Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

485,713 Full-Text Articles 186,387 Authors 178,014,929 Downloads 418 Institutions

All Articles in Law

Faceted Search

485,713 full-text articles. Page 5 of 8410.

The Guinea-Bissau Constitutional Reform Debate, Watson Aila Gomes 2020 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

The Guinea-Bissau Constitutional Reform Debate, Watson Aila Gomes

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The enactment of law is not to be confused with the rule of law, and simply having a constitution does not guarantee political order. In Guinea-Bissau there have been calls to write a new constitution, but whether that helps Guinea-Bissau become a more stable country is questionable. Currently, there is a gap in the research of social science, history and political science examining how the processes of instability have unfolded in Guinea-Bissau. Few studies attempt to examine the correlation between a country’s stability and its constitution. A paradoxical situation exists in many countries in Africa where the political system ...


Killing Wotus 2015: Why Three Rulemakings May Not Be Enough, Stephen M. Johnson 2020 Mercer University School of Law

Killing Wotus 2015: Why Three Rulemakings May Not Be Enough, Stephen M. Johnson

Saint Louis University Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Sanctuary Cities And Their Respective Effect On Crime Rates, Adam R. Schutt 2020 Minnesota State University Moorhead

Sanctuary Cities And Their Respective Effect On Crime Rates, Adam R. Schutt

Undergraduate Economic Review

According to the U.S. Center for Immigration Studies (2017), cities or counties in twenty-four states declare themselves as a place of “sanctuary” for illegal immigrants. This study addresses the following question: Do sanctuary cities experience higher crime rates than those cities that are not? Using publicly available data, this regression analysis investigates the relationship between crime rates in selected cities and independent variables which the research literature or the media has linked to criminal activity. Results of this research reveal that sanctuary cities do not experience higher violent or property crime rates than those cities that are not sanctuary ...


Augustine, Lawyers & The Lost Virtue Of Humility, Bruce P. Frohnen 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Augustine, Lawyers & The Lost Virtue Of Humility, Bruce P. Frohnen

Catholic University Law Review

The leading edge of legal scholarship and practice in recent decades has evinced a commitment to progressive politics at the expense of constitutional governance, the rule of law, and justice understood as vindication of the reasonable expectations of both the public and the parties to any given case or controversy. This article argues that renewed understanding of the virtue of humility, rooted in a genuine concern to do good according to one’s abilities, rights, and duties, is essential to the maintenance of decency in the legal profession and society as a whole. Such virtue is allowed, if not required ...


Desert In The Deluge: Using Data To Drive Racial Equity, Elizabeth J. Kennedy 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Desert In The Deluge: Using Data To Drive Racial Equity, Elizabeth J. Kennedy

Catholic University Law Review

Corporations, governments, and research institutions have learned to harness the power of data to make strategic and operational decisions that drive profitability, efficiency, and efficacy. Making meaningful use of an unprecedented and expanding volume of high velocity, complex and variable data sets—so called “big data—has also been heralded to help solve social problems like human trafficking, homelessness and climate change. Despite this data deluge, those engaged in the advancement of racial equity in workforce development operate in a data desert. Structural barriers to workplace opportunity and advancement perpetuate racialized gaps in wages and household wealth and result in ...


Adapting U.S. Electronic Surveillance Laws, Policies, And Practices To Reflect Impending Technological Developments, Eric Manpearl 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Adapting U.S. Electronic Surveillance Laws, Policies, And Practices To Reflect Impending Technological Developments, Eric Manpearl

Catholic University Law Review

Intelligence collection must always evolve to meet technological developments. While the collection programs under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act of 2008 have produced a great deal of valuable intelligence over the last decade, the United States must begin to think about foreseeable technological developments and strategically consider how to conduct signals intelligence (SIGINT) collection in the future.

This Article identifies four technological trends that could significantly impact the way the United States conducts SIGINT. Individuals now have access to sophisticated technologies that formerly only governments seemed capable of creating, and this decentralization of capabilities will likely only increase ...


The Bumpy Road Of Home States’ Regulation Of Globalized Businesses—Legal And Institutional Disruptions To Supply Chain Disclosure Under The Modern Slavery Act, Shuangge Wen, Jingchen Zhao 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Bumpy Road Of Home States’ Regulation Of Globalized Businesses—Legal And Institutional Disruptions To Supply Chain Disclosure Under The Modern Slavery Act, Shuangge Wen, Jingchen Zhao

Catholic University Law Review

In response to the paradigm shift from territorial corporations to global businesses and supply chains, states are increasingly engaging in regulating extraterritorial business activities, supply chain disclosure regulation being a primary example. Much ink has thus far spilled on the intrinsic doctrinal and conceptual aspects of this regulatory approach, with its interactions to the external regulatory and institutional environment far less considered. This article seeks to correct the scholarly imbalance by critically examining how s.54 of the UK Modern Slavery Act (MSA) – a prominent attempt among state-level initiatives designed to promote human rights protection within global supply chains – fits ...


The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same: The United States, Trade Sanctions, And International Blocking Acts, Meaghan Jennison 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same: The United States, Trade Sanctions, And International Blocking Acts, Meaghan Jennison

Catholic University Law Review

When the United States unilaterally withdrew from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (“JCPOA,” colloquially known as the Iran Nuclear Deal) in May of 2018, that withdrawal signaled not only the United States withdrawal from that deal, of which it had been one of the chief negotiators, but also of a new level of trade engagement by the United States and the Trump Administration within the international community. European countries, in an attempt to continue existing business relationships with the Iranians, pulled an old tool from their toolbox – the blocking statute – to attempt to allow European and multinational companies to ...


Zarda And Sexual Orientation Expression: A New High For Title Vii Interpretation, Nico Ramos 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Zarda And Sexual Orientation Expression: A New High For Title Vii Interpretation, Nico Ramos

Catholic University Law Review

Under current federal law, a majority of jurisdictions decline to extend Title VII protections based on sexual orientation; however, a growing number of circuits have reversed precedent and held that Title VII prohibits discrimination sexual orientation discrimination. The Second Circuit’s en banc decision in Zarda v. Altitude Express reached the conclusion that sexual orientation discrimination is as a cognizable claim under Title VII because in order to discriminate against a person sexual orientation, you naturally first have to take their gender into account. The Supreme Court granted certiorari and has now heard oral arguments.

Part I of this note ...


Bringing Rule Of Law And Fairness To The Dysfunctional World Of Sovereign Debt: A Role For Canada?, Maziar Peihani, Mark Jewett 2020 University of British Columbia

Bringing Rule Of Law And Fairness To The Dysfunctional World Of Sovereign Debt: A Role For Canada?, Maziar Peihani, Mark Jewett

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

Restructuring sovereign debt has long proved challenging: There is no formal regime for sovereign insolvencies similar to those that that govern domestic bankruptcy and insolvency and attempts to create one by international treaty have been met with political resistance. Currently, sovereign debt restructuring is governed by the debt contracts themselves along with the background law in the jurisdiction in which the debt is issued. Sovereign immunity also protects most state assets from seizure. These ad hoc restructuring processes are plagued by unpredictability, however, and there are incentives for individual creditors to “hold out,” demanding full repayment of their claims and ...


Re-Charting The Remedial Course For Section 11(B) Violations Post-Jordan, Andrew Pilla, Levi Vandersteen 2020 Scarborough Crown Attorney’s Office, Ministry of Attorney General for Ontario

Re-Charting The Remedial Course For Section 11(B) Violations Post-Jordan, Andrew Pilla, Levi Vandersteen

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

In R v Jordan, the Supreme Court of Canada adopted a new framework for establishing violations of the right to be tried within a reasonable time under section 11(b) of the Charter. It did not, however, adopt a new approach to the remedy applicable thereafter. Since the 1987 decision R v Rahey, the only remedy for unreasonable delay has been a stay of proceedings. This article contends that this “automatic stay rule” must be revisited post-Jordan. It does so by conceptualizing Jordan as a shift from an “interest balancing” framework—where individual and societal interests are weighed against one ...


Search Engines And Global Takedown Orders: Google V Equustek And The Future Of Free Speech Online, Robert Diab 2020 Thomson Rivers University

Search Engines And Global Takedown Orders: Google V Equustek And The Future Of Free Speech Online, Robert Diab

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

The Supreme Court’s decision in Google v Equustek (2017) to uphold a global content takedown order remains controversial and consequential to wider debates about governing the internet. This commentary examines the Court’s underlying assumption – a common view in takedown jurisprudence – that where a portal directs a critical mass of users to a harmful site, it facilitates harm and no longer engages in valuable speech. This ran contrary to the Court’s more considered view of links in Crookes v Newton (2011) as a form of mere reference and valuable per se for enabling the internet as a public ...


Operative Subsidiarity And Municipal Authority: The Case Of Toronto’S Ward Boundary Review, Alexandra Flynn 2020 Peter A Allard School Law, University of British Columbia

Operative Subsidiarity And Municipal Authority: The Case Of Toronto’S Ward Boundary Review, Alexandra Flynn

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

In 2013, under threat of a resident petition and, at worst, an Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) order that would unilaterally impose new electoral districts, the City of Toronto embarked on its first ward boundary review (WBR) since the enactment of the City of Toronto Act, 2006 (COTA). The WBR highlighted the scattered application of subsidiarity within Canada’s federation. Under the notion of federalism enshrined in the Canadian Constitution, municipalities are granted only those powers that derive from provincial legislation. However, the Supreme Court of Canada has invoked the European principle of “subsidiarity” to reframe municipal authority over local issues ...


A Narrowing Field Of View: An Investigation Into The Relationship Between The Principles Of Treaty Interpretation And The Conceptual Framework Of Canadian Federalism, Joshua Ben David Nichols 2020 Faculty of Law, University of Alberta

A Narrowing Field Of View: An Investigation Into The Relationship Between The Principles Of Treaty Interpretation And The Conceptual Framework Of Canadian Federalism, Joshua Ben David Nichols

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

In its recent decisions in Tsilhqot’in Nation and Grassy Narrows, the Supreme Court of Canada has significantly altered the position of Indigenous peoples within the structure of Canadian federalism. This article sets out to investigate the basis for the Court’s jurisdiction to change this structure. Its approach is historical, as it covers judicial treaty interpretation from St Catherine’s Milling to Grassy Narrows. By contextualizing the most recent change in light of the last 250 years of treaty making, we can see how the notion of Crown sovereignty has become entangled with the Westphalian model of the state ...


Pillars Of Justice: Lawyers And The Liberal Tradition, By Owen Fiss, Saba Samanian 2020 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Pillars Of Justice: Lawyers And The Liberal Tradition, By Owen Fiss, Saba Samanian

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

AT TIMES, IT IS POSSIBLE TO UNDERESTIMATE, or perhaps momentarily forget, the individuals who have been instrumental in shaping the evolution of the justice system. Thankfully, Pillars of Justice by Owen Fiss serves as a reminder of the resilience and the triumph of such individuals. Each chapter of the book is dedicated to someone who he considers to have made a significant contribution to justice, and, as such, has become a personal hero.


Holocaust, Genocide, And The Law: A Quest For Justice In A Post-Holocaust World By Michael J. Bazyler, Irina Samborski 2020 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Holocaust, Genocide, And The Law: A Quest For Justice In A Post-Holocaust World By Michael J. Bazyler, Irina Samborski

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

LAW IS COMMONLY THOUGHT OF as an antidote to genocide rather than its facilitator. In Holocaust, Genocide, and the Law, Professor Michael Bazyler of Chapman University’s Fowler School of Law refutes the notion that the Holocaust was an extralegal event—instead, he isolates the law as the preferred instrument of wholesale murder and destruction. The book traces the long shadow that the Holocaust has cast on the contemporary corpus of international law and many legal systems across the world. While it tells the unfolding catastrophe of the Holocaust as a legal history, the book considers the legal triumphs that ...


Antitrust Law In The New Economy By Mark R Patterson, Thomas Dicsi 2020 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Antitrust Law In The New Economy By Mark R Patterson, Thomas Dicsi

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

THE DRAFTERS OF THE SHERMAN ANTITRUST ACT of 1890 would understandably be perplexed by the complexity of modern economic systems. These drafters, including the Act’s namesake, US Senator John Sherman, were operating in a world where protectionist economics dominated. Karl Marx had just recently completed his critique of untethered capitalism, Das Kapital, and international trade was largely confined to the exchange of raw materials. These drafters were responding to an issue very topical to the late-nineteenth century— John D. Rockefeller’s monopoly over American oil. The situation came to a head in 1882 when Samuel Dodd, the attorney to ...


Revisiting The “Private Use Exception” To Canada’S Child Pornography Laws: Teenage Sexting, Sex-Positivity, Pleasure, And Control In The Digital Age, Lara Karaian, Dillon Brady 2020 Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Carleton University

Revisiting The “Private Use Exception” To Canada’S Child Pornography Laws: Teenage Sexting, Sex-Positivity, Pleasure, And Control In The Digital Age, Lara Karaian, Dillon Brady

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

In R v Sharpe, the Supreme Court of Canada read in a “private use exception” to the offence of possessing child pornography. The Court reasoned that youths’ self-created expressive material and private recordings of lawful sexual activity—created by, or depicting the accused and held by the accused exclusively for private use—would pose little or no risk to children and may in fact be of significance to adolescent self-fulfillment, self-actualization, sexual exploration, and identity. Fundamental changes in the technological, social, sexual, and legal landscape since Sharpe have resulted in a lack of clarity regarding the exception’s scope. Federal ...


Human Rights In Global Health: Rights- Based Governance For A Globalizing World Edited By Benjamin M. Meier And Lawrence O. Gostin1, Regiane Garcia, Kristi Heather Kenyon 2020 School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia

Human Rights In Global Health: Rights- Based Governance For A Globalizing World Edited By Benjamin M. Meier And Lawrence O. Gostin1, Regiane Garcia, Kristi Heather Kenyon

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

THIS GROUNDBREAKING COMPILATION, edited by two scholars who helped to establish the “health and human rights” field, systematically explores the structures and processes of human rights implementation in global health institutions while arguing that a rights-based approach to health governance advances global health. The 640-page volume brings together forty-six experienced scholars and practitioners who have contributed to twenty-five chapters organized into six thematic sections. This “unprecedented collection of experts” provides unique, hands-on insights into how the “institutional determinants of the rights-based approach to health” facilitate—or hinder—the “mainstreaming” of human rights into global health interventions. The institutional determinants, which ...


Insights From Snowboard Pedagogy For The Legal Studies Instructor, Jennifer S. Anderson, David W. Read, Konrad S. Lee, John Linford 2020 DePaul University

Insights From Snowboard Pedagogy For The Legal Studies Instructor, Jennifer S. Anderson, David W. Read, Konrad S. Lee, John Linford

DePaul Journal of Sports Law

This paper intends to inform and avail instructors of pedagogical approaches proven effective in winter sports environments, specifically in the sport of snowboarding, that we suggest may be particularly effective in teaching business law to non-law students in undergraduate business programs. We join other scholars in examining the approach to teaching business law to non-law students in an effort to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to manage the “dynamic and untidy” legal issues that business professionals deal with, while mitigating the difficult and confusing subject matter and pedagogy associated with business law courses. Broadly speaking, teaching requires the acquisition ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress