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Pawlik V. Deng, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 11 (Mar. 1, 2018) (En Banc), Will T. Carter 2018 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Pawlik V. Deng, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 11 (Mar. 1, 2018) (En Banc), Will T. Carter

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court held NRS 271.595 creates two redemption periods; one of two years and one of 60-days. The 60-day notice and redemption period must follow the two-year period and cannot run concurrently.


Don’T Let The Bed Bugs Bill: Landlord Liability For Bed Bug Infestations In Georgia, Megan M. Harrison 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Don’T Let The Bed Bugs Bill: Landlord Liability For Bed Bug Infestations In Georgia, Megan M. Harrison

Georgia State University Law Review

Although the historical relationship between bed bugs and humans dates back to ancient Egypt, the common bed bug, or Cimex lectularius, vanished from the beds of Americans around World War II. In the late 1990s, however, our bloodsucking bedfellows returned. Bed bug infestations are a growing public health issue. Bed bugs are now found in all fifty states, with populations in five states reaching epidemic levels. Both the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) consider bed bugs a “pest of significant public health importance."

Despite their name, bed bugs are not limited to ...


Property As The Right To Be Left Alone, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky 2018 University of San Diego

Property As The Right To Be Left Alone, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky

Faculty Scholarship

Once upon a time, there existed a clear nexus between property and privacy. Protection of property rights was an important safeguard against intrusions of the privacy interests of owners both by the government and by private actors. Gradually, however, the symbiotic relationship between privacy and property has been forgotten by scholars and policymakers and fallen into oblivion.

In this Article, we seek to restore the centrality of privacy in property law by making two novel contributions – one descriptive and one normative. Descriptively, we demonstrate that concerns for privacy inform, at times implicitly, many important property doctrines. Indeed, we show that ...


O'Donovan V. Mcintosh: Changing The Contours Of Maine's Easement Law, Michael J. Polak 2018 University of Maine School of Law

O'Donovan V. Mcintosh: Changing The Contours Of Maine's Easement Law, Michael J. Polak

Maine Law Review

In O'Donovan v. McIntosh, a real estate developer, Timothy O'Donovan, brought an action seeking, in part, a declaratory judgment concerning the transferability of an easement that he purchased from the defendant, John A. McIntosh, Jr. O'Donovan and McIntosh subsequently filed a joint motion for partial summary judgment to obtain a ruling that would affirm the assignability of the easement in question. Susan Huggins, the owner of the servient estate upon which the easement in question imposed, objected to this motion as a third party defendant. She filed a cross-motion for summary judgment maintaining that the easement in ...


The Law Of Taking Elsewhere And, One Suspects, In Maine, Orlando E. Delogu 2018 University of Maine School of Law

The Law Of Taking Elsewhere And, One Suspects, In Maine, Orlando E. Delogu

Maine Law Review

The debate as to the meaning of the Taking Clause in the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution seems unending. This short, almost cryptic constitutional provision, “nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation,” has over the years given rise to both court challenges and philosophic debate aimed at parsing out the meaning and parameters of this language. As the need for regulatory controls (imposed by every level of government) has increased, the number of challenges and the stridency of the debate has also increased. Moreover, these challenges have increasingly found their way to the ...


When Should Rights "Trump"? An Examination Of Speech And Property, Laura S. Underkuffler 2018 University of Maine School of Law

When Should Rights "Trump"? An Examination Of Speech And Property, Laura S. Underkuffler

Maine Law Review

In his well-known article, Property, Speech, and the Politics of Distrust, Professor Richard Epstein—a leading contemporary voice in the fields of property theory and constitutional law—makes a simple but compelling argument. There has been, he argues, a mistake in “the dominant mode of thinking about property rights during the past fifty years [that] has been ... of constitutional dimensions.” This mistake, in Professor Epstein's view, is the refusal of the federal courts to accord to individual property rights the same kind of protection from government regulation that is accorded to other constitutional rights. Using free speech as his ...


Life In No Trump: Property And Speech Under The Constitution, Richard A. Esptein 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Life In No Trump: Property And Speech Under The Constitution, Richard A. Esptein

Maine Law Review

The editors of the Maine Law Review have been kind enough to offer me the opportunity to respond to Laura Underkuffler's criticism of my work in her recent Godfrey Lecture, “When Should Rights ‘Trump’? An Examination of Speech and Property,” which appears in the preceding issue. In my earlier writings on constitutional law, more specifically, in my paper, Property, Speech and the Politics of Distrust, I took the position that modern Supreme Court jurisprudence had taken a turn for the worse insofar as it used different standards of review in passing on the constitutionality of legislation. The current position ...


Tax Increment Financing In Maine, Michael G. Walker 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Tax Increment Financing In Maine, Michael G. Walker

Maine Law Review

Tax Increment Financing ("TIF") is a statutorily authorized mechanism which enables municipalities to earmark the property tax revenue from designated areas to pay for things such as infrastructure improvement. Lately, Maine municipalities have been using TIF to refund tax revenues directly to private developers in an effort to attract new business. This Comment will begin by briefly explaining the development of TIF in the United States and how it has evolved over time. It will then summarize how TIF works in Maine and the criticism and praise it has received throughout its existence. Next, it will look at research examining ...


No Need For Cities To Despair After Bank Of America Corporation V. City Of Miami: How Patent Law Can Assist In Proving Predatory Loans Directly Cause Municipal Blight Under The Fair Housing Act, Jesse D.H. Snyder 2018 University of Maine School of Law

No Need For Cities To Despair After Bank Of America Corporation V. City Of Miami: How Patent Law Can Assist In Proving Predatory Loans Directly Cause Municipal Blight Under The Fair Housing Act, Jesse D.H. Snyder

Maine Law Review

Lack of sanguinity for cities was manifest after the Supreme Court’s May 1, 2017, opinion in Bank of America Corporation v. City of Miami. Although Bank of America recognized that cities have Article III standing to sue for economic injuries suffered from predatory lending, the Supreme Court rejected the Eleventh Circuit’s more lenient causation standard, favoring proof of “some direct relation between the injury asserted and the injurious conduct alleged.” Doubtless the result could have been worse for cities suing on the premise that racially discriminatory lending caused municipal blight. The courthouse doors could have closed if the ...


Building On The Tiny House Movement: A Viable Solution To Meet Affordable Housing Needs, Emily Keable 2018 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Building On The Tiny House Movement: A Viable Solution To Meet Affordable Housing Needs, Emily Keable

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Conditions Of Personhood And Property, Zachary James Acree 2018 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Conditions Of Personhood And Property, Zachary James Acree

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This paper seeks to demonstrate that a more robust understanding of personhood both reveals flaws in the underlying assumptions of modern property law, and orients that law to a more just application. To do this, the law needs not only a better definition of what persons are, but also a better understanding of how persons function in their society. First, in order to provide some context to the issues at stake, there is a brief historical introduction to some of the problems that personhood inquiries have faced. After the introduction, this paper is divided into four sections. Part I summarizes ...


Sfr Inv.'S Pool 1, Llc V. First Horizon Home Loans, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 4 (Feb. 1, 2018), Brendan McLeod 2018 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Sfr Inv.'S Pool 1, Llc V. First Horizon Home Loans, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 4 (Feb. 1, 2018), Brendan Mcleod

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court determined that, under provisions of NRS 116.31162, when an HOA records a notice of a foreclosure sale, any subsequent buyer who purchases the property is subject to that notice that a foreclosure may be imminent.


The Administrative Procedure Act And How The “Final Rule” Designation Allows Agencies To Perpetuate Harm By Failing To Act, Julia Eaton 2018 Boston College Law School

The Administrative Procedure Act And How The “Final Rule” Designation Allows Agencies To Perpetuate Harm By Failing To Act, Julia Eaton

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In order to preserve the historic authenticity of Alexander Hamilton’s only home, concerned citizens, community groups, and the National Park Service (NPS) created a plan to move Hamilton’s Home. The Friends of Hamilton Grange (“Friends”) were created to assist the NPS in that process. The Friends never filed official paperwork to become an official “friends group” of the NPS. After years of planning, the NPS approved plans for Hamilton’s home that conflicted with the interests of the Friends. The Friends claimed that the NPS did not properly consult with them throughout the planning process and the undeveloped ...


Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney 2018 Texas A&M University School of Law

Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney

Boston College Law Review

The non-enforcement of existing property laws is not logically separable from the issue of unfair and unjust state deprivations of property rights at which the Constitution’s Takings Clause takes aim. This Article suggests, therefore, that takings law should police allocations resulting from non-enforcement decisions on the same “fairness and justice” grounds that it polices allocations resulting from decisions to enact and enforce new regulations. Rejecting the extant majority position that state decisions not to enforce existing property laws are categorically immune from takings liability is not to advocate that persons impacted by such decisions should be automatically or even ...


Disseisin, Doubt, And Debate: Adverse Possession Scholarship In The United States (1881-1986), John Lovett 2018 Texas A&M University School of Law

Disseisin, Doubt, And Debate: Adverse Possession Scholarship In The United States (1881-1986), John Lovett

Texas A&M Law Review

Property law scholars in the United States have discussed the doctrine of adverse possession for more than a century. Indeed, ever since American property law scholars began to write property law treatises, formalize property law courses in modern law schools, publish property specific articles in law reviews, and publish property law case books, adverse possession has served as a staple of property law discourse. This Article examines how property law scholars think about and discuss adverse possession. It explores how adverse possession talk has changed—and not changed—over time. In other words, this Article examines both the substance and ...


Hb 434 - Eminent Domain, Ashley M. Bowcott, Derek M. Schwahn 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 434 - Eminent Domain, Ashley M. Bowcott, Derek M. Schwahn

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act amends Georgia’s eminent domain laws by providing an exception to the general rule that condemnations cannot be converted to any use, other than a public use, for twenty years. The Act creates a new procedure which requires the condemnor to petition the jurisdiction’s superior court to determine whether the property is blighted property. Additionally, the condemnor must provide notice to all owners of the alleged blighted property. If the court finds the land is blighted property, the condemnor must file a petition to condemn the property according to the established procedure set forth in Article 3 ...


Hb 1 - Space Flight, Malissa Caroline Barger, Ethan L. Smith 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 1 - Space Flight, Malissa Caroline Barger, Ethan L. Smith

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act limits the civil and criminal liability of a space flight entity for injuries sustained by space flight participants arising from ordinary negligence. The Act defines new terms and provides a statutory waiver form that participants with informed consent must sign. The Act mandates space flight participants sign the waiver before participating in any space flight activity. The Act does not limit the liability of space flight entities for gross negligence or intentional acts, nor does it prevent suits from anyone other than the space flight participant.


When Deciding Whether To Allow A Taking Of Property We Need To Ask What We Want Property Rights To Do, Douglas C. Harris 2018 Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia

When Deciding Whether To Allow A Taking Of Property We Need To Ask What We Want Property Rights To Do, Douglas C. Harris

Faculty Publications

In recognition of the dangers inherent to a regime that enables a majority of owners to terminate the individual property interests of a dissenting minority, the Strata Property Act requires that strata corporations secure court confirmation of dissolution votes. Not surprisingly, the shift to a lower dissolution threshold, the rapidly rising land values in British Columbia’s urban centres, and the increased costs of maintaining aging buildings, have precipitated a growing number of dissolution votes and a steady flow of applications to the British Columbia Supreme Court (BCSC) to confirm the votes.


The "Publicization" Of Private Space, Sarah B. Schindler 2018 University of Maine School of Law

The "Publicization" Of Private Space, Sarah B. Schindler

Faculty Publications

Recently, many urban areas have moved away from the creation of publicly owned open spaces and toward privately owned public open spaces, or POPOS. These POPOS take many forms: concrete plazas that separate a building from the sidewalk; glass-windowed atriums in downtown office buildings; rooftop terraces and gardens; and grass-covered spaces that appear to be traditional parks. This Article considers the nature of POPOS and examines whether they live up to expectations about the role that public space should play and the value it should provide to communities. This is especially important because in embracing POPOS, cities have made a ...


Israel's Absentee Property Law: When Is Democratic Failure Necessary?, Bria Smith 2018 Claremont McKenna College

Israel's Absentee Property Law: When Is Democratic Failure Necessary?, Bria Smith

CMC Senior Theses

This paper defends Israel's expropriation of property under the Absentee Property Law within the state’s pre-1967 borders on constitutional grounds, but holds that the Law’s increased use in the region of East Jerusalem is invalid under Israel's constitutional scheme. This distinction turns upon the state’s application of the Law for necessary purposes. I hold that Israel’s justification for breaching human rights explicitly protected must be based on the state’s need to preserve its foundational ideology and national purpose in times of extra-normal circumstances. Israel may act undemocratically only to the extent imperative to ...


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