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Reforming The Law On Police Use Of Deadly Force: De-Escalation, Pre-Seizure Conduct, And Imperfect Self-Defense, Cynthia Lee 2018 George Washington University Law School

Reforming The Law On Police Use Of Deadly Force: De-Escalation, Pre-Seizure Conduct, And Imperfect Self-Defense, Cynthia Lee

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

No abstract provided.


The "Publicization" Of Private Space, Sarah B. Schindler 2018 University of Maine School of Law

The "Publicization" Of Private Space, Sarah B. Schindler

Faculty Publications

Recently, many urban areas have moved away from the creation of publicly owned open spaces and toward privately owned public open spaces, or POPOS. These POPOS take many forms: concrete plazas that separate a building from the sidewalk; glass-windowed atriums in downtown office buildings; rooftop terraces and gardens; and grass-covered spaces that appear to be traditional parks. This Article considers the nature of POPOS and examines whether they live up to expectations about the role that public space should play and the value it should provide to communities. This is especially important because in embracing POPOS, cities have made a ...


The Universality Of The Human Condition: Theorizing Transportation Inequality Claims By Persons With Disabilities In Canada, 1976-2016, Laverne A. Jacobs 2018 University of Windsor, Faculty of Law

The Universality Of The Human Condition: Theorizing Transportation Inequality Claims By Persons With Disabilities In Canada, 1976-2016, Laverne A. Jacobs

Law Publications

Transportation is the lifeline that connects persons with disabilities with the community, facilitating greater opportunities for work, social inclusion and overall independence. Adequate accessible transportation has long been a concern of persons with disabilities. Yet, there is a dearth of sustained research on the law and society implications of transportation inequality for persons with disabilities. This paper contributes to the research on both transportation inequality and equality theory by providing an empirical and theoretical analysis of all the human rights tribunal decisions on disability discrimination and transportation in Canada. The article studies all the statutory human rights decisions on disability ...


Human Rights Extraterritoriality: The Right To Privacy And National Security Surveillance, Francesca Bignami, Giorgio Resta 2018 George Washington University Law School

Human Rights Extraterritoriality: The Right To Privacy And National Security Surveillance, Francesca Bignami, Giorgio Resta

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

This chapter focuses on the international right to privacy and national security surveillance by spy agencies. It assesses the extent to which the law of the United States and Europe (EU and ECtHR) afford extraterritorial protection for the right to privacy, in furtherance of the international human right to privacy. The chapter concludes that U.S. law draws a stark line between insiders (U.S. citizens and permanent residents) and outsiders, and affords significantly more protection for insiders. On the European side, even though the EU does not have jurisdiction internally over spy agencies, it does have the power to ...


Puerto Rico And The Right Of Accession, Joseph Blocher, Mitu Gulati 2018 Duke Law School

Puerto Rico And The Right Of Accession, Joseph Blocher, Mitu Gulati

Faculty Scholarship

On June 11, 2017, Puerto Rico held a referendum on its legal status. Although turnout was low, 97% of ballots favored statehood, rather than independence or the status quo. The federal government, however, has financial and political reasons to resist this preference: Puerto Rico would bring with it a massive, unpayable debt, and the potential to swing the current balance of power in Congress. That then raises the two questions of whether Congress could decide expel Puerto Rico (give it “independence”) or is legally required to give it statehood (“accession”).

The answers are not obvious. International law, we argue, suggests ...


U.S. War Powers And The Potential Benefits Of Comparativism, Curtis A. Bradley 2018 Duke Law School

U.S. War Powers And The Potential Benefits Of Comparativism, Curtis A. Bradley

Faculty Scholarship

There is no issue of foreign relations law more important than the allocation of authority over the use of military force. This issue is especially important for the United States given the frequency with which it is involved in military activities abroad. Yet there is significant uncertainty and debate in the United States over this issue — in particular, over whether and to what extent military actions must be authorized by Congress. Because U.S. courts in the modern era have generally declined to review the legality of military actions, disputes over this issue have had to be resolved, as a ...


Picketing In The New Economy, Hiba Hafiz 2018 University of Chicago Law School

Picketing In The New Economy, Hiba Hafiz

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The States' Interest In Federal Procedure, Diego Zambrano 2018 University of Chicago Law School

The States' Interest In Federal Procedure, Diego Zambrano

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Step Therapy: Legal And Ethical Implications Of A Cost-Cutting Measure, Sharona Hoffman 2018 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Step Therapy: Legal And Ethical Implications Of A Cost-Cutting Measure, Sharona Hoffman

Faculty Publications

The very high and ever-increasing costs of medical care in the United States are well-recognized and much discussed. Health insurers have employed a variety of strategies in an effort to control their expenditures, including one that is common but has received relatively little attention: step therapy. Step therapy programs require patients to try less expensive treatments and find them to be ineffective or otherwise problematic before the insurer will approve a more high-priced option. This Article is the first law journal piece dedicated to analyzing this important cost control measure.

The Article explores the strengths and weaknesses of step therapy ...


Auer Evasions, Jonathan Adler 2018 Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Auer Evasions, Jonathan Adler

Faculty Publications

Auer v. Robbins requires federal courts to defer to federal agency interpretations of ambiguous regulations. Auer built upon, and arguably expanded, the Court’s long-standing practice of deferring to agency interpretations of their own regulations born in Bowles v. Seminole Rock. Although initially uncontroversial, the doctrine has come under fire from legal commentators and prominent jurists, including Auer’s author, the late Justice Antonin Scalia. As Justice Scalia came to recognize, Auer deference enables agencies to evade a wide range of legal constraints that are otherwise imposed upon agency behavior, the ability of agencies to take action with the force ...


Breathing Air With Heft: An Experiential Report On Environmental Regulation And Public Health In Urban China, Erin Ryan 2017 Florida State University College of Law

Breathing Air With Heft: An Experiential Report On Environmental Regulation And Public Health In Urban China, Erin Ryan

Erin Ryan

This article explores the gritty intersections of daily life and environmental law in modern China, an industrial powerhouse still struggling to reconcile economic opportunity with breathable air, clean water, healthy food, and safe products.  With comparative perspective on analogous challenges in the United States, the article reports on these critical domestic challenges for China at a pivotal moment in its reemergence as a dominant world power.  China’s continued geopolitical rise may well hinge on its ability to respond successfully to the environmental causes of growing social unrest.
 
In 2011, in the midst of this maelstrom, I brought my husband ...


Should The Rules Committees Have An Amicus Role?, Scott Dodson 2017 University of California Hastings College of Law

Should The Rules Committees Have An Amicus Role?, Scott Dodson

Scott Dodson

Despite its formal status as promulgator of federal-court rules of practice and procedure, the Supreme Court is a suboptimal rule interpreter, as recent groundbreaking but flawed rules decisions illustrate. Scholars have proposed abstention mechanisms to constrain the Court in certain rule-interpretation contexts, but these mechanisms disable the Court from performing its core adjudicatory functions of dispute resolution and law interpretation. This article urges a different solution: bring the rulemakers to the Court. It argues that the Rules Committees—those bodies primarily responsible for studying the rules and drafting rule amendments—should take up a modest amicus practice in rules cases ...


Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World’S Polar Regions, Mark P. Nevitt, Robert V. Percival 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World’S Polar Regions, Mark P. Nevitt, Robert V. Percival

Mark P Nevitt

Climate change is fundamentally transforming both the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions.  Yet they differ dramatically in their governing legal regimes.  For the past sixty years the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS), a traditional “hard law” international law treaty system, effectively de-militarized the Antarctic region and halted competing sovereignty claims. In contrast, the Arctic region lacks a unifying Arctic treaty and is governed by the newer “soft law” global environmental law model embodied in the Arctic Council’s collaborative work.  Now climate change is challenging this model.  It is transforming the geography of both polar regions, breaking away massive ice sheets ...


Active Judging And Access To Justice.Pdf, Anna E. Carpenter 2017 University of Tulsa College of Law

Active Judging And Access To Justice.Pdf, Anna E. Carpenter

Anna E. Carpenter

Active judging, where judges step away from the traditional, passive role to assist those without counsel, is a central feature of recent proposals aimed at solving the pro se crisis in America’s state civil courts.  Despite growing support for active judging as an access to justice intervention, we know little, empirically, about how judges interact with pro se parties as a general matter, and even less about active judging.  In response, this Article contributes new data and a new theoretical framework: the three dimensions of active judging.  These dimensions capture a judge’s role in adjusting procedures, explaining law ...


What Conflict Minerals Rules Tell Us About The Legal Transplantation Of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards Without The State: From The United Nations To The United States To Taiwan, Chang-hsien (Robert) TSAI, Yen-nung WU 2017 National Tsinghua University

What Conflict Minerals Rules Tell Us About The Legal Transplantation Of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards Without The State: From The United Nations To The United States To Taiwan, Chang-Hsien (Robert) Tsai, Yen-Nung Wu

Chang-hsien (Robert) TSAI


To resolve global political and scholarly concerns over conflict minerals (“CM”) produced in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and neighboring regions, two kinds of CM-related disclosure rules (or “CM rules”) come into play in regulating their use: government-mandated laws such as Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act in the United States (hereinafter “Sec. 1502”) and transnational voluntary codes such as the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition (“EICC”) Code of Conduct. The creation of both of these CM rules could be attributed to the promotion of such concerns by the United Nations. This article is the first attempt to unpack and ...


Constitutions And Bills Of Rights: Invigorating Or Placating Democracy?, Brian Christopher Jones 2017 University of Dundee

Constitutions And Bills Of Rights: Invigorating Or Placating Democracy?, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

Champions of constitutions and bills of rights regularly portray them as possessing significant, sometimes mysterious, powers. One characterisation is that newly implemented constitutions may invigorate a democracy, particularly at the ballot box. This article challenges that notion. In particular, it examines a number of jurisdictions that have recently implemented constitutions and bill of rights, finding that in many of them, voter turnout decreased after passage, sometimes significantly. As the argument for a codified British constitution endures, the findings of this paper provide provisional evidence that those advocating for such a device should be wary of touting its potentially invigorating democratic ...


Private Law Exceptionalism? Part Ii: A Basic Difficulty With The Argument From Formal Equality, Avihay Dorfman 2017 Tel Aviv University Faculty of Law

Private Law Exceptionalism? Part Ii: A Basic Difficulty With The Argument From Formal Equality, Avihay Dorfman

Avihay Dorfman

Contemporary discussions of private law theory often assume that parties in a private law interaction can relate as equals if, and only if, equality is cast in terms of formal equality (sometimes called transactional equality).  I devote these pages to refute this conceptual view, showing that it does not draw correctly the map of the logical space in which conceptions of private law equality are located.  Negatively, I argue that the formal conception of equality, most comprehensively defended by certain influential corrective justice theories, does not exhaust this space.  Affirmatively, I argue that this space provides room for at least ...


Security In A Liberal Union: Eu Asylum And Migration Control Policies, Gregor Noll 2017 Selected Works

Security In A Liberal Union: Eu Asylum And Migration Control Policies, Gregor Noll

Gregor Noll


In this contribution I argue that the asylum and migration control policies of the EU are usefully analysed as an expression of liberal thought. I will show how the roots of these policies go all the way back to the creation of the Union in the 50s and illustrate how this heritage affects the prevailing rules in the areas of migration and asylum. I shall also highlight how this order was paradoxically strengthened during the crisis of 2015 and 2016. I will explain why the concept of solidarity in EU law is poorly constructed and map possible solutions. If the ...


Evaluating Corporate Speech About Science, Shannon Roesler 2017 Oklahoma City University School of Law

Evaluating Corporate Speech About Science, Shannon Roesler

Shannon Roesler

How should courts evaluate the truth or falsity of corporate speech about science? This question is critical to antifraud actions like the ongoing state investigations into whether ExxonMobil misrepresented scientific knowledge regarding global climate change. ExxonMobil claims that these investigations chill scientific inquiry and burden speech on a matter of public concern in violation of the First Amendment. Of course, the notion that scientific progress depends on the free exchange of ideas is uncontroversial. But although the free-market approach to scientific discourse has firm foundations, this Article suggests that it is a misguided approach to the question of when corporate ...


Contingent Judicial Deference: Theory And Application To Usury Laws, Bernardo Guimarães, Bruno Meyerhof Salama 2017 FGV Law School in Sao Paulo

Contingent Judicial Deference: Theory And Application To Usury Laws, Bernardo Guimarães, Bruno Meyerhof Salama

Bruno Meyerhof Salama

Legislation is less likely to be enforced when courts disagree with it. Building on this premise, we propose a model of Bayesian adjudicators that use their own prior knowledge to evaluate the appropriateness of legislation. The model yields a non-monotonic relation between written rules and effectively enforced rules. Hence the enactment of legislation prohibiting something raises the probability that courts will allow related things not expressly forbidden. Moreover, legal uncertainty is greater with legislation that commands little deference from courts than with legislation that commands none. We discuss examples of e§ects of legislated prohibitions (and, in particular, usury laws ...


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