Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

368823 Full-Text Articles 147408 Authors 139003866 Downloads 359 Institutions

All Articles in Law

Faceted Search

368823 full-text articles. Page 5 of 6563.

Contemplating The Use Of Classified Or State Secret Information Obtained Ex Parte On The Merits In Civil Litigation: Bl(A)Ck Tea Society V. City Of Boston, Brian M. Tomney 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Contemplating The Use Of Classified Or State Secret Information Obtained Ex Parte On The Merits In Civil Litigation: Bl(A)Ck Tea Society V. City Of Boston, Brian M. Tomney

Maine Law Review

In Bl(a)ck Tea Society v. City of Boston, the First Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed, without dissent, a district court's ruling denying protesters at the 2004 Democratic National Convention a preliminary injunction designed to force the City of Boston to modify its designated demonstration zone (DZ) and remove some of the draconian security measures surrounding the zone. The injunction was denied by Judge Woodlock after he personally inspected the DZ and determined that, given “constraints of time, geography, and safety,” there were no viable alternatives—to site location or construction of the DZ itself—that could reasonably ...


Smith V. Town Of Pittston: Municipal Home Rule's Narrow Escape From The Morass Of Implicit Preemption, Shane Wright 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Smith V. Town Of Pittston: Municipal Home Rule's Narrow Escape From The Morass Of Implicit Preemption, Shane Wright

Maine Law Review

In Smith v. Town of Pittston, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court, sitting as the Law Court, upheld a municipal ordinance adopted by the town of Pittston that prohibited the spreading of septage within Pittston. The majority held that Pittston's ordinance did not violate the Maine Hazardous Waste, Septage and Solid Waste Management Act (Solid Waste Management Act), which “govern[s] the disposal of garbage, sludge, septage and other waste.” The majority interpreted the “home rule” statute as granting sufficient authority to Pittston, as a municipal corporation, to enact the ordinance at issue. The dissent, on the other hand, would ...


Distinguished Jurist-In-Residence Lecture: Sentencing Reform: When Everyone Behaves Badly, Nancy Gertner 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Distinguished Jurist-In-Residence Lecture: Sentencing Reform: When Everyone Behaves Badly, Nancy Gertner

Maine Law Review

Sentencing is different from almost all functions of the government and surely different from the other functions of the judiciary. It is the moment when state power meets an individual directly. It necessarily involves issues that are distinct from those in other areas of the law. It requires a court to focus on the defendant, to craft a punishment proportionate to the offense and to the offender. It should come as no surprise that in countries across the world, common law and civil code, totalitarian and free, judges have been given great discretion in sentencing. To be sure, that power ...


Frank M. Coffin Lecture On Law And Public Service: The Future Of International Criminal Justice, Richard J. Goldstone 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Frank M. Coffin Lecture On Law And Public Service: The Future Of International Criminal Justice, Richard J. Goldstone

Maine Law Review

The Thirteenth Annual Frank M. Coffin Lecture on Law and Public Service was held in the fall of 2004. Justice Richard J. Goldstone, former Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa and pioneer for international justice and human rights, delivered the lecture. Established in 1992, the lecture honors Judge Frank M. Coffin, Senior Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, an inspiration, mentor, and friend to the University of Maine School of Law.


Reflections On The Challenging Proliferation Of Mental Health Issues In The District Court And The Need For Judicial Education, Jessie B. Gunther 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Reflections On The Challenging Proliferation Of Mental Health Issues In The District Court And The Need For Judicial Education, Jessie B. Gunther

Maine Law Review

Maine's courts constantly deal with litigants with mental health issues. Historically, our decisions have relied on expert testimony addressing specific issues of responsibility, risk, and treatment. In recent years, by my observation, court involvement in the treatment process has increased, but the availability of expert evidence has decreased. Thus, we as judges have become the ultimate decision-makers regarding litigants' mental health treatment in both criminal and civil contexts, without supporting expert testimony. In the face of this development, three interconnected issues arise. The first issue is whether judges should even attempt to fill the void caused by lack of ...


Abuse Of Discretion: Maine's Application Of A Malleable Appellate Standard, Andrew M. Mead 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Abuse Of Discretion: Maine's Application Of A Malleable Appellate Standard, Andrew M. Mead

Maine Law Review

It is not unusual for an appellate court to simply announce: “In the circumstances of this case, the trial justice did not abuse his discretion ....” No further clarification or elaboration is offered by the learned justices of the court. The parties are left with a final judgment, but little understanding of the appellate court's review process. Although the objective of finality is satisfied, the objective of clarity is ignored. When litigants and counsel are faced with similar factual or legal circumstances in the future, they remain without guidance or insight into the factors that the appellate court deemed to ...


Judges, Racism, And The Problem Of Actual Innocence, Stephen J. Fortunato Jr. 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Judges, Racism, And The Problem Of Actual Innocence, Stephen J. Fortunato Jr.

Maine Law Review

The facts and data are in and the conclusion they compel is bleak: the American criminal justice system and its showpiece, the criminal trial, harbor at their core a systemic racism. For decades, criminologists, law professors, sociologists, government statisticians, and others have been collecting and collating data on crime, punishment, and incarceration in the United States. These intrepid scholars have looked at crime, criminals, and the justice system from all angles—the race of defendants and victims; the relationship of poverty to criminality; severity of crime; severity of punishment; incarceration rates for different racial groups; sentencing and sentence disparities; and ...


Witness For The Client: A Judge's Role In Increasing Awareness In The Defendant, Joyce Wheeler 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Witness For The Client: A Judge's Role In Increasing Awareness In The Defendant, Joyce Wheeler

Maine Law Review

My participation in a new drug treatment court over the last few years signifies a transformation of this judge's application of herself in the courtroom. I have moved from the traditional role of judge to a more fluid role in which I begin from the stance as witness for the client and, when necessary, move to the more traditional decision-making responsibility of a judge. Awareness of the change occurred over time, but became most apparent in the context of an adult drug treatment court that integrates drug and alcohol treatment into the criminal justice system. A number of factors ...


When The Court Speaks: Effective Communication As A Part Of Judging, Daniel E. Wathen 2017 University of Maine School of Law

When The Court Speaks: Effective Communication As A Part Of Judging, Daniel E. Wathen

Maine Law Review

One of my early judicial role models, Justice James L. Reid of the Maine Superior Court, was sentencing a defendant for a murder committed within the confines of the Maine State Prison. The defendant was already serving a life sentence for another murder at the time the offense was committed. Because Maine has no parole or capital punishment, the sentencing options were limited and ultimately meaningless. As Jim imposed a life sentence consecutive to the existing life sentence, the defendant rose in his manacles and uttered an early Anglo-Saxon version of “screw you.” Jim, rising from the bench and moving ...


Court-Connected Alternative Dispute Resolution In Maine, Howard H. Dana Jr. 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Court-Connected Alternative Dispute Resolution In Maine, Howard H. Dana Jr.

Maine Law Review

With these words of prophecy the Commission to Study the Future of Maine's Courts launched its discussion of alternative dispute resolution (ADR). Although conceding that “the adversary process ... has served the people of the state well” and acknowledging that “the state must continue to provide a forum for forceful advocacy that produces a definite and binding judicial decision” the Commission asked the Maine judicial and legislative branches to embrace ADR. For the last dozen years, the Author has been the Supreme Judicial Court's (SJC's) liaison to its ADR Planning and Implementation Committee and Chair of the Court ...


Some Reflections On Dissenting, Kermit V. Lipez 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Some Reflections On Dissenting, Kermit V. Lipez

Maine Law Review

In the collegial world of appellate judging, where the dominant impulse is consensus, dissents depart from the norm. If their language is sharp, the dissents may offend colleagues and worry court watchers who expect consensus. These self-assigned opinions also add to the pressures of the work. Given these implications, the choice to dissent should never be a casual one. You must weigh the institutional and personal costs and benefits, understand the purpose of the dissent and the audiences for it, and always be attentive to style and tone. In a haphazard sort of way, I consider these issues when I ...


Dedication To Dean Edward Settle Godfrey, Iii, Christine I. Hepler 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Dedication To Dean Edward Settle Godfrey, Iii, Christine I. Hepler

Maine Law Review

It is impossible to fully describe the impact that Dean Godfrey had (and continues to have) on the legal community in Maine, on the University of Maine School of Law, and on the Maine Law Review. This Article provides a sampling of the lives he touched and the contributions he made to the law through his writings. On February 5, 2005, the Maine legal community celebrated the life and work of the Honorable Edward S. Godfrey, III. In attendance were his family members; past and present faculty, staff, and students of the University of Maine School of Law, the law ...


Editorial Board Vol 57 No. 2 (2005), Katharine McCarthy Editor-in-Chief 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Editorial Board Vol 57 No. 2 (2005), Katharine Mccarthy Editor-In-Chief

Maine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Kingfish’S Mineral Legacy: An Analysis Of The Legality Ofstate Mineral Leases Granted To W.T. Burton And Jamesa. Noe During The Years 1934–1936 And Their Relevanceto Former United States Senator And Louisiana Governorhuey P. Long, Ryan M. Seidemann, Ethel S. Graham, Steven B. "Beaux" Jones, William T. Hawkins, Frederic Augonnet 2017 Louisiana State University Law Center

The Kingfish’S Mineral Legacy: An Analysis Of The Legality Ofstate Mineral Leases Granted To W.T. Burton And Jamesa. Noe During The Years 1934–1936 And Their Relevanceto Former United States Senator And Louisiana Governorhuey P. Long, Ryan M. Seidemann, Ethel S. Graham, Steven B. "Beaux" Jones, William T. Hawkins, Frederic Augonnet

LSU Journal of Energy Law and Resources

No abstract provided.


Vol. 53, No. 13 (November 20, 2017), 2017 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Vol. 53, No. 13 (November 20, 2017)

Indiana Law Annotated

No abstract provided.


A Constitutional Oddity Of Almost Byzantine Complexity: Analyzing The Efficiency Of The Political Function Doctrine, Gregory A. Scopino 2017 Selected Works

A Constitutional Oddity Of Almost Byzantine Complexity: Analyzing The Efficiency Of The Political Function Doctrine, Gregory A. Scopino

Gregory Scopino

No abstract provided.


Collection Of Cryptocurrency Customer-Information: Tax Enforcement Mechanism Or Invasion Of Privacy?, Austin Elliott 2017 Duke Law

Collection Of Cryptocurrency Customer-Information: Tax Enforcement Mechanism Or Invasion Of Privacy?, Austin Elliott

Duke Law & Technology Review

After granting permission to the Internal Revenue Service to serve a digital exchange company a summons for user information, the Federal District Court for the Northern District of California created some uncertainty regarding the privacy of cryptocurrencies. The IRS views this information gathering as necessary for monitoring compliance with Notice 2014-21, which classifies cryptocurrencies as property for tax purposes. Cryptocurrency users, however, view the attempt for information as an infringement on their privacy rights and are seeking legal protection. This Issue Brief investigates the future tax implications of Notice 2014-21 and considers possible routes the cryptocurrency market can take to ...


Coming To Grips With The Ethical Challenges For Capital Post-Conviction Representation Posed By Martinez V. Ryan, John H. Blume, W. Bradley Wendel 2017 Selected Works

Coming To Grips With The Ethical Challenges For Capital Post-Conviction Representation Posed By Martinez V. Ryan, John H. Blume, W. Bradley Wendel

W. Bradley Wendel

In its groundbreaking decision in Martinez v. Ryan, 556 U.S. 1 (2012), the Supreme Court of the United States held that inadequate assistance of post-conviction counsel could be sufficient “cause” to excuse a procedural default thus allowing a federal court in habeas corpus proceedings to reach the merits of an otherwise barred claim that an inmate was deprived of his Sixth Amendment right to the effective assistance of counsel at trial. The upshot of Martinez is that, if state postconviction counsel unreasonably (and prejudicially) fails to raise a viable claim of ineffective assistance of trial counsel, then there is ...


"Never Having Loved At All": An Overlooked Interest That Grounds The Abortion Right, Sherry F. Colb 2017 Cornell Law School

"Never Having Loved At All": An Overlooked Interest That Grounds The Abortion Right, Sherry F. Colb

Sherry Colb

Feminist and some other abortion rights advocates typically ground the right to abortion in bodily integrity, thus conceptualizing abortion as vindicating a right to disassociate oneself from an intruder. Although valid as a matter of logic, the bodily integrity argument is libertarian and seemingly selfish. But a fundamentally associative interest also grounds the abortion right. A woman who cannot raise a child but is legally required to bear one must undergo the psychic pain of forced separation from an infant whom she is biologically programmed to love. Human mothers, like other mammalian mothers, grieve the loss of their young, as ...


The Supreme Court’S Application Of 'Ordinary Contract Principles' To The Issue Of The Duration Of Retiree Healthcare Benefits: Perpetuating The Interpretation/Gap-Filling Quagmire, Robert A. Hillman 2017 Cornell Law School

The Supreme Court’S Application Of 'Ordinary Contract Principles' To The Issue Of The Duration Of Retiree Healthcare Benefits: Perpetuating The Interpretation/Gap-Filling Quagmire, Robert A. Hillman

Robert Hillman

The United States Supreme Court purported to apply "ordinary contract principles" in its decision reversing the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in M&G Polymers USA v. Tackett . The Sixth Circuit had held that plaintiffs, retired employees of M&G, were entitled to lifetime healthcare benefits under their union's agreement with M&G. According to the Supreme Court, the Sixth Circuit wrongly relied on a false set of "inferences" established in International Union v. Yard-Man, Inc. to find that "in the absence of extrinsic evidence to the contrary, the provisions of [the collective bargaining agreement] indicated an intent to ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress