article argues, however, that the cases have a far more revolutionary reach than their conventional understanding. In both cases the Court went one step beyond its usual two-step analysis of assessing whether imposing the death penalty violated “evolving standards of decency.” This extra step looked at why even though intellectual disability and ...


Does Atkins Make A Difference In Non-Capital Cases? Should It?, Paul Marcus 2014 William & Mary Law School

Does Atkins Make A Difference In Non-Capital Cases? Should It?, Paul Marcus

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


A Tale Of Two (And Possibly Three) Atkins: Intellectual Disability And Capital Punishment Twelve Years After The Supreme Court’S Creation Of A Categorical Bar, John H. Blume, Sheri Lynn Johnson, Paul Marcus, Emily Paavola 2014 William & Mary Law School

A Tale Of Two (And Possibly Three) Atkins: Intellectual Disability And Capital Punishment Twelve Years After The Supreme Court’S Creation Of A Categorical Bar, John H. Blume, Sheri Lynn Johnson, Paul Marcus, Emily Paavola

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 2, Claudia Taranto 2014 Australian Broadcasting Corporation

A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 2, Claudia Taranto

RadioDoc Review

A Different Kind of Justice tells the story of two people who met across a table in a restorative justice (RJ) conference, facilitated by Karl James, an RJ professional. Margaret’s home is robbed; Ian, a burglar and heroin addict, took a few small items, including a laptop with all her family photos. Margaret reveals that her daughter Jessica died in a car accident a few months after the burglary and the missing photos now mean so much more to the family.

The program is essentially interviews with the two characters, intercut, as they each tell their version of their ...


A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 1, Cassandra Sharp Dr 2014 University of Wollongong, Australia

A Different Kind Of Justice: Review 1, Cassandra Sharp Dr

RadioDoc Review

Despite the accepted success of many restorative justice programs with youth and Indigenous offenders, debate still proliferates about the utility of adult restorative justice programs within the criminal justice system. Many important questions are raised about the efficacy and impact of such programs including: ‘What can restorative justice offer adult offenders and victims of crime? What are some of the challenges of using restorative justice in this context? And what can we learn from emerging developments in practice?’ (Bolitho et al, 2012). As will be discussed in this review, Russell Finch’s BBC Radio 4 production of A Different Kind ...


40. Andrews, S. J., Lamb, M. E., & Lyon, T. D. (In Press). Question Types, Responsiveness, And Self-Contradictions When Prosecutors And Defence Attorneys Question Alleged Victims Of Sexual Abuse. Applied Cognitive Psychology., Thomas D. Lyon 2014 University of Southern California

40. Andrews, S. J., Lamb, M. E., & Lyon, T. D. (In Press). Question Types, Responsiveness, And Self-Contradictions When Prosecutors And Defence Attorneys Question Alleged Victims Of Sexual Abuse. Applied Cognitive Psychology., Thomas D. Lyon

Thomas D. Lyon

We examined 120 trial transcripts of 6- to 12-year-old children testifying to sexual abuse. Age and attorney role were analyzed in relation to question types, children’s responsiveness, and self-contradiction frequency. A total of 48,716 question-response pairs were identified. Attorneys used more closed-ended than open-ended prompts. Prosecutors used more invitations (3% vs. 0%), directives and option-posing prompts than defence attorneys, who used more suggestive prompts than prosecutors. Children were more unresponsive to defence attorneys than to prosecutors. Self-contradictions were identified in 95% of the cases. Defence attorneys elicited more self-contradictions than prosecutors, but nearly all prosecutors (86%) elicited at ...


5. American Professional Society On The Abuse Of Children In Support Of Petitioner, Ohio V. Clark (Merits), Thomas D. Lyon 2014 University of Southern California

5. American Professional Society On The Abuse Of Children In Support Of Petitioner, Ohio V. Clark (Merits), Thomas D. Lyon

Thomas D. Lyon

No abstract provided.


Dr John Liebert Presentation, Dr John Liebert 2014 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Dr John Liebert Presentation, Dr John Liebert

National Security and Intelligence Symposium

No abstract provided.


Best Practices In Campus Threat Assessment & Management – An Overview, Sigma Threat Assessment Group 2014 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Best Practices In Campus Threat Assessment & Management – An Overview, Sigma Threat Assessment Group

National Security and Intelligence Symposium

No abstract provided.


Shame, Rage And Freedom Of Speech: Should The United States Adopt European "Mobbing" Laws?, Brady Coleman 2014 South Texas College of Law

Shame, Rage And Freedom Of Speech: Should The United States Adopt European "Mobbing" Laws?, Brady Coleman

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Your Brain And Law School, Marybeth Herald 2014 Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Your Brain And Law School, Marybeth Herald

Marybeth Herald

Building on the latest scientific research, Professor Marybeth Herald's practical yet entertaining book, "Your Brain and Law School" (Carolina Academic Press, 2014), offers law students a formula for success in law school, on the bar exam, and as practicing attorneys. Mastering the law, either as a law student or in practice, becomes much easier if one has a working knowledge of the brain’s basic habits. Before you can learn to think like a lawyer, you have to have some idea about how the brain thinks.

The first part of this book (the Introduction to which is available for ...


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