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Florida Adoption Intervention Statute: Balancing The Constitutional Rights Of The Parents With The Best Interest Of The Dependent Child, Taylor Smith 2017 Barry University - Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law

Florida Adoption Intervention Statute: Balancing The Constitutional Rights Of The Parents With The Best Interest Of The Dependent Child, Taylor Smith

Child and Family Law Journal

No abstract provided.


How Social Media Is Affecting The Lives Of Minors Including Current Legal Safeguards And Their Weaknesses, Erin Carpenter 2017 Barry University - Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law

How Social Media Is Affecting The Lives Of Minors Including Current Legal Safeguards And Their Weaknesses, Erin Carpenter

Child and Family Law Journal

No abstract provided.


"Jury Of My Peers": The Significance Of A Racially Representative Jury For Juveniles In Adult Court, Clyde Lemon 2017 Barry University - Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law

"Jury Of My Peers": The Significance Of A Racially Representative Jury For Juveniles In Adult Court, Clyde Lemon

Child and Family Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Samuel Alito: Populist, William Araiza 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Samuel Alito: Populist, William Araiza

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Recasting Vagueness: The Case Of Teen Sex Statutes, Cynthia Godsoe 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Recasting Vagueness: The Case Of Teen Sex Statutes, Cynthia Godsoe

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Financing The Benefit Corporation, Steven A. Dean, Dana Brakman Reiser 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Financing The Benefit Corporation, Steven A. Dean, Dana Brakman Reiser

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Indigenous Legal Orders In Canada - A Literature Review, Michael Coyle 2017 UWO Law

Indigenous Legal Orders In Canada - A Literature Review, Michael Coyle

Law Publications

This is a literature review of publications concerning Indigenous legal orders in Canada. Funded by a SSHRC knowledge synthesis grant (2016), it follows the required format for Knowledge Synthesis Reports.

The suppression of Indigenous legal orders was an integral part of the colonial project to assimilate Indigenous peoples, a project exemplified by Canada’s now notorious experiment with Indian Residential Schools. Long marginalized by the Canadian state, the importance of Aboriginal peoples’ own legal systems has recently been recognized by the Supreme Court of Canada, by academics (including prominent Indigenous scholars) and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, who all have ...


Table Of Contents, 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Table Of Contents

FIU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Editorial Board, 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Editorial Board

FIU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Publisher, 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Publisher

FIU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Florida Joins The Fight Against Revenge Porn: Analysis Of Florida’S New Anti-Revenge Porn Law, Diane Bustamante 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Florida Joins The Fight Against Revenge Porn: Analysis Of Florida’S New Anti-Revenge Porn Law, Diane Bustamante

FIU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Contemporary Soviet Criminal Law: An Analysis Of The General Principles And Major Institutions Of Post-1958 Soviet Criminal Law, Chris Osakwe 2016 Tulane University School of Law

Contemporary Soviet Criminal Law: An Analysis Of The General Principles And Major Institutions Of Post-1958 Soviet Criminal Law, Chris Osakwe

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, 2016 Golden Gate University School of Law

Table Of Contents

Golden Gate University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Preface, Courtney Brown, Rosalyn Jamili 2016 Golden Gate University School of Law

Preface, Courtney Brown, Rosalyn Jamili

Golden Gate University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Masthead, 2016 Golden Gate University School of Law

Masthead

Golden Gate University Law Review

Masthead and front matter.


Boyd Briefs - Dec. 9, 2016, University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law 2016 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Boyd Briefs - Dec. 9, 2016, University Of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School Of Law

Boyd Briefs / Road Scholars

Boyd Briefs provides weekly information regarding the activities and accomplishments of the faculty, students, and alumni of the William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.


No Drop Prosecution & Domestic Violence: Screening For Cooperation In The City That Never Speaks, Allessandra DeCarlo 2016 Brooklyn Law School

No Drop Prosecution & Domestic Violence: Screening For Cooperation In The City That Never Speaks, Allessandra Decarlo

Journal of Law and Policy

Throughout history, domestic violence has been infamously kept behind closed doors and outside of our legislature. It was not until the 1960s, due to the efforts of the battered women’s movement, that the U.S. government began to address domestic violence as a social ill and offered protection to victims through statutes and policies in both State and Federal capacities. This note elaborates on one such policy, known as a “No-Drop” policy, which has been implemented by prosecutor’s offices throughout New York City’s five boroughs, as a mechanism to aggressively combat domestic violence. “No- Drop” policies allow ...


Protecting Hatred Preserves Freedom: Why Offensive Expressions Command Constitutional Protection, Andrew P. Napolitano 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Protecting Hatred Preserves Freedom: Why Offensive Expressions Command Constitutional Protection, Andrew P. Napolitano

Journal of Law and Policy

The First Amendment is not the guardian of taste. Instead, the U.S. Constitution wholeheartedly protects freedom of thought and expression, even if generated and defined by hatred, as long as that expression does not produce immediate lawless violence. Although free speech may lead to tenuous relationships or uncomfortable debates, it must be defended unconditionally. Too many politicians and lawmakers believe that the freedom of speech protected by the First Amendment attaches only to those ideas and expressions that they approve of; this is not so. This article argues that the Founders intended the First Amendment's free speech principle ...


Where's The Fire?, Burt Neuborne 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Where's The Fire?, Burt Neuborne

Journal of Law and Policy

Freedom of speech is priceless, but distressingly fragile. Life, and law, would be much simpler if we could react to free speech's importance and fragility by granting it absolute legal protection. Since, however, absolute protection of speech is not—and should not be—a serious option, we face the legal realist challenge of erecting a First Amendment legal structure capable of providing real-world protection to highly controversial speech, often by weak speakers, without closing the door to government regulation. Given the uncertainty inherent in applying fact-dependent complex rules in protean factual settings, many potential speakers would avoid being drawn ...


Freedom Of Speech And Equality: Do We Have To Choose?, Nadine Strossen 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Freedom Of Speech And Equality: Do We Have To Choose?, Nadine Strossen

Journal of Law and Policy

As a lifelong activist on behalf of both equality and free speech, I am convinced, based on actual experience, that these core values are mutually reinforcing, and not, as some have argued, in tension with each other. Moreover, I am convinced that this is true even for offensive or hateful speech that affronts our most cherished beliefs. However, defining hateful or offensive speech is inherently arbitrary and subjective, which raises concerns about what speech should be restricted, and how. Empowering government to punish hateful or offensive expresson necessarily vests officials with enormous discretionary power, which will inevitably lead to arbitrary ...


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