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The Ftc And Ai Governance: A Regulatory Proposal, Michael Spiro 2020 Seattle University School of Law

The Ftc And Ai Governance: A Regulatory Proposal, Michael Spiro

Seattle Journal of Technology, Environmental & Innovation Law

No abstract provided.


Privacy Protection(Ism): The Latest Wave Of Trade Constraints On Regulatory Autonomy, Svetlana Yakovleva 2020 University of Miami Law School

Privacy Protection(Ism): The Latest Wave Of Trade Constraints On Regulatory Autonomy, Svetlana Yakovleva

University of Miami Law Review

Countries spend billions of dollars each year to strengthen their discursive power to shape international policy debates. They do so because in public policy conversations labels and narratives matter enormously. The “digital protectionism” label has been used in the last decade as a tool to gain the policy upper hand in digital trade policy debates about cross-border flows of personal and other data. Using the Foucauldian framework of discourse analysis, this Article brings a unique perspective on this topic. The Article makes two central arguments. First, the Article argues that the term “protectionism” is not endowed with an inherent meaning ...


A Right To Go Dark (?), David C. Gray 2020 University of Maryland School of Law

A Right To Go Dark (?), David C. Gray

SMU Law Review

In 2013, reports based on documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed committed efforts by federal agencies to develop and deploy data surveillance technologies. These revelations documented the ability of government agencies to monitor internet usage, read the contents of communications, and access data stored in the cloud and on personal devices. These revelations marked a turning point in the public conversation as consumers became aware of the extent to which national security and law enforcement agencies can monitor a wide range of activities in physical and virtual spaces.

The market responded. Technology companies began to ...


Alexa, Give My Personal Information To The Government: The Application Of The Third-Party Doctrine To Smart Devices, Brandon Pieratt 2020 Southern Methodist University, Dedman School of Law

Alexa, Give My Personal Information To The Government: The Application Of The Third-Party Doctrine To Smart Devices, Brandon Pieratt

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


News As Surveillance, Erin C. Carroll 2020 Georgetown University Law Center

News As Surveillance, Erin C. Carroll

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

As inhabitants of the Information Age, we are increasingly aware of the amount and kind of data that technology platforms collect on us. Far less publicized, however, is how much data news organizations collect on us as we read the news online and how they allow third parties to collect that personal data as well. A handful of studies by computer scientists reveal that, as a group, news websites are among the Internet’s worst offenders when it comes to tracking their visitors.

On the one hand, this surveillance is unsurprising. It is capitalism at work. The press’s business ...


Revenge Porn And The Aclu’S Inconsistent Approach, Elena Lentz 2020 Notes Editor, IJLSE Vol.8; J.D. 2020, Ind. Univ. Maurer School of Law

Revenge Porn And The Aclu’S Inconsistent Approach, Elena Lentz

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

No abstract provided.


Reconciling U.S. Banking And Securities Data Preservation Rules With European Mandatory Data Erasure Under Gdpr, Ronald V. Distante 2020 J.D. Candidate, Fordham University School of Law, May 2020

Reconciling U.S. Banking And Securities Data Preservation Rules With European Mandatory Data Erasure Under Gdpr, Ronald V. Distante

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

United States law, which requires financial institutions to retain customer data, conflicts with European Union law, which requires financial institutions to delete customer data on demand. A financial institution operating transnationally cannot comply with both U.S. and EU law. Financial institutions thus face the issue that they cannot possibly delete and retain the same data simultaneously. This Note will clarify the scope and nature of this conflict.

First, it will clarify the conflict by examining (1) the relevant laws, which are Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the U.S. Bank Secrecy Act, and Securities and Exchange Commission ...


Saving America’S Privacy Rights: Why Carpenter V. United States Was Wrongly Decided And Why Courts Should Be Promoting Legislative Reform Rather Than Extending Existing Privacy Jurisprudence, David Stone 2020 St. Mary's University School of Law

Saving America’S Privacy Rights: Why Carpenter V. United States Was Wrongly Decided And Why Courts Should Be Promoting Legislative Reform Rather Than Extending Existing Privacy Jurisprudence, David Stone

St. Mary's Law Journal

Privacy rights are under assault, but the Supreme Court’s judicial intervention into the issue, starting with Katz v. United States and leading to the Carpenter v. United States decision has created an inconsistent, piecemeal common law of privacy that forestalls a systematic public policy resolution by Congress and the states. In order to reach a satisfactory and longlasting resolution of the problem consistent with separation of powers principles, the states should consider a constitutional amendment that reduces the danger of pervasive technologyaided surveillance and monitoring, together with a series of statutes addressing each new issue posed by technological change ...


Privative Copyright, Shyamkrishna Balganesh 2020 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Privative Copyright, Shyamkrishna Balganesh

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

“Privative” copyright claims are infringement actions brought by authors for the unauthorized public dissemination of works that are private, unpublished, and revelatory of the author’s personal identity. Driven by considerations of authorial autonomy, dignity, and personality rather than monetary value, these claims are almost as old as Anglo-American copyright law itself. Yet modern thinking has attempted to undermine their place within copyright law and sought to move them into the domain of privacy law. This Article challenges the dominant view and argues that privative copyright claims form a legitimate part of the copyright landscape. It shows how privative copyright ...


Zoning For Families, Sara C. Bronin 2020 University of Connecticut

Zoning For Families, Sara C. Bronin

Indiana Law Journal

Is a group of eight unrelated adults and three children living together and sharing meals, household expenses, and responsibilities—and holding themselves out to the world to have long-term commitments to each other—a family? Not according to most zoning codes—including that of Hartford, Connecticut, where the preceding scenario presented itself a few years ago. Zoning, which is the local regulation of land use, almost always defines family, limiting those who may live in a dwelling unit to those who satisfy the zoning code’s definition. Often times, this definition is drafted in a way that excludes many modern ...


Cognitive Biases, Dark Patterns, And The ‘Privacy Paradox’, Ari Ezra Waldman 2020 New York Law School

Cognitive Biases, Dark Patterns, And The ‘Privacy Paradox’, Ari Ezra Waldman

Articles & Chapters

Scholars and commentators often argue that individuals do not care about their privacy, and that users routinely trade privacy for convenience. This ignores the cognitive biases and design tactics platforms use to manipulate users into disclosing information. This essay highlights some of those cognitive biases – from hyperbolic discounting to the problem of overchoice – and discusses the ways in which platform design can manipulate disclosure. It then explains how current law allows this manipulative and anti-consumer behavior to continue and proposes a new approach to reign in the phenomenon.


The Ouster Of Parliamentary Sovereignty?, Benjamin Joshua ONG 2020 Singapore Management University

The Ouster Of Parliamentary Sovereignty?, Benjamin Joshua Ong

Research Collection School Of Law

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) establishes the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“IPT”), which hears complaints relating to surveillance activities by public authorities. The Supreme Court case of R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“Privacy International”) concerned the Secretary of State’s power under section 5 of the Intelligence Services Act 1994 to issue a warrant authorising MI5, MI6, or GCHQ to enter or interfere with property “specified” in the warrant. The IPT had to decide whether it was lawful for the Secretary of State to issue a warrant in respect of a class of property (sometimes known ...


The Internet As A Speech Machine And Other Myths Confounding Section 230 Reform, Danielle K. Citron, Mary Anne Franks 2020 Boston University School of Law

The Internet As A Speech Machine And Other Myths Confounding Section 230 Reform, Danielle K. Citron, Mary Anne Franks

Faculty Scholarship

A robust public debate is currently underway about the responsibility of online platforms. We have long called for this discussion, but only recently has it been seriously taken up by legislators and the public. The debate begins with a basic question: should platforms should be responsible for user-generated content? If so, under what circumstances? What exactly would such responsibility look like? Under consideration is Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act—a provision originally designed to encourage tech companies to clean up “offensive” online content. The public discourse around Section 230, however, is riddled with misconceptions. As an initial matter ...


The Clone Wars: The Right To Embryonic Gene Editing Under German Law, Keren Goldberger 2019 Brooklyn Law School

The Clone Wars: The Right To Embryonic Gene Editing Under German Law, Keren Goldberger

Brooklyn Journal of International Law

Germany has the strictest genetic engineering laws in the world and bans virtually all kinds of embryonic gene editing. Since the invention of CRISPR, however, embryonic gene editing is more precise, and the possibilities of curing genetic diseases are more real than ever. This Note will argue for the right to embryonic gene editing through an analysis of German constitutional privacy and right to life jurisprudence. Ultimately, this Note argues for a right to procreate under German law that is backed by the state’s affirmative duty to encourage and protect life. When the technology is available, German Law should ...


“Hey Alexa, Do Consumers Really Want More Data Privacy?”: An Analysis Of The Negative Effects Of The General Data Protection Regulation, Katherine M. Wilcox 2019 Brooklyn Law School

“Hey Alexa, Do Consumers Really Want More Data Privacy?”: An Analysis Of The Negative Effects Of The General Data Protection Regulation, Katherine M. Wilcox

Brooklyn Law Review

Recent news articles discuss the flooding of email inboxes with lengthy terms and condition updates, viral videos of Mark Zuckerberg’s public Cambridge Analytica hearing before Congress, and the phenomenon of internet advertisements appearing for items that consumers merely searched for on Google a day prior. Effective as of May 25, 2018, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) established a framework that sets legal standards targeted at businesses and other data collectors to dramatically increase data privacy protections for citizens of the EU. Consumers, however, do not seem to appreciate these increased protections, as they rarely read ...


Smart Factories, Dumb Policy? Managing Cybersecurity And Data Privacy Risks In The Industrial Internet Of Things, Scott J. Shackelford 2019 University of Minnesota Law School

Smart Factories, Dumb Policy? Managing Cybersecurity And Data Privacy Risks In The Industrial Internet Of Things, Scott J. Shackelford

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


Censorship, Free Speech & Facebook: Applying The First Amendment To Social Media Platforms Via The Public Function Exception, Matthew P. Hooker 2019 University of Washington School of Law

Censorship, Free Speech & Facebook: Applying The First Amendment To Social Media Platforms Via The Public Function Exception, Matthew P. Hooker

Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts

Society has a love-hate relationship with social media. Thanks to social media platforms, the world is more connected than ever before. But with the ever-growing dominance of social media there have come a mass of challenges. What is okay to post? What isn't? And who or what should be regulating those standards? Platforms are now constantly criticized for their content regulation policies, sometimes because they are viewed as too harsh and other times because they are characterized as too lax. And naturally, the First Amendment quickly enters the conversation. Should social media platforms be subject to the First Amendment ...


Going Rogue: Mobile Research Applications And The Right To Privacy, Stacey A. Tovino 2019 William S. Boyd School of Law, University of Nevada

Going Rogue: Mobile Research Applications And The Right To Privacy, Stacey A. Tovino

Notre Dame Law Review

This Article investigates whether nonsectoral state laws may serve as a viable source of privacy and security standards for mobile health research participants and other health data subjects until new federal laws are created or enforced. In particular, this Article (1) catalogues and analyzes the nonsectoral data privacy, security, and breach notification statutes of all fifty states and the District of Columbia; (2) applies these statutes to mobile-app-mediated health research conducted by independent scientists, citizen scientists, and patient researchers; and (3) proposes substantive amendments to state law that could help protect the privacy and security of all health data subjects ...


Between You, Me, And Alexa: On The Legality Of Virtual Assistant Devices In Two-Party Consent States, Ria Kuruvilla 2019 University of Washington School of Law

Between You, Me, And Alexa: On The Legality Of Virtual Assistant Devices In Two-Party Consent States, Ria Kuruvilla

Washington Law Review

When an Amazon Echo is activated, the device is constantly recording and sending those recordings to Amazon’s cloud. For an always recording device such as the Echo, getting consent from every person subject to a recording proves difficult. An Echo-owner consents to the recordings when they purchase and register the device, but when does a guest in an Echo-owner’s home consent to being recorded? This Comment uses Amazon’s Echo and Washington’s privacy statute to illustrate the tension between speech-activated devices and two-party consent laws—which require that all parties subject to a recording consent to being ...


Hb 481 - Heartbeat Bill, Michael G. Foo, Taylor L. Lin 2019 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 481 - Heartbeat Bill, Michael G. Foo, Taylor L. Lin

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act adds an unborn child with a detectable human heartbeat to the definition of a natural person and includes such unborn child in state population counts. The Act defines abortion, prescribes when abortions may be performed, provides exceptions to abortion performance limitations, establishes requirements for performing an abortion, and provides for a right of action, damages, and affirmative defenses. The Act permits alimony and child support payments starting when an unborn child has a detectable human heartbeat. Parents have the right to recover the full value of a child’s life when a detectable human heartbeat exists. The Act ...


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