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Self Interested: Protecting The Cultural And Religious Privacy Of Native Americans Through The Promotion Of Property Rights In Biological Materials, Kimberly Self 2011 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Self Interested: Protecting The Cultural And Religious Privacy Of Native Americans Through The Promotion Of Property Rights In Biological Materials, Kimberly Self

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


Protecting Information Privacy, Charles D. Raab, Benjamin J. Goold 2011 Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia

Protecting Information Privacy, Charles D. Raab, Benjamin J. Goold

Faculty Publications

This report for the Equality and Human Rights Commission (the Commission) examines the threats to information privacy that have emerged in recent years, focusing on the activities of the state. It argues that current privacy laws and regulation do not adequately uphold human rights, and that fundamental reform is required. It identifies two principal areas of concern: the state’s handling of personal data, and the use of surveillance by public bodies. The central finding of this report is that the existing approach to the protection of information privacy in the UK is fundamentally flawed, and that there is a ...


Biometric Passports And Public Policy Challenges’, j lodge 2010 University of Leeds, UK

Biometric Passports And Public Policy Challenges’, J Lodge

j lodge prof

No abstract provided.


The Pii Problem: Privacy And A New Concept Of Personally Identifiable Information, Paul Schwartz, Daniel Solove 2010 Berkeley Law

The Pii Problem: Privacy And A New Concept Of Personally Identifiable Information, Paul Schwartz, Daniel Solove

Paul M. Schwartz

No abstract provided.


Intrusive Monitoring: Employee Privacy Expectations Are Reasonable In Europe, Destroyed In The United States, Lothar Determann, Robert Sprague 2010 University of Wyoming

Intrusive Monitoring: Employee Privacy Expectations Are Reasonable In Europe, Destroyed In The United States, Lothar Determann, Robert Sprague

Robert Sprague

This Article examines the contrasting policy and legal frameworks relating to data privacy in the United States and the European Union, with a particular focus on workplace privacy and intrusive surveillance technologies and practices. It examines the U.S. perspective on modern work-related employer monitoring practices, the laws giving rise to possible employee privacy rights, and specific types of employer monitoring that may lead to actionable invasions of employee privacy rights. This article then addresses the issue of employee privacy from the EU perspective, beginning with an overview of the formation of authority to protect individual privacy rights, followed by ...


Invasion Of The Social Networks: Blurring The Line Between Personal Life And The Employment Relationship, Robert Sprague 2010 University of Wyoming

Invasion Of The Social Networks: Blurring The Line Between Personal Life And The Employment Relationship, Robert Sprague

Robert Sprague

Over one-half billion people worldwide have registered accounts with Facebook, the most popular online social network. This article addresses some of the more significant employment-related legal issues arising from the growing popularity of online social networks. First, the need for employers to investigate the background of prospective employees is examined from the context of employers using online social networks to conduct those investigations. In particular, this article analyzes the degree to which job applicants have privacy rights in the information they post online. This article then examines the interrelationship between online social networks and employees, focusing on limitations faced by ...


The Timely Demise Of The Fourth Amendment Third Party Doctrine, Stephen E. Henderson 2010 University of Oklahoma College of Law

The Timely Demise Of The Fourth Amendment Third Party Doctrine, Stephen E. Henderson

Stephen E Henderson

In what may be a slightly premature obituary, in this response to a forthcoming paper by Matthew Tokson I argue that the Fourth Amendment third party doctrine "has at least taken ill, and it can be hoped it is an illness from which it will never recover." It is increasingly unpopular as a matter of state constitutional law, has long been assailed in scholarship but now thoughtful alternatives are percolating, and it cannot – or at least should not – withstand the pressures which technology and social norms are placing upon it. Even the Supreme Court seems loath to defend or invoke ...


Privacy Torts: Unreliable Remedies For Lgbt Plaintiffs, Anita L. Allen 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Privacy Torts: Unreliable Remedies For Lgbt Plaintiffs, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship

In the United States, both constitutional law and tort law recognize the right to privacy, understood as legal entitlement to an intimate life of one’s own free from undue interference by others and the state. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (“LGBT”) persons have defended their interests in dignity, equality, autonomy, and intimate relationships in the courts by appealing to that right. In the constitutional arena, LGBT Americans have claimed the protection of state and federal privacy rights with a modicum of well-known success. Holding that homosexuals have the same right to sexual privacy as heterosexuals, Lawrence v. Texas symbolizes ...


Known And Unknown, Property And Contract: Comments On Hoofnagle And Moringiello, James Grimmelmann 2010 Cornell Law School

Known And Unknown, Property And Contract: Comments On Hoofnagle And Moringiello, James Grimmelmann

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In addition to gerund-noun-noun titles and a concern with the misaligned incentives of businesses that handle consumers' financial data, Chris Hoofnagle's Internalizing Identity Theft and Juliet Moringiello's Warranting Data Security share something else: hidden themes. Hoofnagle's paper is officially about an empirical study of identity theft, but behind the scenes it's also an exploration of where we draw the line between public information shared freely and secret information used to authenticate individuals. Moringiello's paper is officially a proposal for a new warranty of secure handling of payment information, but under the surface, it invites us ...


Dying For Privacy: Pitting Public Access Against Familial Interests In The Era Of The Internet, Clay Calvert 2010 Northwestern University School of Law

Dying For Privacy: Pitting Public Access Against Familial Interests In The Era Of The Internet, Clay Calvert

NULR Online

I just killed my two kids. . . . I drowned them. . . . They are 2 and 4. . . . I just shot myself. . . . with a gun. . . . Please hurry.”

That was the dying declaration of 21-year-old Julia Murray on February 16, 2010, preserved for all of posterity on a 911 emergency telephone recording and available to anyone and everyone in Florida—from journalists and police to even voyeurs and perverts—under that state’s open records laws. Murray and one of her three children are gone (the second child survived the drowning attempt), but her words remain. Should the public have a right to hear them ...


From Scanning To Sexting: The Scope Of Protection Of Dignity-Based Privacy In Canadian Child Pornography Law, Andrea Slane 2010 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

From Scanning To Sexting: The Scope Of Protection Of Dignity-Based Privacy In Canadian Child Pornography Law, Andrea Slane

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

The Canadian approach to privacy rights in one's body is embedded in the relationship between interests in privacy, bodily integrity, and human dignity. Clarifying these interests is complicated by Canada's middle-ground stance between the European "dignity-based" approach to privacy and the US "liberty-based" orientation. The Canadian approach is closer to the European model when intrusions upon the body are conceived as wholly or mostly non-consensual (e.g., strip searches, voyeurism, and most child pornography). However, once consent plays a potentially determinative rote, the US liberty-based approach gains ground. This reluctance to fully align dignity with privacy results in ...


Data Protection: The Challenges Facing Social Networking, Daniel B. Garrie, Maureen Duffy-Lewis, Rebecca Wong, Richard L. Gillespie 2010 Brigham Young University Law School

Data Protection: The Challenges Facing Social Networking, Daniel B. Garrie, Maureen Duffy-Lewis, Rebecca Wong, Richard L. Gillespie

Brigham Young University International Law & Management Review

No abstract provided.


Legal And Ethical Implications Of Corporate Social Networks, Gundars Kaupins, Susan Park 2010 Boise State University

Legal And Ethical Implications Of Corporate Social Networks, Gundars Kaupins, Susan Park

Management Faculty Publications and Presentations

Corporate social networking sites provide employees and employers with considerable opportunity to share information and become friends. Unfortunately, American laws do not directly address social networking site usage. The National Labor Relations Act, civil rights laws, and various common law doctrines such as employment at-will and defamation provide the pattern for future social networking laws. Ethical considerations such as productivity, security, goodwill, privacy, accuracy, and discipline fairness also affect future laws. Corporate policies on corporate social networking should balance the employer‘s and employee‘s interests. Existing laws and ethical issues associated with social networking should impact social networking policies ...


How Different Are Young Adults From Older Adults When It Comes To Information Privacy Attitudes & Policies?, Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Jennifer King, Su Li, Joseph Turow 2010 University of Pennsylvania

How Different Are Young Adults From Older Adults When It Comes To Information Privacy Attitudes & Policies?, Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Jennifer King, Su Li, Joseph Turow

Departmental Papers (ASC)

Media reports teem with stories of young people posting salacious photos online, writing about alcohol-fueled misdeeds on social networking sites, and publicizing other ill-considered escapades that may haunt them in the future. These anecdotes are interpreted as representing a generation-wide shift in attitude toward information privacy. Many commentators therefore claim that young people “are less concerned with maintaining privacy than older people are.” Surprisingly, though, few empirical investigations have explored the privacy attitudes of young adults. This report is among the first quantitative studies evaluating young adults’ attitudes. It demonstrates that the picture is more nuanced than portrayed in the ...


Privacy Revisited: Gps Tracking As Search And Seizure, Bennett L. Gershman 2010 Pace University School of Law

Privacy Revisited: Gps Tracking As Search And Seizure, Bennett L. Gershman

Pace Law Review

Part I of this Article discusses the facts in People v. Weaver, the majority and dissenting opinions in the Appellate Division, Third Department decision, and the majority and dissenting opinions in the Court of Appeals decision. Part II addresses the question that has yet to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court—whether GPS tracking of a vehicle by law enforcement constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment. Part III addresses the separate question that the Court of Appeals did not address in Weaver—whether the surreptitious attachment of a GPS device to a vehicle constitutes a seizure under ...


Undermined Norms: The Corrosive Effect Of Information Processing Technology On Informational Privacy, Richard Warner 2010 IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

Undermined Norms: The Corrosive Effect Of Information Processing Technology On Informational Privacy, Richard Warner

All Faculty Scholarship

Informational privacy is a matter of control; it consists in the ability to control when one’s personal information is collected, how it is used, and to whom it is distributed. The degree of control we once enjoyed has vanished. Advances in information processing technology now give others considerable power to determine when personal information is collected, how it is used, and to it is whom distributed. Privacy advocates sound the alarm in regard to both the governmental and private sectors. I focus exclusively on the later. Relying on the extensive privacy advocate literature, I assume we should try to ...


Flexing Judicial Muscles: Did The Ninth Circuit Abandon Judicial Restraint In United States V. Comprehensive Druge Testing, Inc.?, Allen H. Quist 2010 Brigham Young University Law School

Flexing Judicial Muscles: Did The Ninth Circuit Abandon Judicial Restraint In United States V. Comprehensive Druge Testing, Inc.?, Allen H. Quist

Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law

No abstract provided.


The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Bench Memorandum, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 81 (2010), Erin Murphy-Hillstrom, Whitney Hutchinson, Efthymios Katsarelis, Amber Lynn Wagner, Panagiota Kelali 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Bench Memorandum, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 81 (2010), Erin Murphy-Hillstrom, Whitney Hutchinson, Efthymios Katsarelis, Amber Lynn Wagner, Panagiota Kelali

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Petitioner, Aaron Murphy, appeals to the Marshall Supreme Court from a decision affirming the grant of summary judgment in favor of Respondent, MarshCODE, on his claims of defamation, false light invasion of privacy, and breach of contract. Thus, there are now three issues before the Marshall Supreme Court. The first two issues concern whether an individual can maintain an action of defamation and false light invasion of privacy when the false statement arose because of a computer malfunction. The last issue concerns whether the unilateral modification of a privacy agreement constitutes a breach of contract when assent to the modification ...


Cyberwar Policy, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 303 (2010), Matthew Borton, Samuel Liles, Sydney Liles 2010 John Marshall Law School

Cyberwar Policy, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 303 (2010), Matthew Borton, Samuel Liles, Sydney Liles

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Cyberwarfare is a very real threat to the security of the nation. Yet there is confusion and disagreement as to which government body is most appropriate to assume the cyberwar mission. The Strategy to Secure Cyberspace treats the threat primarily as a criminal issue, and assigns responsibility to the Department of Homeland Security. The National Defense Strategy implies that cyberwarfare is a military issue. Both documents may be correct, depending on the case. The cyberspace terrain transcends boundaries, quickly blurring the line between civil or criminal action and an act of war, leaving the government with the issue of assigning ...


Law School & The Web Of Group Affiliation: Socializing, Socialization, And Social Network Site Use Among Law Students, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2010), Eric M. Fink 2010 John Marshall Law School

Law School & The Web Of Group Affiliation: Socializing, Socialization, And Social Network Site Use Among Law Students, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2010), Eric M. Fink

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Online social network sites (“SNS”) have emerged as a significant socio-technical phenomenon in the past several years. Scholars from various disciplines have examined these sites to develop a better understanding of their social significance and implications from a variety of perspectives. Within the burgeoning field of SNS studies, one strand of work focuses on the place of SNSs in students’ educational experiences and the potential pedagogical applications of SNSs. However, the SNS phenomenon generally, and its educational/pedagogical significance in particular, have received scant attention from legal scholars. This article examines the place of SNSs within the contemporary law school ...


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